proper use for inverter?

kenny chaos Posted By kenny chaos, Oct 26, 2008 at 11:22 AM

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  1. kenny chaos

    kenny chaos
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    I'm adding a conveyor to my processor and have the option of using existing hydraulics which could only be used intermittently, mounting a seperate small gas engine on it, or maybe a 1hp electric motor run off an inverter which is hooked to the processor. Would an inverter work well for this application?
    Thanks in advance-
     
  2. Redox

    Redox
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    You are going to need a REALLY big inverter. Where would you get the power from, anyway?

    I think you are probably going to be better off tapping into the splitter hydraulics. You probably aren't going to be conveying and splitting at the same time anyway. Don't those processors have enormous pumps on them anyway??

    Chris
     
  3. kenny chaos

    kenny chaos
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    The processor is a homebuilt model without a really big pump. I use a small car battery to start the 16hp motor and thought maybe I could run an inverter off of that but I really don't have a clue if it's feasible. If it's possible, then I wouldn't have to stop the process of processing in order to convey.
    Thanks-
     
  4. JustWood

    JustWood
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    I agree. Too much draw for an inverter.
     
  5. kenny chaos

    kenny chaos
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    Good enough.
    Thanks guys-
     
  6. SigElec

    SigElec
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    How about adding a second hydraulic pump for the conveyor. Then it could operate independently of the processor.
     
  7. Redox

    Redox
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    Homemade processor; now you got me interested. Care to lay any pics on us?

    In purely electromechanical terms, the charging circuit on a small engine is only capable of about 200 watts. A 1 HP motor would need about 1200 watts to run and maybe 3600 watts to start. If your machine had a 100 amp alternator, it might be possible...

    Sig has the right idea though. A small hydraulic motor instead of the electric motor would be simpler and more efficient. They aren't that expensive and are very flexible. I'll bet it could work!

    Chris
     
  8. jdemaris

    jdemaris
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    A one horse electric motor can draw 2500-3000 watts when starting. You'd need a 4000 watt inverter at the least. And the DC cables would be carrying 200 amps of current.

    I've got several 3000 watt inverters rated at 4000 surge, and none will run an 18 amp hand-held circular saw consistently. I've been build a cabin in the Adirondacks and use all battery and inverter power to run my tools, so I've had some experience with heavy loads on cheap inverters.

    If you already have hydraulics, why not use a hydraulic motor? That's what the Amish around here do with just about everything that was once electric. They don't allow electricity, but DO allow gas/diesel motors hooked to hydraulic pumps to run hydraulic motors.
     
  9. Gooserider

    Gooserider
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    I would agree... My friend has a conveyor, I'd guess about 30' long, runs off a 5hp Honda engine, that typically does about half throttle. (the faster the engine, the faster the belt moves, which doesn't matter all that much but less than about 1/2 throttle the belt tends to bog and not carry the load if we have two people splitting and tossing onto it...) The engine drives a hydraulic pump which normally drives the hydraulic motor (which I'm guessing has seen better days - the rig is probably 40-50 years old, hangs off the side of an old truck which is used for mobility) It also feeds a second circuit that operates a couple of cylinders that raise and lower the output end.

    The hydraulic setup seems to work well, and doesn't mind living outdoors. I wouldn't want to mess with electrics for that application

    Gooserider
     
  10. kenny chaos

    kenny chaos
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    Yes, I'd care to lay some pics on you. I gotta figure that out also.

    Thanks for all the replys.
     
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