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PSG Caddy vs Super Jack

Post in 'The Boiler Room - Wood Boilers and Furnaces' started by biggenius29, Oct 6, 2009.

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  1. biggenius29

    biggenius29 New Member

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    I have narrowed down my choice for a add on furnace between the PSG Caddy or the Yukon Super Jack.

    What is the better of the two furnaces? I found a deal on a Caddy with a blower for $2500. I found two of them for that price. One is brand new from a dealer, but is last years model, but the unit is about a hour away . The second one was used for two days and I guess it was to big for the house it was installed in and they took it out and put in a Mini Caddy, but this dealer is about 5 minuits from me.

    The Super Jack is $2449, but also $321 for a blower, and I still have to pay shipping.

    What is the better way to go, and what furnace is better? I hear good things of the PSG and the Yukon.

    Also, what size chimney does the Caddy need? One dealer says a 6", the other says a 7".

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  2. laynes69

    laynes69 Minister of Fire

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    I can't tell you much about the Yukon. But the Caddy I can. Its got a 7 gauge firebox which is the same as the Yukon, and the Caddy is EPA Certified. I posted a couple of days ago of a Caddy in action. Built well, with a large secondary heat exchanger, and preheated secondary air for a clean burn. Personally I would choose the Caddy if you want a clean burning unit. They take a 6" flue, and a 7 if you add an oil burner. Also you can add an electric heater to the unit. Your Caddy is less, no shipping and get a reciept it qualifies for the tax credit. Here is a link to the video.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3ND5ia8qA50
  3. biggenius29

    biggenius29 New Member

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    If the power goes out, can a fire still stay going? Or does the Caddy need power to get air to it?
  4. biggenius29

    biggenius29 New Member

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  5. freeburn

    freeburn Feeling the Heat

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    That one on dynamite buys does not include the blower.
  6. CrappieKeith

    CrappieKeith New Member

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    I will point out that the Caddy only has a 5 year warranty whereas the Yukon has 30 years.
    The Caddy is built in Canada the Yukon in the U.S.

    Go to the owners manuals. Look at the draft speed.The Caddy .04-.06 the SJ .03 which means you'll be running less heat up the flue giving you longer burn times and going through less wood with the Super Jack.
    The SJ125 also has a round top to prevent wargage unlike the Caddy.

    buying from Canada says that was a broker fee involved to get it to the US plus there is the dealer markup and potential state sales tax.
    So what are you really getting for your money?
    In this case you do not get what you pay for unlike buying directly from the factory with the Super Jack.

    The SJ125 has more heat exchange surface area too which aides in exchanging heats faster.

    I'm sure I could pick out more differences if I went to their manual.
    I should also mention Yukon gives out free technical service over the phone.
    So there you have it. The Yukons are made to last with over 35 years of furnaces on the market. We are proud of what we build and that we are very competitvely priced.
    They also fall into the biomass credit which allows you to take 30% on your taxes.
  7. lexybird

    lexybird Minister of Fire

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    i would think being that the caddy is made in canada would actually be a strong selling point given their climate is generally much more frigid than ours gets and they would surely know how to build a good heating appliance by this stage of the game . as far as sales tax im pretty sure thats going to come into play in any state you purchase a product like this directly in.for me when i purchase an expensive product i dont usually consider what the companies export tariffs are their broker fees administrative costs etc.. i care about the bottom line final price for me to have this setup and running in my house.id think any unregulated woodstove can possibly run away regardless of the firebox design and having a huge footprint or large overall weight may not transcend into a gain over a smaller more advanced unit ,seems there is a limitation to everything .
  8. laynes69

    laynes69 Minister of Fire

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    The EPA Certification means it went through strict guidlines with emissions to qualify. The Yukon is a EPA Exempt furnace. Meaning pollution is higher. If the Yukon was what they say it is, they would have got the certification a long time ago. I'm not a salesman, but a happy owner. Also read the print on the furnaces. The Yukon has a prorated warranty. The Caddy is a step into the future with its clean burning technologies. Thats why I choose the furnace I did. As far as fees go you get them everywhere you go.
  9. biggenius29

    biggenius29 New Member

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    Is that a PSG? The only one I find from them is the Caddy and Mini Caddy.
  10. mike1234

    mike1234 New Member

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    Just one thing you might look at, what are you going to do with the caddy if it is running hot (normal) and the electricity goes out? Where does all that heat go? Does it warp / ruin the furnace, or just pump all that heat into your ducting, and you do not want that kind of heat into your ducting. The superjack has a heat dump you can buy for dealing with that issue if you are not home. Maybe it can be used with the caddy too, not sure. When you get home after the power outage you can remove the sides and still burn the superjack to provide heat, I don't think the caddy is set up for that either.

    Just a little fuel for the fire.


  11. ikessky

    ikessky Minister of Fire

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    I believe the Super Jack also has a secondary burn system, but I'm not sure if the size below that does or not. Keith can enlighten us on that though. I don't think the Caddy runs anything more than secondary burn does it?
    FWIW, I ran a little over 4 full cords through my Daka smoke dragon EPA exempt furnace and had less than 1/3 of a 5 gallon bucket of soot. Not too shabby for a smoke dragon in my opinion.
  12. freeburn

    freeburn Feeling the Heat

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    It all depends on the wood. How wet, how hot etc. I'd be interested as well to hear if the BJ90 has secondary burn. I know that there is no heat exchanger in it like the SJ125. Yukon needs to have better diagrams on their website, or at least a real life picture somewhere. Hint Hint.
  13. laynes69

    laynes69 Minister of Fire

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    The heat dump can be used on anything. They aren't an exclusive on a certain model of furnace. When the electricity goes out, the damper automatically closes and it goes on a low clean burn. The heat in the ducting is why all steel ducting is required and the clearances on the ducting followed. Any furnace can warp burn out due to excessive overfiring. One other thing is the Caddy produces more btus, and has a firebox half the size. Why, its efficiency and doesn't need a 7 cubic foot firebox to heat a home. The video is the exact same furnace, but was rebadged for usstove. On the 30-35 degree nights, I've been using 3 splits with coals in the morning to heat my home. Its a 2400 sq ft victorian with 10' ceilings. It would take double or more with my old furnace. I want to know how the secondary air is put into the Yukon, close that baby down and lets see how clean it burns.
  14. ikessky

    ikessky Minister of Fire

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    Hopefully Keith will come back with an answer to these questions. I don't own either stove, but may be looking at one in the not so distant future.
  15. herbdan

    herbdan New Member

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    Not to throw more wood on the fire, but have you looked at the new furnace from Blaze King? It's a CAT and is suppose to be super efficient.

    Herbster
  16. mike1234

    mike1234 New Member

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    Glad the dump can be used on anything, I'd suggest whatever someone buys they incorporate that.

    The secondary air goes in 2 ways, through the door, which is not a straight shot like your furnace, but flows that air throughout the whole door to heat it, before it comes out onto the fire, and also through the forced draft blower - some of that air goes straight to the fire, some goes around the firebox, superheats and dumps onto the smoke above the fire. I do close it down, and it does burn clean. You could of read all this in the manual, but the diagram is not totally clear.

    As for BTU's I heat a 4800 sq ft house, ok insulation, 4000 finished, with the living room with 25' ceilings with my furnace in an uninsulated garage. 3 splits on a 35 degree night is good, you could do the same thing with the superjack. As I was shopping for a furnace, I noticed that the BTU's listed may be inflated.

    Trying to be neutral, not taking into account I have spent 5000 or so on a furnace and need my ego to defend that (others might try that also) I'd say:
    caddy is probably more efficient, those secondary burn tubes supply air in a better manner to the smoke. The window on the door is very cool. But those secondary burn tubes will need replacing at some point, and the smaller firebox is a drawback.
    superjack has a much bigger firebox. It also has more steal and a better way to hold onto that heat that is produced, and then transfer to the house. It is less efficient, and could benefit from some sort of secondary burn tubes, but then there would be more maintenance costs.

    If I was to buy today, I would be conflicted. I know that smaller firebox will be an issue on really cold nights, but I'd sure like to be able to see my secondary burn through the door. I have 2 friends with usstove furnaces, and the yukon is miles better than theirs, but they don't have the caddy, they have older, lighter, much more inefficient models.

    So to answer the original poster - biggenius29 - if I was in your shoes, and my house was under 3000 sq ft and well insulated, I'd go with the caddy, if it was over 3000 sq ft or if it was poorly insulated, I'd go with the superjack. That's just what I would do.



  17. laynes69

    laynes69 Minister of Fire

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    I don't believe in forced draft. You can supercharge a fire, and burn through wood like theres no tommorrow. I had one on the old furnace, and I will tell you I cut my burn times in half with it running. One problem there is you are throwing cold air onto a fire. If you did have a good secondary burn area, you cool it too much to burn the smoke with it running. The Caddy has 2 draft tubes below the loading door in the front. They go under the firebox, behind the firebox, through the firebox then into the tubes, which there are 4 of them. They are made of a high grade stainless, along with the rails in the furnace which will stand up to high temps in the unit. Some stove companies use a fiber board baffle that breaks easily and deteriotates, where the Caddy has a 4 layer insulated stainless baffle. Hours after the fire burns out, the furnace is still warm. The Caddy has the airwash for the glass which is primary thats preheated. It burns the wood from the front to the back completely. The secondary air is fixed, and is always there promoting a clean burn. My old woodfurnace would have heated quicker than this one, but for the fear of a chimney fire, and its appetite for wood I choose what I choose. I agree with the post if you have a huge home, then the caddy may not be for you, but you wouldn't regret the choice. I was drawn back by the firebox size, but the btus are there from the new designs. Its nothing to hear of a good 10 to 12 hour burn out of a EPA stove with the same size firebox. So that pretty much sums it up. There are positives and negatives of either so good luck. Theres an owner here in ohio that heated a 3000 square foot poorly insulated home with his caddy. Take in account the weather for your area.
  18. ikessky

    ikessky Minister of Fire

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    Great info on both furnaces guys! I appreciate the descriptions. I'm sure by the time my Daka is done though, I'll have forgotten all of this!
  19. cenzino

    cenzino Member

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    Great info guys. Does anybody know if the caddy offers domestic hot water coil/rod?
  20. laynes69

    laynes69 Minister of Fire

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    It doesn't but could drill 2 holes and insert a heated water loop for hot water. Not sure if it would void the warranty. It could be placed between the top of the firebox and below the secondary heat exchanger without drilling into the main firebox, just the jacket around the firebox.
  21. CrappieKeith

    CrappieKeith New Member

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    just another tid bit....I know of guys that live in northern Mn. that heat their entire 3500 s/f home with 12 hour burn times....actually longer because of the 8" bed of coal they are loading wood on before they go to bed and when they wake up.
  22. ikessky

    ikessky Minister of Fire

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    Does the Big Jack have secondary burn also?
  23. lexybird

    lexybird Minister of Fire

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    this is probably why the caddy uses a higher draft column than the yukon uses ,it needs it because it uses a natural draft principle (simple effective and no forced blower fans to use up more energy )the outdoor wood boiler guys know this all to well when you run a forced draft blower to heat things up in the firebox its going to eat up wood over say cracking the lower ash door open
  24. laynes69

    laynes69 Minister of Fire

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    Yes exactly. Our furnace requires a better draft due to the design of the furnace. Many stove owners have few complaints until upgrading to something that EPA certified. Its all in the design. Our old furnace very little draft it would be fine. This one just because it has a higher draft doesn't mean the fire burns quicker. There are multiple places that air must be drawn into the firebox for proper combustion. Forced draft units are good on OWB's where people burn green wood, but with a furnace they work but use the wood in the process.
  25. CrappieKeith

    CrappieKeith New Member

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    Yes it does.
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