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Queen Anne 6 advise please!

Post in 'Classic Wood Stove Forums (prior to approx. 1993)' started by pirate jayne, Jun 29, 2013.

  1. pirate jayne

    pirate jayne New Member

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    coventry
    Hi, I have no idea whether I am on the right forum as this is my first forum ever!! I live on a narrowboat and at a boat gathering today bought a beautiful ueen Anne 6 stove. It seems complete but I wondered if the semi circle plate serves a purpose? It was just on the front herth bit when displayed as though it was just ornate but I thought that there may be something to close the front of the fire to enable it to draw? Any advise would be greatly appreciated. I was told that it was 1960 approx. Is there anyway you can tell if is original or a cast?

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  2. BrotherBart

    BrotherBart Hearth.com LLC Mid-Atlantic Division Staff Member

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    I think you are right. No experience with the stove but being a coal stove you would have to close the front to get a draft up through the coal bed.
  3. coaly

    coaly Fisher Moderator Staff Member

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    Without a picture, I'm guessing it's an air intake above the grate ? This is called secondary air.
    All coal stoves burn on a grate with intake air coming up through the firebed. Unlike wood that will burn geting air from any direction, coal requires oxygen to come up through it. As the coal heats, it gives off a flamable gas that should be ignited, and burns with a blue flame above the coal bed. This is only possible whan a secondary air inlet ABOVE the firebed allows oxygen to mix with the coal gas to burn. Normally most of the oxygen is used up during combustion in the coal bed itself, so a very little amount is required to light off this gas. This blue flame adds to the heat output instead of going up the chimney without igniting. When you bank the fire, or burn it slow, the coal pile will only glow. When you give it more air for more heat, the blue flames appear. When adding coal on a small wood fire to start it, the secondary should be closed allowing as much air up through the fire to get it going.
    Opening the secondary too far will allow cooler indoor air to rush up the chimney cooling the flue, slowing the fire. This is sometimes needed after cooking to slow the draft, which slows the air coming through the coal bed. Or for longer overnight burns when a minimal fire is needed.
  4. BrotherBart

    BrotherBart Hearth.com LLC Mid-Atlantic Division Staff Member

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    I believe this is the stove she has. It is an anthracite coal burner.

    [​IMG]
  5. Billybonfire

    Billybonfire Feeling the Heat

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  6. pirate jayne

    pirate jayne New Member

    Joined:
    Jun 29, 2013
    Messages:
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    Loc:
    coventry
    Thank you all!! :) Yes that is the one (black) and the browner one below seems to have the plate up but any slight movement and it falls down. Any one know if that is normal or whether I am missing a clasp/latch or something?
  7. Caedmon

    Caedmon New Member

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    Jul 13, 2013
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    1
    Loc:
    Yorkshire
    Hi guys, I bought my Queen 6 years ago - it has kinda rusted slightly due to damp room but not too bad - white vinegar should shift the rust no problem. I wonder if anyone can help with where to purchase fire bricks in UK for it - and the best paint to make it look gorgeous again.

    Thanks.

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