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question about moving heat from stove room

Post in 'The Hearth Room - Wood Stoves and Fireplaces' started by rygar, Nov 4, 2013.

  1. USMC80

    USMC80 Minister of Fire

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    what temp are you running the Clyde at? You should be running full loads with a complete burn cycle.

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  2. Grisu

    Grisu Minister of Fire

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    The best and most efficient way to operate a modern stove is to load it up once you have established a nice bed of coals and the stove is warm. Recycling another post of mine:
    See that you have a good bed of hot coals and a warm stove before loading it for the night. Put as many splits as you can fit in up to the top of the firebricks maybe leaving only a 1.5 to 2 inch gap to the burn tubes in the top. Let the wood catch fire and start a good burn, then close door. Leave the air all the way open until the wood is fully engulfed then start to stepwise close the air, maybe a quarter every 5 min. When the air is completely closed you should have nice secondaries in the top of the firebox and the stove top should read 400 to 500 F. If you have lots of cold coals left in the morning it could mean that your wood is not fully seasoned, check it with a moisture meter.

    In the morning put on more than one log, a bunch of smaller splits filling half to 2/3 of the firebox would be better. Leave the air open a little bit (but not all the way once you have a good fire) to get a quick hot fire going; that should get the stove and the house back up fast. Once that fire dies down fill the stove up again similar to what I described for an overnight burn and let it cruise during the day. I manage to do a quick, hot fire in the morning (~2 h), two fill-ups during the day (~6 h each) and one overnight burn (~10 h) with nice dry hardwood.
  3. mass_burner

    mass_burner Minister of Fire

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    @mass_burner...the left side of the house faces almost due north and the temps lastnight hit low 30s

    that's part of the issue. that side of the house gets little sun and bears the brunt of wind/cold air movement. you should consider an evergreen tree stand or panel screen to deflect wind along those walls.
  4. mass_burner

    mass_burner Minister of Fire

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    so at 7am when you wake up, what's the temp in LR, Kitchen and den?
  5. USMC80

    USMC80 Minister of Fire

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    I really think the clyde should be able to keep that house toasty, especially with temps only in the 30s at night.
  6. mass_burner

    mass_burner Minister of Fire

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    how much insulation in ther attic? was it air sealed? do you have a basement, how big? how old is the house? plastic sheeting didn't work for me.
  7. Grisu

    Grisu Minister of Fire

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    In principle, I agree that it should be able to do more than it seems to be doing. 69 F close to the stove are not that impressive. However, I am wondering how cold the house gets during the day. If it is below 60 and the Clyde is busy getting everything warmed up during the evening I can understand when it struggles to get the bedrooms warm. It also looks like a big, masonry interior fireplace. That will suck a lot of heat until it is warm. I have a similar setup and from a cold start it takes about 3 hours before the house starts to get really warm. It is nice in the morning though when the brick still radiates the heat while the stove is pretty much out.
    HatboroPaul likes this.
  8. brakatak

    brakatak Member

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    I am very similar to you in house size, layout, rookie status, and stove size (Enviro Boston 1700 insert, 2.5cu.ft. box).

    Reading your experience is similar to mine so far. I think its difficult to have high expectations when starting cold ever night. Takes a while to get eveything going hot. And once your stove room (mine is 600sq ft open area) finally gets heated, the heat will then start to spread to other areas down the hall, etc. I been using a ceiling fan to help circulation. Your layout looks similar with stove in big open area..

    I remember originaly being worried about over-heating, but so far, I cant get the stove room past 75 and adjacent rooms only around 68-72. This is with outside temps of 25. These temperatures are comfortable for me, so I am not complaining. But I was expecting warmer temps if I wanted them. I think that is attainable if i was burning 24/7 and continually reloading every 5 hours. But so far, I am only burning nights and weekends. The nightly cold start is the biggest drawback in my opinion. Basically starting the heating process over each night.

    My schedule is load up at 6pm and have heat pumping until about 11pm (5 hours), then have reload at 11 before bed.
    I can get 8-10 hour burn times, but the last couples hours seem to be mostly coals burning, with little heat. Basically I get good heat for the first 4-5 hours.

    Anyways, the Clydesdale is an awesome looking stove and gets great reviews. It was on my short list. I'm sure once you become more familar with it, performance will increase. Seems there is a big learning curve the first year.
  9. USMC80

    USMC80 Minister of Fire

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    I too have a similar setup just smaller about 1200 sq, interior masonry fireplace My thermostat in the next room pushes 76 degrees running a full load with outside temps in the high 20's. Keep in mind I have a smaller insert 2.3 ft. Back bedroom without any floor fans gets to about 67 degrees.

    With a full load of seasoned wood I would think his stove room and living room would easily hit 70 degrees. I have to wonder how he is running it, small loads?
  10. maple1

    maple1 Minister of Fire

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    Stoves are space heaters, and I see a lot of spaces in the floor plan.

    I also would expect to see warmer temps in the room closest to the stove, however. Are you sure your wood is dry?
    USMC80 likes this.
  11. mass_burner

    mass_burner Minister of Fire

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    the critical issues of why a house is cold starts way before you light a single stick of wood. i have a 1.5 cu ft box and after about 1 hour it is 72 d 6 ft all around the stove, after 2 hours it 72 everywhere in that half of the house. i also have a 3' x 15' floor to ceiling all stone/brick chimney. its the baseline that's important. I don't heat half of my house past 10-11pm. When I woke this morning, with an overnight low of 28d, it was 66 in that half of the house. So getting to 72 from there isn't that hard.
  12. Dave A.

    Dave A. Minister of Fire

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    Sometimes it's just not worth it driving yourself crazy to have the wood stove provide all of the heat for the house when it just can't do it. Even if you do augment with the oil at times, you need to keep in mind, that you are using a lot less oil than you would without the stove.
    Grisu likes this.
  13. Bster13

    Bster13 Minister of Fire

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    Has anyone else tried this? Maybe it'd work on a calm day, but goes against my logic. Thx.

  14. Dave A.

    Dave A. Minister of Fire

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    I suspect part of the problem is that you're not really getting the stove hot enough. That size stove should be able to heat your size house and layout. But from the temps in your main room, if you want the bedrooms warmer, you're prolly going to have to get the main room a little warmer. I'd be shooting to get the temp of 65 in the LR area closer to 70F. And if you fully load the stove and let it run on high longer to get it hotter, you should be putting out enough heat to warm up that main room to higher temp, imo, you may be cutting it back too soon or too much.
  15. rygar

    rygar New Member

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    this morning it was about 63.5-64 degrees
  16. rygar

    rygar New Member

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    i dont do a full load, i have a friend with a wood stove who was telling me to do one log at a time.
    this is feel is a big part of the problem. i am glad and very appreciative with every ones input. It is good to have input from seasoned veterans.
  17. mass_burner

    mass_burner Minister of Fire

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    is that without running the stove past 11pm?
  18. USMC80

    USMC80 Minister of Fire

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    Bingo! Load her up!!! I guarantee she will heat your house up nicely. Should see that den and living room in the 70s
  19. USMC80

    USMC80 Minister of Fire

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    now to find out what you did to piss your friend off :p
  20. rygar

    rygar New Member

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    that was me loading up the box and doing an overnight burn. well not totally full did the old log cabin with the center hollow
  21. rygar

    rygar New Member

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    well he did let me borrow his splitter which did all the heavy work for me so i will let him pass.
  22. Grisu

    Grisu Minister of Fire

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    I fear he is burning wet wood. If your wood is not seasoned and you pack the stove full with it you will certainly just get a smoldering mess. One log at a time may be the only way to keep the fire going.
  23. Grisu

    Grisu Minister of Fire

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    Pack it tight as I described it above. The more it looks like one wooden block (within reason) the better.
  24. USMC80

    USMC80 Minister of Fire

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    if thats the case you have to find yourself some real seasoned wood thats been split and stacked for a while, and start cutting now for next year
  25. USMC80

    USMC80 Minister of Fire

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    how long has this wood your burning been split and stacked? What kind of wood is it?

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