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Question on clearance

Post in 'The Hearth Room - Wood Stoves and Fireplaces' started by Curtis Koble, Dec 3, 2005.

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  1. Curtis Koble

    Curtis Koble New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 2, 2005
    Messages:
    20
    Hi,
    I’m ready to install a Regency 2400 insert. The only problem I think I have is the clearance to the top facing. It needs to be 12”. I will have exactly 12” to the bottom of some wood trim after the stove is in. The trim sticks out only 1.25”. I would hate to remove this trim. Do you think it would pass an inspection? The installer is telling me I don’t need to get it inspected but I think it's better that I do. I will try to attach a photo as it might help . By the way GREAT SITE

    Thanks
    Curt

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  2. elkimmeg

    elkimmeg Guest

    Your installer should not be in business. We all know permits are required. Who is he to advise differently?
    Sounds like someone that covers up shoddy work or installations and does not want to be found out as so
    Boy if there was a situation where permits were required, your number one reason would to protect your self from a bad installer
    Make sure you hold final payment till the install passes inspection.
    The 12" I do have good news the measurement is taken from the stove body an not the top removable top that gives you additional clearance distances if it says 12" in your manual you should be ok. While you are reading that manual on page one or two you will find the Code requirements. Since it is so obious then I guess your installer also can"t read.

    Good luck as I feel you may need some
  3. wg_bent

    wg_bent Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Nov 19, 2005
    Messages:
    2,248
    Loc:
    Poughkeepsie, NY
    I had a similar situation. If you look at the pictures forum..."before the Osburn" you'll see that I removed all the combustable stuff and replaced it with cement board..and it will eventually get a tile facing. I don't want to burn down my house. I think Elks position is pretty good. Do it right.
  4. Curtis Koble

    Curtis Koble New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 2, 2005
    Messages:
    20
    Unfortunately I agree with the installer part. Ordered the stove and everything was fine. Then as I learned a bit more and asked Questions and the snags started. Like the protection I will need in the front of the hearth. I dont trust this guy anymore but its to late as the money is down and the stove is due next week. Although I still don’t want to remove that molding unless it will not be code. Could I make up a small mantle shield just below it to pass? Thanks again
    Curt
  5. elkimmeg

    elkimmeg Guest

    that is possible a small mantel shield. Should have visited this forum before I guess I have to post my primers for new stove buyers again
  6. webbie

    webbie Seasoned Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Nov 17, 2005
    Messages:
    12,271
    Loc:
    Western Mass.
    Yes, look carefully at the manual and exactly what surface they are referring to..as Elk says, it is usually the top of the stove, not the panels since various size panels are often available.

    If you have 12", then that is fine - chances are you will never burn as hot as the lab!

    But if you have less, a small mantle shield as Elk suggests should do the job. This shield can sometimes be slipped behind the top insert panel. It should come out far enough to cut off the direct line of sight beteen the stove top and the first few inches of upper wood trim.

    After the stove is in and running HOT, check your installation by holding your hand on the wood. Rule of thumb is that it can be hot (and it will be), BUT you should be able to hold your finger on it for at least a few seconds. This would put it at 130 degrees or below, which is about 50 degrees below the max temperature that combustibles are allowed to be in most lab testing.

    Extending the hearth will be easy - a piece of slate, bluestone, pre-fab stove board, etc - depends on how far your stove sticks out. If it sticks out really far (like it's less than 6" from the hearth end,), be sure to use something insulated - for instance a piece of cement board with tile on top, or underneath the slate. The reason is that you have to protect it from more than just embers that might pop out, you must protect from the intense radiant heat that comes out the glass.

    Again, you can check for some kind of safetly by monitoring the surfaces after you burn the stove for awhile.
  7. Curtis Koble

    Curtis Koble New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 2, 2005
    Messages:
    20
    Warren nice pics and nice job. I definitely will have the 12” from the top of the stove to the bottom of the trim. Oh by the way, in my town you also need approval from the county fire marshal. I will let you know what the inspectors say. Thank you all for your help. Learning a lot in this forum.
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