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questions on building a wood gasification fire box

Post in 'The Boiler Room - Wood Boilers and Furnaces' started by waynecub, Mar 1, 2008.

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  1. waynecub

    waynecub New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 1, 2008
    Messages:
    29
    Loc:
    vermont
    I have enjoyed reading all of the questions and answers that you all have.
    I have in my past worked for a company that builds wood gasification systems called Chiptec.
    The systems are used in schools and saw mills, mostly anyone who has axes to wood waste.
    The systems that Chiptec builds range in size from 1 million to 50 million BTU. ( Big boys )
    At the school where I work we burn wood chips in a gasifire.( 3 million BTU unit, 90hp ).
    If we burn oil it cost us $ 350.00 a day to heat, and if we burn wood chips it cost $ 100.00 a day to heat the school. And no smoke from the wood chip system.
    I am a steel fabricator and I am building a wood gasificator that I will weld right to the side of my Frank's wood boiler. This unit is the same size as my wood boiler. It will be a down burn. The gasifire will be lined with refractory. ( Bottom, sides and top ) To get true gasification you need refractory. So here is my question I am not sure what size the secondary air nozzle needs to be in the refractory. Like 1" by 8" long? MY gasifire look a lot like the Econoburn. Can anyone tell me what size the opening is in the refractory that is called the nozzle.

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  2. Nofossil

    Nofossil Moderator Emeritus

    Joined:
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    Loc:
    Addison County, Vermont
    Building your own may be more complicated than you would think. The total amount of air needs to be controlled as well as the ratio between primary and secondary air. The nozzle cross section determines the approximate output, but needs to be correctly balanced with the primary and secondary airflows. A refractory lined secondary combustion chamber seems to be common practice, but refractory is not commonly used in the primary chamber except in the floor.

    1" x 8" is the right general ballpark for about 100,000 BTU/hr, I think.
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