Rangeley Owners, I just want to know...

ChelseaFC Posted By ChelseaFC, Jan 13, 2013 at 9:31 PM

  1. ChelseaFC

    ChelseaFC
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    Mar 22, 2011
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    I own a Rangeley for over two years and love it. But how do you all burn? Your process?

    I rake coals to front and load north/south. I noticed wood doesn't burn that good in the back of the stove, hence the need to push forward the coals. Seems air enters only in the front of the stove.

    I limit the temp to 500 deg., and scared to take it up further. Reason is because I have seem the tubes glow when it goes above that. Is it normal for those tubes to glow?

    I'm a city boy, so i consider myself new to burning. Please be gentle.
     
  2. begreen

    begreen
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    Many stoves only feed air from the front. That's pretty normal. You can take the stove top up another 100-150 deg. without worry if you need the extra heat. The tubes may glow. That also is not uncommon.
     
  3. Woody Stover

    Woody Stover
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    I prefer to run a stove as gently as possible as long as it's heating the space well...
     
  4. ChelseaFC

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    What about the idea of turning the air all the way down after filling the box up and letting it burn for 15 min or so...?

    Will this create a bad burning environment for an overnight burn?
     
  5. NortheastAl

    NortheastAl
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    ChelseaFC, I believe that the Rangeley is a double wall stove, (that being a steel stove wrapped in a cast iron outer wall.) Your stovetop temps may not reflect accurately because of that. They could actually be hotter than you are reading. I would check the manual to see if you need to use stovetop or flue temps to achieve the proper burn. Also, check my thinking on it being cast over steel. I remember that when the salesperson showed me the stove a few months ago.
     
  6. Dutch

    Dutch
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    I have a the very similar Carabasset from Jotul. I get the stove top over 600 each time it is loaded. It seems to be operating best when the stove top sits at about 625 for a while then gradually decreases.
     
  7. webby3650

    webby3650
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    That sounds about right. Just make sure that secondary burn is still taking place, then there is no worries about too much creosote build-up.
     
  8. begreen

    begreen
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    Agreed, but don't be a slave to the 15 minute rule. All firewood and all reloads are not equal. You have to judge the air reduction by the way the fire responds. Normally we take it down in a couple steps. Let you eyes be the guide.
     
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  9. ChelseaFC

    ChelseaFC
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    I'm interested in the overnight burn... Can't really check to see if the secondary burn is going at 4 am. My eyes are usually closed at that time.

    Any tips for before going to bed?
     
  10. webby3650

    webby3650
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    By 4 there shouldn't be much secondary going on. It's mostly coals by then.
     
  11. ChelseaFC

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    That's what I thought... thanks all.

    Just wish air some how got to the back of the fire box.
     
  12. Bub381

    Bub381
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    N/S loading worked great but couldn't keep glass clean behind andirons.
     
  13. Pallet Pete

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    The issue we had was where to place the thermometer it needs to go on the left or right on top. ( not on the top load door ) I can run 700 if I wish but there is no need to. Jotul actually recommends the thermometer be put in one of those 2 spots to read accurately. The top load door reads very hot as it is also a cooktop and can handle intense heat. Our tubes glow at times and I have discovered it is normal and has not hurt anything at all. The box is big which means big heat. The Jotul rep I talked to also explained that the reason the tube in front is wrapped is so it can handle the intense heat and that it is normal when running hot to see a glow.

    In terms of wood how dry is your wood ? It needs to be below 20% moister or it wont burn well at all in the Rangeley. We have loaded both ways and to be honest it really runs better north / south. We dont have an issue with no burning in back either which is why I ask about your wood !

    This might help too!
    http://www.hearth.com/talk/threads/jotul-f-50-thread-per-request.103435/

    Pete
     
  14. ChelseaFC

    ChelseaFC
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    Well guys, after starting this post and reading everyone's comments I now think I am doing this right!

    I'm experiencing longer burn times, higher temps, and loving the secondary burns.

    I now don't need to wake up in the middle of the night to load the box; I load less times and the heat coming from this is unreal!

    Thanks to all!
     
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  15. begreen

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    Great to hear the positive progress report. Enjoy that nice stove!
     
  16. ChelseaFC

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    Actually, one more thing... what do you guys do/use to clean the top plate?
     
  17. Bub381

    Bub381
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    Damp cloth will be fine just doesn't hurt to start a fire after to dry it.You mean the top of the stove right?
     
  18. ChelseaFC

    ChelseaFC
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    Sorry, I've been out of the country.. yes the top of the stove. I wish to get that brand new polished look, but that may be a stretch.
     
  19. Hawkeye

    Hawkeye
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    Glad to see this thread - I wanted to post this this morning: So how hot have you guys been able to get your Rangely? I have been putting the thermometer on the top load plate - the hottest I have ever been able to get it is 650. Running it "hard" I can maintain 500-550, but that is about it. And this is with the thermometer on the top plate - some of you are getting 650 with the thermometer on the side? If so, then I think you are able to get more heat from yours.

    A couple thoughts - I have the OAK on mine, does anyone else? While giving a nice air feed, I am feeding the stove with colder air. I have always wondered if this could be a factor?

    As for our chimney - it is tall. Runs enclosed through the second floor and then through a chase - total length about 20-ft. But with that, our draft sometimes bothers me. If I try to add another log after recently loading it (before it really gets going) it will spill a fair amount of smoke......anyone else have this?

    Don't get me wrong - it burns very well, and does a good job heating almost 3,000 sf. I just question it a bit........here's a pic of the install......

    Jotul F50.jpg
     
  20. cc rangeley

    cc rangeley
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    Jan 7, 2013
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    I keep my thermometer in the upper left corner. My Rangeley does a great job of heating this cathedral-ceilinged living room (with a big wall of windows) and upstairs, but I never get the thermometer to go much over 550. 450-500 is the usual temp.
     
  21. ChelseaFC

    ChelseaFC
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    I now, after starting this thread, place thermometer on top right on black and not on the plate. I now cruise with it at 500 deg.

    I also now get an overnight burn of 8 hours and there are plenty of hot coals to start it back up.

    This thread has helped out a lot for me.
     
  22. jrcurto

    jrcurto
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    At its peak I see 600 on the stovetop with two thermometers in different places. 800 on the flue probe right at the outlet. Cruising between 400-500. As far as the back of the stove and loading, I rake the coals forward and push back from the front to create a berm. For morning kickoff, If I load 3 splits N-S and then 2 E-W on top of that berm... off we go. Crack the door if needed but stay right there in front of the fire and close tight asap. If the coals are really dim, I make a tunnel through the berm to force air through. Whoever first published the tunnel concept here is brilliant, my son always volunteers to to that for me now, and it works so good. I stir my coals everytime to burn down before reload, those chunks get hot. For banking the overnight, the bare spot in back of the berm is where I put a large dry blocky split and pack the coals around it before finishing the full reload. Let it fire off for at least 30 min and bring the air down to 1/4. I have the blower kit, dont like it. I finally put a ceiling fan in the stove room and that has made a huge difference in moving heat. And of course to reiterate the central law, dry your firewood for years, keep it dry, and get more.

    Jim
     
  23. cmperry

    cmperry
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    I listened to a retired professor(professor Dick Hill) who taught at the University of Maine/mechanical engineering dept. for 46 yrs.He spoke about outside air for wood stoves during a question and answer period. If it was me I would get rid of the oak. I normally hit 625-650 on the top load plate on a normal burn cycle.
     
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  24. Bub381

    Bub381
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    1 more thing,get you a couple flat magnets or what have ya to plug that secondary,center bottom and back of the stove.It will come in handy in 1 of those (what the hell) moments.
     

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