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Ranger clutch question

Post in 'DIY and General non-hearth advice' started by begreen, Mar 30, 2013.

  1. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    South Puget Sound, WA
    Agreed that the slave seals are likely getting old. But they still work great. I may just continue driving it and avoid long trips when it is hot outside. It takes a couple hours in traffic at 90F to make the problem occur.

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  2. nate379

    nate379 Guest

    No, it's pretty much the same. I've rebuilt a few of the M5ODs, just been a while since I've last messed with one. I think you forget that I worked as an auto mechanic for a few years and now do it as a hobby/helping friends.

  3. gmule

    gmule Feeling the Heat

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    Conifer Colorado
    When is the last time you changed the fluid in the clutch system?

    You said that this happens when it is hot out. To the best of my knowledge those systems use dot 3 brake fluid for the hydraulics. As we know that dot 3 is hydroscopic meaning that it will attract water. Once the fluid is contaminated with water the boiling point of the fluid is lowered. When the fluid boils it creates bubbles, so when you next press the clutch pedal you will find that is has very little if any pressure applied to the slave cylinder.
  4. nate379

    nate379 Guest

    You get it fixed up? What was the actual problem?
  5. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    It's original. But I don't follow that theory.Clutch systems are not like brake systems. I strongly doubt that the fluid ever gets close to it's boiling point.
  6. gmule

    gmule Feeling the Heat

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    453
    Loc:
    Conifer Colorado
    Dot 3 boils at 205 degrees. Might be worth it to hit those components with the IR gun to see what the temps really are. I would check the line temp at the slave cylinder.
  7. nate379

    nate379 Guest

    DOT 3 fresh out of the bottle boils at about 400*F, gmule, I think your # is in C* maybe? Dunno what the conversion is off the top of my head.

    But most brake fluid is hygroscopic (DOT 3 and 4 is). Water in the fluid means lower boil temp (plus rusting out the fittings and lines over time)

    It's supposed to be flushed out every 2-3 years... in both brake and clutch systems. Not saying it's the cause of the problem, but just a heads up on the preventative maintenance.

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