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RE: Soot from oak . . . gotta ask

Post in 'The Wood Shed' started by firefighterjake, Nov 5, 2012.

  1. firefighterjake

    firefighterjake Minister of Fire

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    Under the For Sale/Wanted a new member is looking for soot from oak . . . I'm still scratching my head trying to figure this one out.

    Any guesses as to what one would use soot from oak for . . . originally I was thinking maybe they meant ash from oak to make soap or something . . . but I cannot imagine anyone looking specifically for ash even.

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  2. CageMaster

    CageMaster Feeling the Heat

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    I do know that some people have asked for my ash before to use for roosters...apparently they "dust" themselves by rolling in it



    read this article http://omniskies.com/quail.shtml
  3. tcassavaugh

    tcassavaugh Minister of Fire

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    i know when i was a kid growing up, my folks used to take the ash and put it in the garden. supposed to help put back some of the mineral or ph...think it might be a poor mans fertilizer not sure.

    cass
  4. clemsonfor

    clemsonfor Minister of Fire

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    It helps raise the PH when used in a garden, like lime. Also the Carbon in it will help bind up soil toxins and such, and also will help add something that will also it to get space in soil particles hold moisture better and some of the coal will further breakdown helping to release somestuff into the soil.
  5. firefighterjake

    firefighterjake Minister of Fire

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    Didn't realize oak soot specifically was good . . .
  6. Jags

    Jags Moderate Moderator Staff Member

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    Jake - unless there is some specific use for it that I am unaware of, I doubt it was soot they were looking for. Probably the ash. Soot is really pretty nasty stuff with lots of yucky stuff in it. I sure as heck wouldn't be putting on a food plot or anything.
  7. tcassavaugh

    tcassavaugh Minister of Fire

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    never heard of that one before...

    cass
  8. mesuno

    mesuno Member

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    Might they be talking about biochar?
    http://www.woodstovewizard.com/biochar.html

    Adding black carbon (charcoal, soot etc...) to soil has been shown to boost soil fertility over the long term in some soils. I'm not sure why they would want oak char specifically.

    Ash on the other hand contains potassium and lots of other nice trace metals that plants need as part of their metabolic processes. Metals in ash tend to be fairly water soluble too, so can be easily absorbed by plant roots.
  9. EatenByLimestone

    EatenByLimestone Minister of Fire

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    Oak... I wonder if it has anything to do with brewing? White Oak casks and chips are used to flavor alcohol. I know the oak casks are charred on the inside. I wonder if the OP asked for the wrong substance.
  10. basod

    basod Minister of Fire

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    This came to my mind as well.
    Charred oak flavor in moonshine is pretty common...not that i know anything about that though
  11. BrotherBart

    BrotherBart Hearth.com LLC Mid-Atlantic Division Staff Member

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    There are a number of questionable things about that post. So I have pulled it till the boss can take a look at it.
  12. Jags

    Jags Moderate Moderator Staff Member

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    Nope - the use in brewing booze requires the tannins to be available. As the booze moves in and out of the walls of the barrels the tannins are dissolved into the booze (gives color and flavor). That is also why they are only a one use item for whiskey. Ash will have virtually no tannins left and soot would be undesirable as well.

    Charcoal - different thing.
  13. milleo

    milleo Feeling the Heat

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    I was thinking the same thing but didn't know who to go to. " Gut feeling ".
  14. DanCorcoran

    DanCorcoran Minister of Fire

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    When I lived in a country which didn't permit the sale of alcohol, some resourceful folks made their own grain alcohol (stainless steel stills, copper condensers, etc.). A common flavoring was to take oak chips (sometimes sold for barbecue grills), toast them in the oven, let them soak in the grain alcohol for a few weeks, then filter them out. They imparted a golden brown color and a yummy taste...so I'm told (;)).
    milleo and basod like this.
  15. Backwoods Savage

    Backwoods Savage Minister of Fire

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    Still do.
  16. Backwoods Savage

    Backwoods Savage Minister of Fire

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    Just to to any of the mods if questionable and let them do their thing.
    milleo likes this.
  17. ailanthus

    ailanthus Feeling the Heat

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    Mix with used motor oil for fence or barn paint? I think that's usually creosote, but maybe that's what it's about.

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