Really Good Fire Going - Jotul Castine

mmichaud Posted By mmichaud, Sep 28, 2006 at 4:26 AM

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  1. Roospike

    Roospike
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    Nov 19, 2005
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    There is a dollar bill test. You shut the door on a dollar bill half sticking out and see if you can pull it out with ease or its a snug fit. Reopen the door to replace the dollar bill and start over doing the whole door gasket. If you have a spot that the dollar bill pulls out easily then you might be looking to replace the door seal gasket.
     
  2. JMF1

    JMF1
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    Oct 1, 2006
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    Another thing I'd like to add.........when I had the high temps, it seemed to be all secondary burn going on, no flame from the wood. I understand that you get that when the air is restricted. Would that indicate me leaving it on high too long rather than poor gaskets?
     
  3. Roospike

    Roospike
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    Nov 19, 2005
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    yes, I would think so.
     
  4. BrotherBart

    BrotherBart
    Hearth.com LLC Mid-Atlantic Division 2.
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    Nov 18, 2005
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    That sounds like a severely over-drafting chimney. What is the chimney set-up on that stove?
     
  5. kevinlp

    kevinlp
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    Aug 9, 2006
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    Last night, I made a good fire to get the paint all cured so I don't have to worry about any smoking. I definately did that. Stove peak at 700-750. I never really saw the secondary burn going except when I turned the air all the way down. But at that point there was no flame on the wood, so I think that was too low. Only did it for a few minutes.

    I found that the right mix of air was at 10-20%. I put two logs on before bed, wasn't trying for an overnight burn, just checking to see what duration I would get. I happen to wake up at 1:15 and I ran out to check the stove and there was still enough coals to reloaded if desired. Surface temp was still 200. So I go ~5 hours out of those two logs. They were only 12" or so. My firebox isn't that huge but I could have fit two more. If I fill it and use larger size pieces, I feel good about being able to get an overnight burn.
     
  6. JMF1

    JMF1
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    Oct 1, 2006
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    Bart, I have the stove in the fireplace with a 6in stainless chimney liner. The liner itself isn't insulated, but the chimney is at the top plate and in the fireplace flue. The outside temp here last night was high 40's, maybe low 50's or so. This thing was really crankin with just 3 logs in it and the air control pulled all the way out, I was worried. I woke up this morning at 7:30, surface temp was 150 degrees, bed of coals still there, so I pushed air control in and it got nice and red......let it burn out from there.
     
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