Red Oak Split Size

Post in 'The Wood Shed' started by bgoodwithwood, Apr 11, 2013.

  1. bgoodwithwood

    bgoodwithwood
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    Just received some red oak from a arborist friend for the cost of some gas to get it to me. I have a ryobi electric splitter which will do the job after I finish bucking it all. I am estimating maybe 1.5 cords of beautiful stuff with not a bug or any rot to be found. I need some advice on split size as I have heard the smaller the diameter the faster it will season but I like the larger splits for overnight burns as I heat 24/7. Is there a split size that is "best" for red oak? Two years for seasoning time?? Thank you in advance:)
     
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  2. Locust Post

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    Medium size split (about 6") if you want to burn in 2 years. 3 years is optimal for oak but 2 will work if you get it stacked in some good wind.
     
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  3. Applesister

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    If you are familiar with the temperment of your stove you would split for burn times. I imagine. Drying? Ive split wood small in the past only to feel Ive ruined it..
     
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  4. paul bunion

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    Exactly. Split it for the overnight burn. Don't make kindling out of it.
     
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  5. bogydave

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    For nice size rounds. I like to get some 4" X 6" s to 6" X 6" s out of them.
    Stack nice & burn a long time ;)
    Longer drying time though. Especially oak.
     
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  6. Woody Stover

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    I would go four-inch (triangular) splits if you want to try to burn fresh Oak in two years. If three years, maybe a little bigger. I didn't like the super-huge splits for my stove...
     
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  7. mywaynow

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    Split in in a variety of sizes. A little excess moisture won't be the end of the world on larger splits. It hisses out early in the burn. You would want some smaller pieces to use as fillers anyhow. It is hard to thoroughly fill a box with all large splits. It will all be coals in the morning anyway.
     
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  8. Backwoods Savage

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    For only 2 years drying time, I'd split nothing over 4" thickness and preferably 3". If you have more time, then you could split some larger as I agree that the larger pieces are great for night burning. One thing you could do is split some larger but stack those separate. Make sure they are well by themselves stacked in single rows but stack them really loose so you get good air circulation through the stack. I'd also aim for both wind and sun but wind is the big key to drying.
     
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  9. fabsroman

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    Yeah, I don't really have a problem with small split sizes. My furnace has an automatic damper so overnight burns aren't that big of an issue. Plus, I usually go to bed late and my wife wakes up early in the morning. I'm going to split the hardwood to 4" and the softer stuff to 6". They season quicker that way and light up faster too.

    What do you guys with stoves do? Does the damper stay open the same amount at night, or do you reduce it? I'll have to ask my dad about this since he is using an insert. I think he reduces the air flow at night.
     
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  10. Backwoods Savage

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    On ours, we set the draft below 1 (setting from zero to 4) and go to bed. All is well.
     
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  11. bgoodwithwood

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    Thank you all for the info!
     
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