Red Stone Eco Bricks vs Eco-Energy Fuel Blocks

Post in 'The Hearth Room - Wood Stoves and Fireplaces' started by BlueMavWood, Jan 27, 2013.

  1. wkpoor

    wkpoor
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    Some stoves are finicky eaters and some are not. I suspect if your stove is not particular about what you feed it then it won't much care what kind of bricks you use.
     
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  2. Doug MacIVER

    Doug MacIVER
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    so try them they may burn better.if they don't?
     
  3. Doug MacIVER

    Doug MacIVER
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    stack up 1# pine and 1# oak, which takes more physical space. burn 1# pine then 1# oak , which lasts longer?answer is ,in the form of a ?
    i put 16 #, 8 bricks, in the stove this morning, couldn't come close to that with splits.still alive 11 hrs later.
     
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  4. wkpoor

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    Sounds like your supporting my theory. Heavier denser fuel will allow you to pack more BTU potential into the stove. Thus the potential for longer burns.
     
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  5. Doug MacIVER

    Doug MacIVER
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    how can it not. i can't # for# put the same btu with splilts that i can with the bricks i'm using now. things burn with little space,end of story.
     
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  6. BlueMavWood

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    That may be true. I suspect that an industrial garbage incinerator might even be able to burn those Eco-Energy Fuel Blocks. TSC must have gotten a real deal on them to justify replacing Eco Bricks with those things. It's to bad that deal didn't get passed onto the consumer.
     
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  7. Newschool

    Newschool
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    Those TSC Fuel blocks stink. I'm a new burner and tried them and was really frustrated. Anyone know where I can buy better eco bricks (or the like) in eastern PA? I am in the lehigh valley can can't seem to find anything.
     
  8. wkpoor

    wkpoor
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    I guess I need to go buy a pack or 2 this weekend to see what all the hooplaw is about with these fuel blocks.
     
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  9. BlueMavWood

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    You could do a Google search for the eco brick website. They have a dealer search function (or you could contact them). If you can't find any close by then perhaps you might find envi blocks somewhere. They seem ok too. Best to try whatever you can find and see which you like best. It sure would be nice though to have a list of the different brands, with their price, and where they can be found.
     
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  10. jjs777_fzr

    jjs777_fzr
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    I'm glad I ran across the canawick bricks - they appear denser and don't fall apart like the bio bricks I was using. They also sell pellets and blocks. Place near me in Saugus,MA sells the pellets and the bricks. I'd love to try the blocks just for the heck of it. I place two bricks in with splits on top of and around and what a great fire every time. I'm definitely spoiled using both.
     
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  11. BlueMavWood

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    Can't hurt to try them. If you like them then great. Everyone has their preferance. If people like those things then how about they sell them side by side with eco bricks and give everyone a choice. That seems fair to me (but what do I know).
     
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  12. BlueMavWood

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    I was going to ask you where you got them. What type of place did you get them from (a stove dealer)? How much do they cost (perhaps you said)? What is the difference between the bricks and the blocks?
     
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  13. jjs777_fzr

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    I got them from NorthEastern Fence in MA - as the name suggests they install and sell all types of fencing. Oddly enough they sell pellets and other alternative fuel types for the hearth. At one point they carried things like night logs, bio bricks, power logs, and cedar logs.
    For the Canawick bricks I paid $292.50 after a $25 seasonal discount. It's more than I would ever pay for a ton of pellets but as I only use a few at a time per fire in the wood stove they last a long time.
    With respect to Canawick - the bricks are smaller dimensionally than the blocks I've seen on their site. I'm betting the block would create a long lasting burn.
    I hope they continue to stock the canawick product.
    Heres the link to the blocks -
    http://canawick.com/en/produits.php?cat=Blocks&c=38
     
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  14. BlueMavWood

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    Thanks. Good information.
     
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  15. jjs777_fzr

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    Just a quick update on an old thread.
    I picked up 1 ton of Canawick blocks. This is the first year I'll be trying the blocks. As I've stated elsewhere I've always been a fan of bricks and decided to try the blocks.
    For comparison there's a brick next to the block.
    Although I burn seasoned splits - I'd never run the stove without a few bricks - just seems to add to a nice burn.

    100_3833.JPG 100_3834.JPG 100_3835.JPG 100_3836.JPG
     
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  16. rcollman

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    I agree with BrotherBart. I asked for a spec sheet from the manufacture of the TS ECO blocks. A 2011 report clearly shows the block as received had a 6.7% moisture with a 8213 BTU per pound output. And shows Dry Basis as 8803 BTUs and a MAF (what ever that is, maybe the "bomb" BrotherBart mentions) of 8866 BTUs per pound.

    Of course if the block weights 1.5 pound, then I guess you could claim 12000 BTUs per block and a typo maks that per pound. The ECO blocks packaging I received clearly stated they had 8800 BTUs per pound, which is misleading in my opinion.

    I also asked for a spec sheet from Canawick but did not get one. They claim they have been tested at 7650 BTUs/pound for their bricks, blocks and logs. Yet they say the mositure content varies from 5.8% to 6.4%

    I wondered if the TS ECO block are as dense as the other products. Weight is weight but density could be a factor in them feeling "cheap" and perhaps that might impact how they burn.

    Just saying,
    Chris
     
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  17. rcollman

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    Thks for the pictures!! So what do you think now that the heating season is upon us? Do you like the blocks better than the bricks? I think with my kind of boiler I need to mix the blocks with wood.

    My neighbor discovered mixing blocks with green wood works much better than just green wood in his semi airtight stove :)
     
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  18. Brian26

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    I am heading to my local TS to stock up on some of these this morning. I burn mainly dry cord wood but these things are great for long overnight burns on those cold nights.

    They have 2 types available. The redstone ecobricks and redstone fuel blocks.

    I used the redstone fuel blocks last year and 2-3 of them put out tremendous heat all night. I caught them on sale last year for $2.99. My oil furnance would have burned down $2.99 in oil in like 40 mins. I found that they come from a hardwood flooring factory down south and they burned great. I am going to stock up on more today.

    Sounds like the Eco Bricks are good as well? I might grab a few packs to try them out. These things seem to dissapear fast from TSC so If they are good as well I might stock up on them as well.
     

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