1. Welcome Hearth.com Guests and Visitors - Please enjoy our forums!
    Hearth.com GOLD Sponsors who help bring the site content to you:
    Hearthstone Soapstone and Cast-Iron stoves( Wood, Gas or Pellet Stoves and Inserts)
    Caluwe - Passion for Fire and Water ( Pellet and Wood Hydronic and Space Heating)

request for tips on welding

Post in 'DIY and General non-hearth advice' started by infinitymike, Jul 10, 2012.

  1. bfunk13

    bfunk13 Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Sep 11, 2008
    Messages:
    764
    Loc:
    Wyoming
    TIG is the ultimate welding process. Can be used to weld anything, i got pretty good with one working for a fabrication shop. After the old timer retired, i got to do all of the TIG work. Definitely not something you just pick up and start welding with. Takes years of practice. A good TIG welder can just about name his price.

    Helpful Sponsor Ads!





  2. semipro

    semipro Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jan 12, 2009
    Messages:
    2,346
    Loc:
    SW Virginia
    My best piece of advice, one passed on from a master welder and university instructor: understand that you can't fix a bad weld with more welding.
    You might make a weld look good with additional passes but all you're really doing is hiding a problem.
    Those that believe they can "burn" out a bad weld with another pass are fooling themselves. Contaminants from rust, paint, flux, etc. that remain in the weld weaken it and have to be removed with a grinder or torch.
    I've had numerous welding classes and made many welds only to dissect them later for microscopic examination to see this first hand.
    ScotO and bfunk13 like this.
  3. bfunk13

    bfunk13 Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Sep 11, 2008
    Messages:
    764
    Loc:
    Wyoming
    True, in welding classes we would take a 1/2" x10"x10" plate and weld back and forth. For hours in each position. Basically making a 10x10x10 cube of weld. Cleaning after every pass, when we were done we would cut into thirds on a band saw to see how well we did. If you took your time with chipping,cleaning and grinding you would have very little porosity or pinholes. The guys who did not clean right had big pockets of slag and holes throughout.
    ScotO likes this.
  4. ScotO

    ScotO Guest

    Funny thing about TIG that I learned while apprenticing, is when welding a non-ferrous metal (such as aluminum which was the main metal I welded) you can't use a ferrous grinding disc or wire brush/wire wheel. You must use a stainless wire wheel to clean non-ferrous metals prior to making the weld. Use regular steel wire wheel and you had all kinds of pops, pinholes and junk in that weld. Same went with oil or grease contaminants. Any of that junk on the metal being welded and you had problems. We used to practice on the Miller TIG machine at my old job by cutting soda cans, flattening them into small square "patches, cleaning the edges, setting that welder down as low as it would go, and weld them together, end to end. Make a kind of patchwork "quilt". I wish I would have gotten a picture of one of those patchwork panels, that taught me alot about controlling the heat, and controlling the fill material. The one guy was so good he barely needed any fill material at all. Some guys are downright gifted with a TIG welder......
    bfunk13 likes this.
  5. MasterMech

    MasterMech Guest

    So long as the material is clean, fit up is excellent, and the job is inside/out of the wind, TIG does produce exceptional welds. It has it's downsides tho. Fit up and prep must be very good where as other processes will tolerate dirty metal, some wind, and less than perfect fit. When speed counts, TIG comes in dead last every time. Pulsed MIG will lay awesome welds on aluminum (they look just as good as TIG welds) with all the speed we love about MIG. Flux-Core MIG will weld outside in the wind, dirty metal, painted metal, etc. where a TIG torch wouldn't dare go. You can run a MIG torch in just about any position you can cram your body into. TIG welding overhead is miserable. Actually, whenever you must weld out of position, TIG is rough.

    So I wouldn't say TIG is the ultimate process, and neither is MIG or stick, but like anything else, pick up the right tool for the job and the results are always positive.
  6. bfunk13

    bfunk13 Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Sep 11, 2008
    Messages:
    764
    Loc:
    Wyoming
    Let me rephrase, TIG is the most versatile. Trust me i know the limitations of each process. Of course it is not the fastest or the easiest. 99% of "welders" can't even use one. Fit and prep must be good. Should be good and clean anyways. Truth is i use a Miller MIG welder for 90% of the work i do, i also have a Lincoln 110 with flux core, and a Lincoln portable stick. I would not pick TIG to weld a steel trailer or fence, or a bridge, or a stadium, but if you wanted to you could. That's my point. You could also weld aluminum foil and beer cans together if you wanted to.
    Lets see ya do that with a mig or stick.
    ScotO likes this.
  7. ironpony

    ironpony Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jan 22, 2010
    Messages:
    1,790
    Loc:
    mid-ohio via St.Croix USVI
    more heat more rod...something like that

Share This Page