1. Welcome Hearth.com Guests and Visitors - Please enjoy our forums!
    Hearth.com GOLD Sponsors who help bring the site content to you:
    Hearthstone Soapstone and Cast-Iron stoves( Wood, Gas or Pellet Stoves and Inserts)

Rich (?) chainsaw setting from factory

Post in 'The Gear' started by carpniels, Jan 16, 2008.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. carpniels

    carpniels Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Dec 6, 2005
    Messages:
    536
    Loc:
    Rome, NY, USA
    Hi Guys,

    I have a question that you guys can answer:

    I bought a new 346XP in August. I have always been told:"chainsaws are set rich from the factory during break in, so after about 10 tankloads you need to go back to the dealer and have it thinned out."

    However, I have also read here that because of EPA regulations, saws are set so poor that they are on the edge of burning themselves up.

    These two statements contradict each other. Which one is true? Or are they both true? I want to keep this saw forever, so what do I do?

    Also, I don't understand this rich/poor thing. I mix the fuel myself, so the oil is always 40:1. How can there be a difference in rich/poor? Or is this related to the air/fuel mixture? If so, I should probably set it with the screws on the carb. But how? And should I really be doing that myself instead of the dealer? And what if he screws up? Isn't it better for me to learn how to do it properly? And why should I not set it rich so that I know I will never burn it up? I will just waste a little fuel.

    Let me know

    Carpniels

    Helpful Sponsor Ads!





  2. Eric Johnson

    Eric Johnson Mod Emeritus

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2005
    Messages:
    5,745
    Loc:
    Central NYS
    Actually, it's "lean" not "poor." Don't ask me why.

    The carb should be set with a tachometer. I'd think that Kahler's would tune yours up for free, since you bought it from them. There's an optimum setting that you can achieve with a tach. Some people have a technique for doing it by ear, but just to be on the safe side, I'd rely on the instrument. No matter how it was set from the factory, after break-in, it should be set again to the optimum mix for your saw.

    Then it should last forever.
  3. struggle

    struggle Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Oct 24, 2006
    Messages:
    727
    Loc:
    NW Iowa
    When I had my lawn business in FL all the 2 cycle equipment was always set rich and the chainsaws were no different when new.

    What I have always done is after a several tanks full of fuel I would after engine is warm run saw up wide open and adjust it rich till it runs rough and lean it out until it starts to scream and then richen it a bit the point of where you notice it starts to slow a tad and leave it there.

    I have never had anything seize using this method or have to replace a unit for lack of engine performnace.

    One would really be surprised it how lean these things can run with out problems.

    I still have an old hand held blower that is now at least 14 years old that runs like new using thiat method after break in. My 019 Sthil is 11 years old and runs like a champ.
  4. MALogger

    MALogger New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 27, 2006
    Messages:
    147
    Loc:
    Foxboro, MA
    Saws are set a little rich during break in to provide a little extra lube. I set my saws by ear and just to see how close I could do it and I was within a couple hundred rpm's so with a little practice you can do it. But if your dealer is close by they should adjust it for you no charge after break in and you can hear how it sounds when set properly. Also in your post I noticed you said 40:1 mix?? I run husky and stihl saws and they all use 50:1 mix. Make sure yopu check your manual and see what mix to use. If I am not mistaken it should tell you in the manual how to adjust it.

    Craig
  5. ozarkjeep

    ozarkjeep New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 6, 2006
    Messages:
    407
    fuel/oil ratio going into the tank is different from fuel/air ratio getting mixed in the carb.

    good advice above, one thing I would ad.

    running the premix ratio at 40:1, DOES run the saw leaner ( per air/fuel) than 50:1, the extra oil takes up the space that would be fuel.

    fuel burns cooler than air.

    too lean means too much air per fuel, and thats running HOT.

    so hot it can melt a piston on the edge near the exhaust port.

    so be careful with those overly rich oil/fuel mixtures, since they DO lean out your saws fuel/air mixture.

    clear as mud huh?
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Share This Page