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Running chimney through second story bedroom?

Post in 'The Hearth Room - Wood Stoves and Fireplaces' started by joetal17, Dec 31, 2009.

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  1. joetal17

    joetal17 Member

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    So I finally found a used Avalon at the right price and now want to install in my two-story cape. Want to install the chimney through the center of the house to avoid about 15' feet of pipe sticking out of one of the corners.
    The chimney will thus have to run through a second story bedroom before going through an attic and out the roof.

    What type of pipe do I have to use for the section in the bedroom. Double layer stove pipe or chimney pipe?

    And after it's installed can I box it in?

    Thanks in advance.

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  2. NH_Wood

    NH_Wood Minister of Fire

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    This is exactly what I may need to do - so looking forward to the replies. I'm going to attempt to vent a new wood stove into an existing chimney (where the pellet stove (soon to go upstairs) is currently venting. The chimney liner is tile, but is large (12" square). I'm going to see how the stove burns in this setup during mid-March (intall time). If the chimney won't draft well (or creosote seems to build fast), my summer project is the following: run stove pipe to first floor ceiling, tie into insulated SS line in upstairs bedroom (right along chimney placement on bedroom wall), then up through the attic and roof. I plan to box in the upstairs bedroom SS liner, but would like opinions from folks on material to use - do I (and this current initial person who posted) need to use something else besides normal sheetrock? The box would likely be small - perhaps 12" wide by 18" along the wall. Not sure if durock or some type of cement board needs to be attached to the frame (or for that matter, if the frame needs to be a certain distance from the liner. Any info much appreciated (will be able to kill two projects with one stone!)
  3. Fsappo

    Fsappo Minister of Fire

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    You use class A chimney from the ceiling box to the chimney cap. Firestops floor and ceiling of the second floor. Check with your local building code, you may need to enclose it.
  4. Fsappo

    Fsappo Minister of Fire

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    Same goes for you. Use Class A only. Dont use an insulated liner boxed in. Against code.
  5. NH_Wood

    NH_Wood Minister of Fire

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    Franks - do you mean that the liner would need to be exposed within the room?
  6. Fsappo

    Fsappo Minister of Fire

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    Stove pipe to the ceiling and class A from the ceiling box thru the roof. Liner should not be part of the equation. Unless you want to use a liner for the stove pipe.
  7. NH_Wood

    NH_Wood Minister of Fire

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    Franks - okay - I'm very new to this and I'm not sure what Class A is, relative to an SS liner. I'll have to do some reading! That said - whatever goes from second floor to second floor ceiling - does it remain exposed?
  8. Fsappo

    Fsappo Minister of Fire

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    Sorry. Class A chimney is a 2100 degree insulated chimney system. Sometimes called by one of the brand names Metalbestos. So you have the first floor where the stove is. From the stove to the ceiling, you use whats called "smoke pipe" this can be single wall or double wall. That attaches to a ceiling support box that is mounted in the ceiling. On the top side of the box in the second story is where you start your class A chimney system and continue with that pipe right thru the roof and to the chimney cap. If you do a search you'll find owners manuals for class A chimney all over the place..or there exists these magical places that are slowly becoming extinct. They are called Hearth Shops. As new as you are, and considering we are dealing with fire and stuff, I would suggest walking into one of these Hearth Shops and letting them advise you on your project. You can even buy the items you need right there! I know it doesnt make much sense, being you can save a few bucks at some online random warehouse, but think of the extra money as a donation to a fund that will keep that same hearth shop around for you or the next person that needs friendly local advice.

    Check with your local building codes official about boxing the pipe in as it passes thru the second floor
  9. NH_Wood

    NH_Wood Minister of Fire

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    Franks - thank you for the advice - I'm working through the learning curve on many terms, etc. Will discuss with my stove shop when I head in for a stove purchase next week! Thanks again and cheers!
  10. madison

    madison Minister of Fire

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    class a and enclosed in living areas where the pipe can be "touched" ie, second story closets, bedrooms etc.
  11. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    On the first floor, between the stove and the ceiling support box, the connector pipe can be single or double-wall depending on clearances required, budget, draft needs, etc. From the ceiling support box in the 1st floor ceiling to the flue cap, high-temp class A pipe is required. Here's a picture from the Simpson installation guide.

    Attached Files:

  12. NH_Wood

    NH_Wood Minister of Fire

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    Okay - figured it would have to be boxed in, but a few posts seemed to suggest otherwise (probably my poor take on the post!). Thanks for you input.
    Anyone have any input on materials used to box in the Class A in the bedroom?
  13. NH_Wood

    NH_Wood Minister of Fire

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    BeGreen - perfect - thanks much for the figure of the install - will help greatly when (and if!) I have to go through the ceiling! Cheers!
  14. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    Typically the chase (box) is made with 2x3 or 2x4 framing and sheetrocked over. The 2x's and sheetrock must be at least 2" away from the pipe on all sides. Note, it's important to thoroughly vacuum out any debris and sawdust before putting up the sheetrock.
  15. NH_Wood

    NH_Wood Minister of Fire

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    Once again, thank you for the extra input! Cheers!
  16. LLigetfa

    LLigetfa Minister of Fire

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    I use metal studs to build the chase. Fire code may require that the chase have a 2 hour burn rating. There was some debating with my building inspector what constitutes a 2 hour burn rating and that venting a chase nullifies the burn rating.

    I vented my chase in my former home and reclaimed a significant amount of heat from the flue. In my current home the chase goes through our master bedroom WIC and while I wanted to reclaim some heat, I did not want too much heat so I ran a metal radiation shield the length of the chase and then vented the chase to the closet. The full length radiation shield met the 2 hour burn rating requirement and the drywall chase was mostly cosmetic.
  17. NH_Wood

    NH_Wood Minister of Fire

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    I like the metal stud suggestion. How is the vent set up on the chase in your application? I had thought of doing the same thing in order to get some extra heat into the bedroom. Did you use a vent that can close? Bottom or top of chase? Any extra info is welcome! Cheers!
  18. LLigetfa

    LLigetfa Minister of Fire

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    One vent (9"x13") on the bottom and another vent at the top. They just cover over holes that are cut into the drywall. Small pieces of metal drywall J channel provide something for the screws to bite into.
  19. NH_Wood

    NH_Wood Minister of Fire

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    If I go with the setup, I'll give the vents a go as well -sounds good. Can you feel reasonable heat from the vents?
  20. Pagey

    Pagey Minister of Fire

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    Here's my 2 story/living space install. Don't have the chase pics shot and uploaded, but this will give you an idea.

    Stove and the double wall stove pipe up to the support box:
    [​IMG]

    Support box where the stove pipe downstairs transitions to class a upstairs:
    [​IMG]

    Class a coming up from the support box:
    [​IMG]

    Class a rising to ceiling:
    [​IMG]

    Radiation shield to maintain proper clearance in the small attic space pass through:
    [​IMG]

    Don't have roof pics, but there's 4.5' of exposed class a, storm collar, flashing, and roof bracing up there. And, again, don't have enclosed chase pics shot and upped, but you get the idear. :p
  21. NH_Wood

    NH_Wood Minister of Fire

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    Pagey - thank you for the pics - exactly what I might need to do and this is a huge help. Does the ceiling box tie into the first floor ceiling joists for support? I'm fairly handy and hope to do all but the roof part myself (I want to make sure the roof is done exactly right! Again - thanks - the folks on this site are incredibly helpful!
  22. Pagey

    Pagey Minister of Fire

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    Yes, the support kit (mine is the cathedral ceiling kit rather than the round kit) gets framed in to the joists. Here is a Flash video showing the installation of Selkirk's Supervent line of Class A. There's a video about halfway through that you can click to see the framing portion of the install.

    http://www.selkirkcorp.com/Flash-Installation-Guide/english/supervent/supervent.swf
  23. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    Looks like a firestop is not showing at the attic penetration. Did one get installed?
  24. NH_Wood

    NH_Wood Minister of Fire

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    Thanks for the link - will check as soon as I get to a non dial-up spot! Cheers!
  25. joetal17

    joetal17 Member

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    Thanks for the help, pics look exactly what I'm looking to do.
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