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safety check - pic of new install attached

Post in 'The Hearth Room - Wood Stoves and Fireplaces' started by dentman4411, Jan 4, 2013.

?

good to go or need more safety built in

  1. good to go

    33.3%
  2. needs more clearance

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  3. needs more pipe

    66.7%
Multiple votes are allowed.
  1. dentman4411

    dentman4411 New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 19, 2012
    Messages:
    59
    Loc:
    Pittsburgh, PA
    ethan thanks for the reply... stove has been operational for about 2 weeks. i ran a few VERY small fires in it when i got it installed around december 18. waited until the bottom heat shield arrived Christmas eve before i made any kind of hot fire. as far as amount of fuel run through it, i would say about 5 to 6 wheelbarrow' full so hardly any at all really. How do i keep my flue temps up, operate the stove in t he standard NON cat configuration?

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  2. ethanhudson

    ethanhudson Member

    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2012
    Messages:
    113
    Loc:
    South Dakota
    Unfortunately I do not have an answer to the question. Someone more familiar than myself with the operation of cat stoves will have to help. As I mentioned before, I have a non-cat secondary burn stove. But let's say for instance, I start a fire from a cold stove and shut the bypass damper as soon as the fire is established; the flue temp would be about 100-150. If I shut the intake 100% (incrementally of course) as soon as the secondaries became fully active, my flue temp would be minimum 400 degrees with a full load of wood and my stove completely shut down.

    The only guess that I could wager (and it is a guess) would be that you should leave the bypass open longer to establish a better draft before engaging the cat. Hopefully someone with more knowledge about cat stoves, or knowledge of your particular model will chime in.

    BTW, if this is you, BEAUTIFUL work!
  3. dentman4411

    dentman4411 New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 19, 2012
    Messages:
    59
    Loc:
    Pittsburgh, PA
    ok im a stove nOOb..... i was only aware of 2 styles of stove, non cat (straight chimney opening) and CAT (secondary burn using a catalytic element that heats up and ignites exhaust gas) You have a stove that burns secondary smoke without the need for any type of expensive catalytic converter? do tell :D

    and yes thats me thank you for the kind words. i was DEEP into landscape photography for about 5 years but work and the house addition/garage has kept me from any creative opportunity for over 2 years. gotta get back there......
  4. ethanhudson

    ethanhudson Member

    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2012
    Messages:
    113
    Loc:
    South Dakota
    Oh goodness. There is ALOT of information re: cat vs. non cat on this site:

    http://www.hearth.com/talk/threads/more-cat-vs-non-cat-literature.88368/

    http://www.hearth.com/talk/threads/cat-vs-non-cat-pros-and-cons.87312/

    http://www.hearth.com/talk/threads/cat-vs-non-cat-half-time-report.79181/

    Bump for some VC owners to provide some info on how dentman can increase his flue temp.
  5. stoveguy2esw

    stoveguy2esw Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Nov 14, 2006
    Messages:
    5,997
    Loc:
    madison hgts. va
    a cat will fire at between 450F and 500F (internal)in most any case this is assuming it is getting fed a small amount of secondary air dumped just under the cat (this will be incorporated in the stove's design). flue temps just above the stove should reflect this if using a probe, if using a surface temp therm you will only see about 2/3 of the actual stream temp internal to the stove.if your dealer has an actual cat thermometer it would be a useful option to remove doubt.

    as for the installation, i too think you need a bit more stack to my eye it doesn't appear to meet 2-3-10. this would provide additional stack velocity and give more air to the stove (cat stoves like a lot of air). also with that much stack a support is gonna be needed, probably should have it now with potential heavy snowfall.

    thing to remember about creosote. the magic number is 212F as long as flue temps stay above this mark (all the way to the top so at the stove will need to be higher) the water released as steam from the fire (even seasoned wood will produce steam as its consumed) MUST stay a vapor until it leaves the flue. if it does not it condenses on the flue surface and runs back down collecting smoke particles (which are simply wood that didnt burn) as it drips down it warms a few degrees and evaporates back to steam (evaporation is a COOLING function) this will allow it to re-condense and repeat the same sequence this lowers overall stack temps and creates the type of creosote which is the stuff we do not want.

    as for the "indoor" part of the installation, im hooked! its beautiful, flat out LOVE the floor! beautiful house man!
  6. BrowningBAR

    BrowningBAR Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2008
    Messages:
    7,607
    Loc:
    Doylestown, PA
    I think his wood is more of an issue than the flue temps. That's the reason I mentioned burning at a higher temp.

    His Defiant will do a lot of smoking this year due to the fuel. It's manageable, but his chimney will be dirtier, and reloads will be annoying.
  7. dentman4411

    dentman4411 New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 19, 2012
    Messages:
    59
    Loc:
    Pittsburgh, PA
    ok great intel fellas thanks very very much. I got the stove good n hot yesterday afternoon, and threw on some oak and apple I have stored for about 4 years... it was my smoking meat stash:cool: and i packed the defiant pretty full. Stove has never run better! I got a good 7 hours of burn time and several hours of reesidual heat. went to bed at 10 and this morning at 6 am the room with the stove in it was still 60 degrees. not too bad.

    @stoveguy thanks for the compliemtns man i appreciate it. We have been saving for years in order to build the addition and its finally just about complete.

    @browning thanks for all your input man I highly value your POV coming from another defiant user. what temp do you recommend then? ive been using 575-600 as a benchmark but the owners manual says that only medium output and the stove is capable of running up to 750.
  8. Heatsource

    Heatsource Minister of Fire

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    Loc:
    Northern CA
    i thought braces required over 4'
  9. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    Messages:
    49,831
    Loc:
    South Puget Sound, WA
    Pretty sure it's every 5ft. Well at least that is according to the DuraTech, Excel and Selkirk instructions.

    "EXTENDED ROOF BRACKET INSTALLATION
    If the chimney extends more than 5 feet above the roofline, an Extended Roof Bracket must be installed at every 5-foot increment
    of chimney height above the roofline, leaving no more than 5 feet of chimney extending above the last pipe bracket."
    Heatsource likes this.
  10. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    Loc:
    South Puget Sound, WA

    That side is just plain odd dentman. I could do a better looking and fitting piece.

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