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SALT WOOD LOGS BURN!

Post in 'The Hearth Room - Wood Stoves and Fireplaces' started by minesmoria, Mar 11, 2006.

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  1. minesmoria

    minesmoria New Member

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    There is a log sort here on the coast, some of the logs are dumped in the ocean before grading the logs they then move the logs on land.

    I can get lots of free reject logs that have been sitting on land for a a few years, it rains a lot here i would think if there was any salt on them it would get washed away over a 2 year time frame.


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  2. Todd

    Todd Minister of Fire

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    I would guess they are probably ok if the logs have been on land for a couple of years. Is there any white salt like residue on them?
  3. minesmoria

    minesmoria New Member

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    I dont notice any white spots looks like regular wood, the whole logs have not been in the ocean very long a few weeks tops.

    These logs are not the grey colored beachd logs that have been drifting in the ocean for years.

    I dont think the salt gets inside the center of the log.

    The logs are big hemlock massive balsm and some yellow ceder.
  4. webbie

    webbie Seasoned Moderator Staff Member

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    I would suspect that these are OK, whereas usual driftwood is not - the high salt content will corrode a steel stove over time....but whole logs in the ocean for a short while and on land awhile afterwards should not have a high salt content.
  5. Shane

    Shane Minister of Fire

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    Too bad there's not a salt meter. Perhaps you could lick a log or two to determine the salt content. :)
  6. Corey

    Corey Minister of Fire

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    Actually, there is somewhat...

    http://www.lamotte.com/pages/pool/insta.html

    Salt test strips could be as close as your local pool and spa store. You could probably soak some bark or small splinters/sawdust in water, then take a reading. But then that brings up the question of "what is an OK salt level" and what is "too high". I would have to vote with everyone else that if it has only been in the water for a few weeks, probably nothing to worry about.

    Corey

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  7. Sundeep Arole

    Sundeep Arole New Member

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    I'd just take a small sample log from that wood and burn it. If it has any measurable amount of salt, you will get a characteristic bright yellow-orange flame of sodium.

    A lot of my logs generate a bright green flame when burned - I can only suspect they have a high copper content. How, I don't know.
  8. minesmoria

    minesmoria New Member

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    The salt strips are on there way i will soak some bark and wood in water and sees what it says.

    If you lick the wood it does not taste like salt, the odd time i get a bright yellow flame but not blue why?

    I would say its just the out side of the log that gets the salt then most of it gets washed away over time on land.
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