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sawbuck for dummies

Post in 'The Gear' started by Csmith, Dec 5, 2006.

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  1. Csmith

    Csmith New Member

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    I bought the stuff to build a sawbuck then came up with a concern.

    I have got 4 4 foot 2x4s and 4 16in 2x4s.
    I am planning on taking the 4 foot boards and making two Xs and then connecting them with the smaller pieces, so I will end up with two standing Xs 14-16 inches apart.

    how big of a round/split diameter can this config handle, most of the stuff I have to cut is 22-24 inches long and probably a foot or less in diameter

    thanks

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  2. DiscoInferno

    DiscoInferno Minister of Fire

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    I think you should use the "Calvin and Hobbes" method: place progressively larger rounds onto the sawbuck until it collapses. Then rebuild, and you'll know that the second-to-last log was the limit. :coolgrin:
  3. ourhouse

    ourhouse Minister of Fire

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    There you go.
  4. ecfinn

    ecfinn New Member

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    I built something similar out of scrap 2x4's I had sitting around. I wish I would've made the opening of the Xs a bit lower to the ground and a bit larger. I would guess that the top of each X is maybe 12" apart, and I'd rather have it 14". My two Xs are about 15" apart from outside to outside. That way I can easily put the piece to be cut lined up with one side of the X, and cut about 1" on the outside of the other X to get a nice 16" piece. I would size it roughly based upon the length splits you need to put in your stove.

    Once last piece of advice to get it to sit level. After you've built the Xs, stand them up vertically on a level surface, like they will be assembled. Take a 2x4 scrap and lay it on the 1.5" edge up against the X. Mark a line across the bottom of each leg of the X and then cut off that line. That will give you a level "foot" at the bottom of each leg and help the sawbuck sit still better when cutting on it.

    What I've built will easily handle pieces that are 3' long and at least 12" in diameter from a weight perspective. The concern as I mentioned above is the opening at the top of each X.

    I can take pics of mine tonight when I get home if you'd like.

    Eric
  5. Csmith

    Csmith New Member

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    Thanks Eric, pics would be great
  6. ecfinn

    ecfinn New Member

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    Trying to post pics again...

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  7. ecfinn

    ecfinn New Member

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    another angle (Posting seems to be a problem right now...)

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  8. Csmith

    Csmith New Member

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    Thanks, thats exactly what I was aiming for
  9. Andre B.

    Andre B. New Member

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    Here is a design I have worked up recently. An important feature of a sawbuck, at least to me, is that the wood does not fall to the ground when cut, I do not like to bend over.
    When practical I have been cutting 54" poles in the woods rather then finished blocks, you can get a lot more wood to the shed in a given time. The 54" length is perfect because they can be cut into 4 pieces of 13.5" for north south loading or 3 of 18" for east west loading, while being easy to handle up to about 6" diameters.
    http://i73.photobucket.com/albums/i208/andre_b/House Stuff/Sawbuck.jpg
    ______________
    Andre' B.
  10. colsmith

    colsmith New Member

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    We have a sawbuck with 6 feet, i.e., 6 2x4s, not just 4. We had it with just the 4 for some time, it was okay but for short pieces I always had to hold on while hubby cut or they were falling down. He just added the third leg in the middle, close to one end, and it is SO much better now. He can cut things that are a lttle too long, and also have really long pieces held up by it. The whole thing is about 4 feet long, the extra set of legs is near one end. We can cut between the legs and feel safer because something is between us and the chainsaw, and the wood falls down a lot less, even after cutting. We can accomodate almost any size log it is strong enough to hold since the legs go up some distance on the top side. We used all scrap lumber so that is why they are different colors . . .

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  11. Gooserider

    Gooserider Mod Emeritus

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    When I was building my sawbuck I used a 4x4 (scrap) for the base rail and just screwed two scrap 2x4's to the top two sides on each end... I also screwed a couple of hunks of scrap 1x? across the bottom ends of the 2x4's to act as stringers. It's about 26" between the inside uprights, (my max length to go into the smoke dragons) if the peice is to short to rest on both X's it doesn't need cutting. If it does, I either balance the pole and cut alternating rounds off each end, or space it with an even amount hanging off each end and slice down the middle... I've got a big notch in the center of the cross member from when I've gone through a bit far with the saw, but a 4x4 has plenty of meat to spare, so I'm not worried about it.

    (I've also gotten into cutting most poles on the ground, so I use the sawbuck a lot less...)

    Gooserider
  12. WarmGuy

    WarmGuy Feeling the Heat

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    I like Andre's idea of being able to put a log in, then make 3-4 cuts without moving the log. Have you actually made one of these, Andre?
  13. carpniels

    carpniels Minister of Fire

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    Hi guys,

    I like the idea of a saw horse too, but how the heck do you haul your logs up that high? If I am strong enough to do that, I might as well use a hand saw?

    Or are these only for itty bitty branches up to 4 inch?

    Thanks

    carpniels

    PS. most of mine are 10 -20 inches so there is no way I can lift those in any length on a saw horse (even if it is strong enough). I cut with the log on the timberjack to keep the chain off the ground.
  14. Gooserider

    Gooserider Mod Emeritus

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    The sawbuck is mostly for small stuff, or things that aren't way long... I'd say up to about 6" diameter depending on the length, etc. I consider it a somewhat optional item as much of what I do is done on the ground or with the sawbuck. If I drop a tree in one peice, I usually try to cut the branches off at the "useable diameter" point and then cut them to length as I work my way back to the trunk, in which case the branches are mostly off the ground and nicely held in place for me by the tree they are part of; and I don't need the sawbuck. If OTOH, the branches get taken off before the tree is dropped, they get awkward to cut up without something to hold them in place, so I use the sawbuck for those.

    Once I get to "log size" stuff, then I either do the partial cut and roll method, or use the timberjack (or both) I've found the partial cut and roll method seems to get me more rounds with less effort, but YMMV.

    Gooserider
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