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Sealing Stove Pipe?

Post in 'The Hearth Room - Wood Stoves and Fireplaces' started by boatboy63, Jan 21, 2011.

  1. boatboy63

    boatboy63 Member

    Joined:
    Feb 6, 2010
    Messages:
    187
    Loc:
    Northeastern TN
    Parkboy,
    Can't do it now since it has all been siliconed. Before the stove cement/mortar was first put in the seams/joints, I did do a similar smoke test with a cigarette. I did see evidence of it pulling smoke, but since the stove was hot, it was hard to continue. When the stove is hot, it and the pipe puts out enough heat that it will actually "draw" the smoke up beside the pipe at a good rate of speed. This is because hot air rises.

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  2. PARKBOY

    PARKBOY New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2010
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    75
    Loc:
    CENTRAL KY
    What kind of silicone did you use to seal it up and how is it holding up to the heat?
  3. boatboy63

    boatboy63 Member

    Joined:
    Feb 6, 2010
    Messages:
    187
    Loc:
    Northeastern TN
    Permatex Ultra Copper. For the most part, it is holding good. Does seem that on the lowest part of the pipe where it connects to the stove flange, seems to be wanting to pull off in 1 spot. None of what was put on the flange was actually pushed into the cracks. It was just squeezed from the tube and not tooled in. All the other joints were tooled in by finger and is in good shape. Has been in the 50's for the last couple days, but is supposed to start getting colder tomorrow. This should give us a chance to heat it up a little more and see how it goes.
  4. bigbluebus

    bigbluebus New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 8, 2011
    Messages:
    44
    Loc:
    Northern IL
    I understand exactly your line of thinking. I had the same concerns, I have about 14 ft of stove pipe inside the house from stove to ceiling, all in 2-ft sections and all with seams running lengthwise.

    When I first put this setup together, I sealed the joints with stove pipe the best I could but most of it has crumbled and fallen out; but when the new stove replaces the current Chinese POC Vogelzang, I'm going to use a solid steel pipe (no seams) instead, if I can find a supplier by the time the new stove arrives. I figured a solid pipe will also be much safer in case of horizontal movement. I've also heard that in a case of a flue fire, the seams in the stove pipe will actually blow out and come apart (definitely don't ever want that to happen to us). I don't know if this is true, but I'd rather err on the safe side.
  5. mhrischuk

    mhrischuk Guest

    Light a match and blow it out next to the gap. See if it draws in the smoke. You can use a cigarette if you smoke.
  6. Backwoods Savage

    Backwoods Savage Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Feb 14, 2007
    Messages:
    27,816
    Loc:
    Michigan
    I have always used furnace cement in the joints of the stovepipe. Yes, you can get by without doing it but I still feel it is good and the stuff really is cheap so we are not talking about a big deal here.
  7. RustyShackleford

    RustyShackleford Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2009
    Messages:
    624
    Loc:
    NC
    So you find that Elmer's pipe actually fits together ? Here was my experience:

    http://www.hearth.com/econtent/index.php/forums/viewthread/67805/

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