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Selkirk stove pipe install...

Post in 'The Hearth Room - Wood Stoves and Fireplaces' started by aansorge, Aug 31, 2013.

  1. aansorge

    aansorge Minister of Fire

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    So I have hooked up my Selkirk double wall stove pipe and it is in place but I question the safety of the setup. Basically you hook the pipes up and use three screws to attach all the sections together . I have to elbows in the setup too.

    The screws seem to be barely holding on. They don't screw the sections of stove pipe together, they just use friction.

    Also the arrows on the pipe point to have the male ends up....the opposite of everything I've read on here...

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  2. PapaDave

    PapaDave Minister of Fire

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    Turn the pipe over, the arrow will be pointing down.
    Never installed dbl wall, but those screws should be going through both sections of pipe. Maybe you need to pre-drill.
    Go to Selkirk site and ...n/m...http://www.selkirkcorp.com/Selkirk/Product.aspx?id=58# HTH
  3. STOVEGUY11

    STOVEGUY11 Feeling the Heat

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    Usually there are arrows on the inside of the pipe showing which direction is up. Also the screws are shorties so you dont penetrate the inner layer. Maybe post some pictures if you could.
  4. aansorge

    aansorge Minister of Fire

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    The arrows are on stickers on the outside.

    Yes the screws are shorties and they don't always seem to bite.
  5. aansorge

    aansorge Minister of Fire

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    Here is a picture of a typical screw...

    Attached Files:

  6. PapaDave

    PapaDave Minister of Fire

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    Dude, wait until your wife sees that pic.!!!
    Does dbl wall have the inside pipe crimped opposite the outer pipe?
    Highbeam likes this.
  7. aansorge

    aansorge Minister of Fire

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    I don't know what that means?
  8. aansorge

    aansorge Minister of Fire

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    The stickers point and say "up".
  9. webby3650

    webby3650 Master of Fire

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    On double wall pipe the inner liner has the male end pointed down and outer jacket has the male end pointed up. Those screws should go through both outer jackets. It sounds like its just going through the outer one and just pushing the inner pipe in. That's no good, predrill it.
    jeff_t and PapaDave like this.
  10. webby3650

    webby3650 Master of Fire

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    That's what I don't like about Selkirk double wall,a lot of the crimps are visible, and it has ribs all over it. It's also hard to use compared to all the other brands I've used, the slips are the worst.
  11. aansorge

    aansorge Minister of Fire

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    Slips? Do you mean, like, the slipping that occurs between the pieces?

    So you say I should drill holes so the screws can dig into the other pipe?
  12. PapaDave

    PapaDave Minister of Fire

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    Let me ask then webby, are other stove pipes compatible with selkirk?
    The pics I've found don't show much detail.
    I'll have to check with the ONE somewhat local dealer to see what they have.
    I got my single wall Heatfab from him.
    Sorry for the jack aansorge, but this may help both of us.
  13. SteveKG

    SteveKG Minister of Fire

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    You don't put screws all the way through to the inner pipe. There are two layers of pipe, one inside the other. The outer layer is the black pipe one sees and holds on to. The inner layer is stainless. The outer layer has the crimped end [the "male" end] on the upper end. The inner, stainless pipe has the crimped end down, toward the stove. You do not need to have the screws go all the way into the inner pipe to have a stable, safe installation. Pre-drill the holes, too. But don't drill all the way through both pipe layers, only the outer one.

    I assume that "slips" is referring to the adjustable sections one can buy, and they slide in and out to shorten or lengthen the pipe. Great stuff when trying to get the pipe installed to the exact length you want. With the adjustable sections, you do not have to cut a length of pipe to make it fit. Also, when it comes time to clean out the pipe, you can simply remove the adjustable section. Typically, one only need one adjustable piece. They are pricey, but worth it. I can imagine situations where one might need two sections [such as a horizontal section and a vertical section of stove pipe.] If the poster was not referring to adjustable sections, then I don't know what slips means.

    Hope this makes it clearer.
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  14. webby3650

    webby3650 Master of Fire

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    No other pipe is compatible with Selkirk, that I'm aware of. No double wall pipe that I have messed with is compatible with other brands.

    And yes, the slip i was referring to is the adjustable section of pipe. An adjustable section is a must for any stove! There is no reason to fight it with slip sections available.
    PapaDave likes this.
  15. SteveKG

    SteveKG Minister of Fire

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    Yes, I meant to comment on the compatibility among brands of pipe. I only have Selkirk [used to be MetalBestos]. Couple years ago, I added another stove to our home and did a lot of calling around and everyone who sold pipe told me that no two brands of stovepipe can be mixed. I cannot verify that from trying to do it, this is just what I was told by everyone. I also have seen it stated thus on this forum a number of times. So, good bet you cannot mix.
  16. Highbeam

    Highbeam Minister of Fire

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    This is fabulous. Picture of your wife calling her a typical screw.

    You could have talked about the "loose screw" in that photo too.

    Of course I know what you meant. That screw should suck in so that the head is against the outer wall. I'll add selkirk to my list of brands to avoid.

    For you installers, is there a trouble free brand?
    BrotherBart likes this.
  17. webby3650

    webby3650 Master of Fire

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    Yes, dura-vent is the stuff to have! :cool: It's very easy to use, rarely, if ever had an issue with it.
    alforit likes this.
  18. aansorge

    aansorge Minister of Fire

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    Funny stuff!!!

    I can't get the screw all the way in (no jokes)...it only goes in until it hits the outside of the other pipe. Some people are saying I need to predrill some holes. What does this mean? Does this mean drill a small pilot hole that the screw can do into? Do I drill all the way through? If not, how do you know when to stop?

    Furnace cement at the joints?
  19. PapaDave

    PapaDave Minister of Fire

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    Yep, predrill into the outer layer only. Take the joint apart to see if the inner pipe is being pushed in by the screw. Are those self tapping screws? If not, get some, or predrill.
    Lots here say no need to use any high temp caulk or anything on the joints, but I do.
    Doesn't look great, but if those joints aren't airtight, they will draw cool air and might cause a bit of a problem.
    I'd try a fire or 2 w/o first, as it's difficult if not impossible to get a clean bead.
    Use an incense stick or lighter to find leaks by putting it near the joint. If you have a leak, the flame or smoke will be drawn into the joint.
  20. webby3650

    webby3650 Master of Fire

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    It's not necessary to seal the pipe joints. If you choose to, only seal the inner liner connection, not the outer jacket. For starters it would be pointless and it will be fugly. You want the screws to attach the two outer jackets together, you do not want it to penetrate the inner liner.
  21. Highbeam

    Highbeam Minister of Fire

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    Really small bit, really shallow. You only need to pierce that outer shell to make your pilot hole.
  22. Treemoss

    Treemoss Member

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    Can he have a creosote dripping problem because the crimped part was facing up not facing down. So it could drip out onto the stove.
  23. webby3650

    webby3650 Master of Fire

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    No, the inner pipe is male end down like it should be, only the outer jacket is reversed. Other wise it would be even worse to get together.
  24. SteveKG

    SteveKG Minister of Fire

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    Sometimes the screws do not go all the way into the outer layer of pipe, so the head of the screw will stick out some. Don't worry about it.

    Cementing the joints is a matter of personal opinion. I don't do it, but some people do.
  25. aansorge

    aansorge Minister of Fire

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    Thanks for all the advise. I called Selkirk and the technician advised what you guys said: drill a small hole through the outer pipe and screw in the screw. Worked great. The Selkirk directions say nothing about drilling except on the connection to the chimney box junction. This is a mistake. All screw holes need to be drilled. The top pipe has 3 holes already, you just need to drill through the first layer of pipe in the bottom pipe once they are connected. It really isn't all that bad.

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