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Sell me on the pros and cons of steel vs masonry chimney

Post in 'The Hearth Room - Wood Stoves and Fireplaces' started by blucoondawg, Mar 24, 2013.

  1. Highbeam

    Highbeam Minister of Fire

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    How about a window well?

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  2. dougand3

    dougand3 Minister of Fire

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    That is the best. No elbows - maybe 15* offsets in black pipe before you penetrate the ceiling/1st floor. Class A offsets or 15* or 30* can be EXPENSIVE. Burying Class A would make a creosote factory and probably against mfg specs/codes. Class A has a 2" CTC - so inside chase can be 1 sq ft footprint. May just be a bump out in a corner.
  3. Backwoods Savage

    Backwoods Savage Minister of Fire

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    Oh ya, having the stove in the basement can cause a problem there, but it can be overcome.
  4. blucoondawg

    blucoondawg New Member

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    The window well would be a good idea, I didn't think of that, my grandparents had a steel chimney out there when they first moved the furnace to the basement, they had problems with it, I cannot remember anymore what the deal was but it may have been buried and that caused a problem like was mentioned above. That window well may be the way I will go, thanks for the idea.
  5. Joful

    Joful Minister of Fire

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    If you go that route, do consider how you'll drain the window well in heavy rain / snow. Some crushed stone in the bottom of the well, burying a perf pipe which drains to lower ground, is one of many ways to solve the problem.
  6. blucoondawg

    blucoondawg New Member

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    I currently have 2 window wells on basement windows and don't have any problems with drainage. Snow doesn't seem to accumulate much in them and they are under the gable end overhang so rain isn't terrible either. I also have a wood door in the wall that I have a steel cover over and it only is a problem if the gutters clog.
  7. DMbekus

    DMbekus New Member

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    I would not disagree with the benefits of the steel. But in some instances the aesthetics of steel or vinyl chases is just disagreeable. A well-built masonry chimney will last a very long time. They should not be used (or should be lined with ss) when 90+ appliances re vented thru them. Though most current 90+ are direct vent and do not need any chimney. I don’t know the ins and outs of chimney fires, but I sleep well at night with a lot (well built) masonry between a chimney fire and my house.
  8. blucoondawg

    blucoondawg New Member

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    This is the reason why I like masonry as well. Most of the problem with mine is it wasn't done properly which caused problems from the start. And I do prefer the look of the masonry over steel but steel is definitely easier and faster to put up. I only use mine for the wood furnace so the other appliances isn't a concern for me. Maybe I will do a masonry with a steel flue, have the best of both worlds?
  9. DMbekus

    DMbekus New Member

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    Don't often see new work done that way, but why not? Other then higher cost of ss vs. clay
  10. rideau

    rideau Minister of Fire

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    Masonry is spending a lot for a look. I'd put steel inside, straight up. Really won't impact appearance of home from outside, then, will give best draft (likely not a problem if installed in basement, as presumably thus a long flue), is extremely easy to clean, essentially no maintenance, available with lifetime warranty (as above, plus ICC Ultrablack/Excel), pipe can be painted to match stove and very attractive, masonry wall can be built around pipe in stove room is you prefer traditional look, can also be built around exiting pipe if you prefer traditional look; ICC is warranteed for two 30 minute chimney fires, which should let you sleep peacefully at night. And, if you ever want to remodel or change stove locations, heck of a lot easier to move steel pipe than a masonry chimney: and you can even reuse the pipe in your new location.

    Hands down, the best steel pipe manufactured is the way I'd go - the way I went.
    Seasoned Oak likes this.
  11. Seasoned Oak

    Seasoned Oak Minister of Fire

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    Only problem with steel is its looks like crapola goin up the side of your house. Looks good inside but outside? Not so good.
    Joful likes this.
  12. Fins59

    Fins59 Member

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    Coondawg - As far as longevity, I installed my Metalbestos SS chimney in 1979, and it is still going strong, and I burn 24/7.
    As far as placement, I have my chimney going up through a bathroom closet, that way the stove is in center of house. That's another advantage of steel, you can put them just about anywhere, no footings necessary.

    I purchased mine from Wausau Homes when they had an outlet store. $5 for a 30" section. At the time I worked about 1/2 mile from that store and would go there every day and bought 1 or 2 sections at a time as they became available. I got enough sections for my house and garage. A few little dings in them but nothing serious. Mine has a 7" diameter and works fine.
    They are easy to clean too. Cleaned mine the other day, took 15 minutes.
  13. Seasoned Oak

    Seasoned Oak Minister of Fire

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    IT dont really take that long to put up a masonry chimney. ANd they will last the life of the structure if done right. Iv seen one go up in less than 2 days.If mine were outside, i would definitely put up masonry,all inside perhaps SS.
  14. Joful

    Joful Minister of Fire

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    Not to pick nits, but our friends in Europe have shown us the life of a structure can be 1000+ years. The three oldest chimneys in my house all required rebuilding or re-lining within the first 240 years.

    Then again... I don't see many structures built today, which I expect will be standing in the year 3013.

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