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Shed or no shed

Post in 'The Wood Shed' started by Burnbaby, Feb 8, 2012.

  1. bogydave

    bogydave Minister of Fire

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    As you've noticed not perfect answers.
    "Best" is season the wood outside in single rows, in the sun & wind.
    After a year or 2 then you can move it to a shed.
    I stack it, 2 spaced rows, on pallets in the open for a summer then to the shed.
    My shed is more a roof over the wood, open on all sides for air circulation, with some space between the rows.
    It seasons in the shed, just not as fast. It's to be used 2 years after in the shed.
    Works for me, we each have to develop a system that works best for our conditions.
    "Best & what we can do", sometimes don't match up. :zip:
    If you figure out a way to handle it once & be good seasoned, dry , ready to burn well, where I can grab & load it into the stove, I'm open to make changes.
    I figure I handle the wood at least 14 times, from the tree in the woods to the ashes :)
    1: fell the tree & buck into 16â€/18†etc rounds (may be more depending on location, system used)
    2:load in trailer
    3:eek:ff load trailer at home
    4: split * (May count for 2 or more, now 2 or more pieces (see:#5))
    5:big rounds split again (sometimes this can expand to several)
    6: throw to a pile
    7: stack in rows on pallets to season
    8: load on trailer & move to the wood shed
    9: off load trailer into the shed
    10: load in wheel barrow/trailer
    11: stack in wood box in the house
    12 load in stove
    13 shovel their ashes into a bucket
    14 carry bucket out & dump (allot lighter now :) )

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  2. Pat53

    Pat53 Minister of Fire

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    UP Mich
    I usually leave it outside for a few months then move it in.
  3. muncybob

    muncybob Minister of Fire

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    My first year with a shed....luvin' it! If it ever snows/ices up here I'll be luvin' it more. No more tarps, wood is always dry and easily accessible. Mrs likes the fact that it's all in one place and not an eye sore(how can stacks of wood be an eye sore? I don't get it!). I think she'll like the shed more once I get a stain on it this summer and maybe a few hanging plants. She wasted no time in transplanting some roses next to the shed last autumn. Keeping my eyes open at yard sales and such for old rusty wood cutting tools that I can hang on the sides. Built mine large enough to store some tractor implements in there and free up some space in the garage so the splitter is out of the weather. A shed is certainly not a requirement but it seems to have made a lot of sense for us.
  4. firefighterjake

    firefighterjake Minister of Fire

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    I love my woodshed . . . but don't think it's mandatory and don't think it's a good idea if someone thinks they will just load up the shed with unseasoned wood in the spring and by fall the wood will be fantastic for burning.

    I think the best part of having a woodshed is the ability to store a fair amount of wood and not have to worry about snow, ice, rain and dealing with tarps. I can go out to the woodshed and spend some time picking out what wood I need or want to use depending on the weather -- i.e. if I'm home for the day I may opt to go with some punks, chunks and uglies or lower BTU wood . . . if I'm going to be away for a while I may opt to use some better BTU wood and larger sized wood.

    I know some folks where I live that put unseasoned wood directly into their woodshed, but I would not . . . even the best vented woodshed is usually no substitute for being fully exposed to the sun and wind . . . even well vented woodsheds with no sides typically will not allow the wood in the center of the stacks to get much wind.
  5. Lumber-Jack

    Lumber-Jack Minister of Fire

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    How about a long skinny woodshed that only holds two rows of splits?
    The concept of a long skinny shed makes sense not only for seasoning wood, but from a less wood handling aspect too.
    If you stack your wood outside to season and then move it into the shed after it's seasoned, that is one more step you have to go through that you could avoid by stacking it directly into a covered woodshed.
    It really doesn't take that much more material to build a long skinny woodshed than it does to build a square one of the same area. Certainly the roofing material is exactly the same, although you'll likely need a few more posts and beams.
    The advantage of course is that if you build the shed only wide enough to hold a couple of rows of splits they will have plenty of exposure to the air, and there won't be any wood that gets trapped in the middle and doesn't get that exposure.

    I built my shed long and skinny simply to utilize the skinny space between my driveway and my neighbor's yard, but I have stacked wood in there that wasn't seasoned and it was easy to leave it for a couple years and work around it, nothing got trapped behind it.
    [​IMG]
  6. JustWood

    JustWood Minister of Fire

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    IMO a shed is probably less of a priority in regions that see little to no snow. I know since I built mine I have not regretted it one bit. It's pretty common to have 2-5 feet of snow on the ground 3-4 months here and without a shed is a PITA.
    Carbon, that shed is sweet.
  7. GAMMA RAY

    GAMMA RAY Minister of Fire

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    I love that shed! I showed the pic of it to Mr Gamma the first time I saw it here ....and I asked him to build one like that.
    Pfft....
    he said he had all the building materials to do it.....
    Still no freakin shed. >:-(

    Nice work Carbon.
  8. firefighterjake

    firefighterjake Minister of Fire

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    Hehheh . . . as I was writing I was thinking to myself, "You know my advice would probably not be valid if someone was to build a woodshed with only a row or two of wood that was pretty much open to the wind" but then I thought, "Nah, who would build a woodshed like that?" I completely spaced on your woodshed design.
  9. smokinj

    smokinj Minister of Fire

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    Anderson, Indiana
    No shed here but I have a rake in the heated shop that holds a cord.

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  10. RORY12553

    RORY12553 Minister of Fire

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    That shed is really nice! I have a 16 ft shed on one side of the property and another square one in the back of the property. Both are open on all sides. To me it's the same concept as stacking a pallet with a tarp or roofing material on the top. Anyone disagree?
  11. JustWood

    JustWood Minister of Fire

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    Similar concept but I don't have to shovel 3' of snow off of my shed roof to get to the wood . tarps and rubber eventually rip leaving a mini glacier under the tarp I always seemed to fight with. Since I built my shed I never go back to rubber roofing. I do have a few cord under rubber but as soon as there is 1' of snow on the ground I start pulling out of the shed just because its easier.
  12. daveswoodhauler

    daveswoodhauler Minister of Fire

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    Carbon, If this is the shed I remember...post a link to your video regarding the "trap door".....this is one of the most intriguing sheds I have ever seen.
  13. mitchinpa

    mitchinpa Member

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    Loc:
    Western PA
    The wood does season in a wood shed, but like others said, just not as quick. It also depends GREATLY on the type of wood of how long it needs to season. I buck all my wood in March and April, split in early May, then in lays on my concrete driveway in an uncovered pile until September, when I stack it in the shed. I use mostly cherry and sassafras. When I put it in the shed, it will be in the 15-19% moisture range. I check a few pieces during the burning season, and they are usually in the 12-16% range. So it will season. I wouldnt suggest splitting the wood and stacking the same day in the shed though, as it will just take too long to get the moisture out.
  14. Ken45

    Ken45 Minister of Fire

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    southern Ohio
    I think Dave is right except his 14 steps of handling firewood is more than I want to do!

    I believe in keep the wood covered. Our "shed" is a carport, open on all four sides, on hilltop with a good breeze. Most of what is in there is in portable racks of a half cord each. The wood goes from the splitter to the racks, the racks go into the shed until we are ready to use them when the entire rack is moved into the garage. It helps a lot to have a tractor or skid steer with forks :)

    I suspect that stacking uncovered is okay in single rows but anything more than that will get rain and snow down between the rows that won't dry very well.

    I do not see where leaving a stack uncovered improves the seasoning. Yes, the sun gets on it (when the sun does shine) but that only helps the top layer, not all the splits under the top layer where the water has trickled down. We have had rain just about every third day last year. I really can't believe that letting the stacks get wet is better than keeping the rain off of them.

    I have a skid of cut rounds that have been sitting out in the weather for three years and they have gotten rotten.

    When the shed is full (I need another cord yet), I'll probably start leaving the racks sit outside but I will put some scrap barn metal over the tops to keep the rain off.

    Ken
  15. bogydave

    bogydave Minister of Fire

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    CL:
    Still the "gold standard" of wood sheds. :)

    K45, I looked a several & made it to work for me, could be better. Less handling would be ice,
    Maybe I'll find someone who want to dump a few 30 yard dump truck loads of free wood & save 40% of my handling. I can dream :)

    Lots of options,
    Keeping the snow & rain off is real nice & more user friendly.
  16. bpirger

    bpirger Minister of Fire

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    Ithaca NY Area
    I essentially used 9 4x4's 8' on center to build a 16'x16' shed. Center 4x4's were taller to carry a ridge beam. No sides...just some 2x6's for bracing. This is key, so it is very open to wind and air flow. 2x6x12' used for the roof...nice overhang. It's a woodshed, so not worried about the span. 2x4's across the top of the rafters...then metal roofing applied. metal roofing is the most expensive part....but should last forever.

    Key is to make the center ridge up high enough so the "facia" board is high enough. No banging on the head, can drive the tractor bucket underneath for access, etc.

    Once you get wood from under a tarp in the winter, with 3' of snow, you'll realize you NEED to have a shed, or a place to bring in a years supply of wood.

    When you build it, think about the primary wind direction. When you stack, think about your primary wind direction. Leave spaces. My rows are east-west (wind from the west dominately) and in theory, I can stand on one side of the shed and see through the stacks clear out the other. Doesn't always happen that way.

    I winch in to the shed, block and split, then stack it there. Next time it moves is next to the Garn. Third time it moves is into the Garn.

    Ideally, have enough shed for say 3 years supply and get it full. Then you cut one year at a time, but years ahead, and rotate where you take the dry wood from. At that point, you don't have to worry about it drying in the shed. In two years, it will be fine....shed or not. Oak always takes longer....shed or not.

    My experiences only....
  17. Lumber-Jack

    Lumber-Jack Minister of Fire

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    Thanks for the compliments on the woodshed everyone. %-P
    Sure beats the old tarps.
    Here ya go Dave. :)
  18. Beardog

    Beardog Member

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    That is awesome!
  19. bpirger

    bpirger Minister of Fire

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    Is that your own toxic material storage idea? BC? Doesn't seem like tornado country....
  20. ansehnlich1

    ansehnlich1 Minister of Fire

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    I don't have a wood shed, and don't want one.

    I have over 12 cord stacked right now, likely closer to 15 cord.

    Why would I want to move 5 cord to a shed? That's another step in the handling process and I ain't doin' it.
  21. Lumber-Jack

    Lumber-Jack Minister of Fire

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    No tornados, but we do get some pretty big dust devils. ;-)
    And nothing toxic down there, just some stuff I don't want to freeze. I didn't build it either, I found it when I was building my woodshed, I just cleaned it up inside so I could use it. It was an old underground water cistern for a school dating back to early 1900s.
  22. RORY12553

    RORY12553 Minister of Fire

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    That is awesome! Shed looks fantastic too!
  23. bogydave

    bogydave Minister of Fire

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    High schoolers had to hide back then when dating?? :)
    Dating & prohibition maybe too.
    Party room ;)
  24. GAMMA RAY

    GAMMA RAY Minister of Fire

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    That video is the best...as well as the choice of music.
    clever as hell to utilize that space Carbon.
    You always have cool vids... :)
  25. seeyal8r

    seeyal8r Feeling the Heat

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    North Central Oklahoma
    I have a shed but I just keep tools, mowers, etc in it. I'm not much on moving wood over and over. I keep a rick (1/3 cord) under the eve of my house all winter and enough in the house for a week. I usually tarp whatever is next outside. This method has saved me from building a shed and having to move all of my wood one extra time. The tarp keeps it dry enough. If it rained everyday here all winter my method wouldn't work but for the most part any precip is in the form of snow and it usually dries before it melts so my stacks stay pretty dry in the winter. Tarps come in all different colors including brown and black which don't look as bad as the blue ones I have.

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