1. Welcome Hearth.com Guests and Visitors - Please enjoy our forums!
    Hearth.com GOLD Sponsors who help bring the site content to you:
    Hearthstone Soapstone and Cast-Iron stoves( Wood, Gas or Pellet Stoves and Inserts)

Sheetrocked Chimney and Vogelzang stove

Post in 'The Hearth Room - Wood Stoves and Fireplaces' started by FrogLady, Feb 4, 2013.

  1. FrogLady

    FrogLady New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 4, 2013
    Messages:
    2
    My husband and I bought an 80-year old house and would like to install wood heat. The previous chimney was sheetrocked and a staircase (aka, flammable wooden boards) built up against it. We also have a Vogelzang Boxwood cast iron stove, which claims it should be able to heat the bottom floor of our 1 & 1/2 story house.

    This will be entirely DIY project, because of our budget. We are not sure what is the safest and most affordable way to go about installing a chimney. We thought of three options:

    Our favorite: Use the existing chimney. A sweep told us it might still be okay, even with the flammable materials against the brick, if we use extra insulation. But I don't know how much insulation would be needed.

    Back-up option: Use a metal chimney kit, but it would have to go through both stories, and location of the stove below becomes more problematic.

    Last resort idea: We eventually plan to build a room onto the house, in a couple years. If the other options aren't feasible, we could build a chimney into the new room. But, this is a last resort because the location would be de-centralized, and I'm not sure it would keep our plumbing warm. We might have to go out and buy a more powerful stove if we did this.

    Can anyone help, and tell us what we need to do regarding the chimney? Is the sweep right - we can still use the chimney if we extra-insulate - and if so, how much insulation would we need, and what type? Neither my husband nor I are experienced with major carpentry work, and we don't want to burn the house down, so any advice would be appreciated!

    Helpful Sponsor Ads!





  2. Jags

    Jags Moderate Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Aug 2, 2006
    Messages:
    15,246
    Loc:
    Northern IL
    What was the chimney used for to begin with? How large is the existing flue?
  3. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2005
    Messages:
    49,037
    Loc:
    South Puget Sound, WA
    Welcome If the throat of the chimney is large enough to handle an insulated liner you should be ok. The chimney will need to be swept clean first. However, that's not going to improve the safety of the VG box stove though. It's the weak link in the safety chain. Also, all combustibles will need to be at least 36" away from this stove. Is that possible? A picture can be helpful in spotting other issues.
    raybonz likes this.
  4. dougand3

    dougand3 Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Oct 16, 2008
    Messages:
    854
    Loc:
    North Alabama
    The Vogelzang Boxwood has 36" Clearance To Combustibles.....ie, it can't be installed within 3 feet of anything that will burn....that's quite a distance. You may want to consider an EPA stove with tighter clearances.
  5. Woody Stover

    Woody Stover Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Dec 25, 2010
    Messages:
    5,710
    Loc:
    Southern IN
    In addition, you might consider the reason it's called the Boxwood; When you burn it, your wood will last about as long as a cardboard box. :oops:
    raybonz likes this.
  6. FrogLady

    FrogLady New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 4, 2013
    Messages:
    2
    I'm sorry... I don't know the flu size or what it was used for, because the entire thing is walled up in sheetrock. We didn't want to start ripping out sheetrock unnecessarily until we found out if the chimney option was even feasible.

    A little dismayed that the VG doesn't sound very promising...? We do have some space constraints, but I was thinking about shortening the 36" parameter by spacing a metal wall protector 2" away from the livingroom walls. ??
  7. Jags

    Jags Moderate Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Aug 2, 2006
    Messages:
    15,246
    Loc:
    Northern IL
    Honestly, I would stop any friend of mine from installing the boxwood stove. It is the lowest common denominator that can still be called a wood stove. Non-epa compliant, hungry and on the verge of down right dangerous in a home.
    Seriously - I would heavily encourage you to reconsider THAT stove.

    In order to do anything with that flue, you will need it to be clean (sweep). If you have someone do this, they will be able to tell you what it is.
  8. DexterDay

    DexterDay Guest

    The Boxwood has so many flaws and leaks. Cant be controlled and glows red when over half full. My Buddy has one in his Trapping Shed and I am Very afraid!!!

    Unsafe, unsatisfactory performance (2 hr burn at best), and uncontrollable...... IMHO
  9. dougand3

    dougand3 Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Oct 16, 2008
    Messages:
    854
    Loc:
    North Alabama
    I'll be less delicate - THAT BOXWOOD WILL BURN YO CRIB DOWN! I bought one once from HarborFreight...after unpacking and inspecting, I thought...No way am I gonna install this. Seriously - if you want wood heat, get a real stove - Englander, US Stove, Century, Drolet make inexpensive, safe and EPA certified stoves.
  10. jeff_t

    jeff_t Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Sep 14, 2008
    Messages:
    3,686
    Loc:
    SE MI
    I'm pretty sure there is no clearance reduction allowed with this stove.

    I don't think I would want this in my house
    5N15O35Hd3Lf3p73N8c957365cc0d489d1b68.jpg
  11. Huntindog1

    Huntindog1 Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Dec 6, 2011
    Messages:
    1,546
    Loc:
    South Central Indiana
    FRog,

    Where are you located?
  12. jrcurto

    jrcurto Member

    Joined:
    Nov 3, 2009
    Messages:
    85
    Loc:
    Southern Connecticut
    I have the Vogelzang PotBelly stove. Initially I used it in the garage on the concrete slab and through a cement block wall, thimble, DVL, Class A, etc Only ran it when I was working there during the day and never banked it for overnight. It got real hot and just consumed wood and coal obnoxiously. You could leave the garage door open and still wear a tee shirt. Never felt safe with it nor should I have. It was fun at times but now it is a conversation piece and will be placed in the den. I plan to put a pellet stove in the garage someday to see that side of the woodheat game. Seriously, considering the clearances and construction of the Boxwood as well as wood consumption, its just not worth it. My Rangeley has been cruising on a load of hickory for 4 hours now...

    Be safe,
    Jim
  13. Huntindog1

    Huntindog1 Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Dec 6, 2011
    Messages:
    1,546
    Loc:
    South Central Indiana
    If you like those type stoves and you live by a Menards you can get one of these and its EPA and UL Certified.
    Has the Secondary Burn Tubes also and its on sale.
    Ships too store for free.

    http://www.menards.com/main/heating...-boxwood-style-wood-stove/p-200875-c-6884.htm



    [​IMG]

    The Durango meets EPA requirements for CERTIFIED wood burning appliances as well as meeting State of Washington regulations for low emissions at 3.6 grams/hour.
    The high efficiency Durango® wood stove is a no-nonsense, hard working AIR TIGHT woodstove designed specifically to produce a hotter fire for longer periods of time with exceptionally low emissions.
    This high level of performance is made possible by our Turbo Burn® technology which includes a series of cross-drilled re-burn tubes in an airtight firebox. Turbo Burn delivers secondary air to the top of the firebox for more complete combustion resulting in a hotter fire and extending the burn time up to 12 hours!
    EPA Certified, the Durango wood stove is one of the cleanest burning stoves on the market today, making this an exceptional appliance that's ideal for all wood stove installations.
    FEATURES:

    • Burns up to 12 hours
    • The Durango wood stove heats up to 1,500 square feet
    • Accepts logs up to 26" in length
    • BTU rating: 73,790
    • Safety tested to UL Standard 1482-1998
    • Over 75% efficient
      SPECIFICATIONS:
      Height (Overall) ...................... 26"
      Width ....................................... 17.5"
      Depth ....................................... 34"
      Firebox Depth ......................... 27"
      Firebox Width ......................... 13.5"
      Firebox Volume ....................... 2.2 cubic ft
      Flue Size (Round) .................. 6"
      Door Opening ......................... 12" x 9"
      Fuel .......................................... Wood
      BTU Rating (cord wood) ....... 73,790
      (EPA constant - 36,089 BTUs)
      Emissions ................................ 3.6 grams/hour
      Weight ..................................... 294 lbs
      CLEARANCES:
      Side wall ...... 22"
      Rear wall ..... 11"
      Corner ......... 13"
  14. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2005
    Messages:
    49,037
    Loc:
    South Puget Sound, WA
    Hang in there, you would be better off with a different stove. I'm not sure what would be the best yet. It might be a good used stove.
  15. KaptJaq

    KaptJaq Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jan 31, 2011
    Messages:
    706
    Loc:
    Long Island, NY
    If you know you want to install a stove:

    1. Make a small opening in the sheet-rock where you expect the fireplace & hearth to be. Just large enough to see what is there and if there is anything left of the old fireplace. Does the stone/tile/brick hearth still extend under the wall into the room?

    2. Take some pictures of whatever you see and the general area around it (including the stairs). Post those picture here.

    3. Start gathering wood for next season.

    The members here will help you get started both safely and as inexpensively as possible...

    It is almost spring. The box stores (home depot, lowes, etc) should be starting to clear out their stock soon. There should also be some used stoves showing up on Craigs List or other sites. You can do a lot better than the Vogelzang Boxwood at a reasonable price.

    KaptJaq
  16. dougand3

    dougand3 Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Oct 16, 2008
    Messages:
    854
    Loc:
    North Alabama
    The good here....the bottom 15% of this boxwood hasn't glowed cherry red near meltdown point!
  17. granpajohn

    granpajohn Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jul 13, 2007
    Messages:
    653
    Loc:
    Central Maryland
    For all its admitted limitations, the VZ Boxer appears to be in the on-deck circle.
    FrogLady may already have experience burning it. (FL, is this true?)

    Also FL...if you have to install the new metal chimney system, that can cost as much as the stove. Good news is, that you can later replace the stove using the same chimney.

Share This Page