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Shorties vs big splits in the 30

Post in 'The Hearth Room - Wood Stoves and Fireplaces' started by BrowningBAR, Jan 2, 2013.

  1. BrowningBAR

    BrowningBAR Minister of Fire

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    I've been filling the 30 with short splits since that is what I have at this point in my wood stack. With the short splits I have been filling the right side of the firebox really tight E/W and then I do a row N/S on the far left side to completely fill the fire box.

    The short splits seem, for me at least, to eliminate wasting space in the firebox. I just got my second 12.5 hour burn cycle (temps at or exceeding 250 degrees.).

    This surprised me since these shorter splits are also smaller in diameter. I figured, if anything, they would burn faster. But, I guess, since I am fitting more wood in the firebox, it doesn't matter as much if the pieces are smaller.
    corey21 and Huntindog1 like this.

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  2. rideau

    rideau Minister of Fire

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    Are you getting them in tigher, with less air space? That might contribute to a longer burn....
  3. BrowningBAR

    BrowningBAR Minister of Fire

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    Correct. The shorter, smaller splits are allowing me to pack the firebox tighter. Far less air space.
  4. Mitch Newton

    Mitch Newton Member

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    I'm also getting into my stack of shorter splits. It definitely helps in loading the box. I also like a load that is part E/W and N/S. The fire gets up to temps quicker. Can't tell if the burn time is better/longer due to so many other factors.
  5. BobUrban

    BobUrban Minister of Fire

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    I do not have perfectly cut wood - ie. it is not all perfect to fit tight into the 30 EW so I often load EW to the left an lay some smaller stuff in the gap on the right for long burns. Just seems to make sense to get it full and subesequently it enlongates the burn cycles. I also will slide a few NS up top of my EW stack if I can - the more wood the hotter/longer between re-fuel. It also is a good wat to get rid of odds and ends stuff.
  6. BrowningBAR

    BrowningBAR Minister of Fire

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    How does the 30 compare to the big old Pre-EPA Defiant you were running?

    I'm running a modern Defiant and the heat output seems to be about the same, with the edge going to the Defiant for heat output and burn times.
  7. BrowningBAR

    BrowningBAR Minister of Fire

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    11 hours in and the stove top is at 275, sides at 320, front at 300.

    Room is at 70 degrees.

    The Defiant is 11 hours into a burn as well. Stove top is at 450, sides are at 300, front are at 400.

    11 hours into the Encore's burn, the griddle is at 300, sides are at 200, front is at 240.
  8. Huntindog1

    Huntindog1 Minister of Fire

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    Mitch and BrowningBAR,

    Having less open space and only a small space up at the top around the tubes will make it much easier to get temps up around those tubes for secondary combustion. Once the secondary combustion starts the stove heats up even more easily. Plus it been pointed out that the more tightly packed stove down below allows the draw of the flue to pull more air in thru the tubes at the top. If you loaded on a good hot bed of coals this all means faster heat up and quicker getting your stove shut down for the over night burn. Getting temps up in the stove quicker before you burn up too much of the wood needed for the longer burn. Thats what is so bad about poor quality wood is it takes alot of it to get temps up in the stove then your left with little wood. Those big fire boxes are nice to get alot of wood in.
    Mitch Newton likes this.
  9. BrowningBAR

    BrowningBAR Minister of Fire

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    Just reloaded both stoves. Both gave me 12+ hours of heat.

    12:13 for the 30. My second 12+ hour burn cycle in a row. This is 12 hours of usable heat. Stove top was still at about 250 with the sides a bit hotter.

    The Defiant was still at 400 degrees and could have gone another hour or two, which means it would have given me 13.5-14.5 hours of heat. But, it is easier to keep the two large stoves on the same loading cycle at this point. And the Defiant's area is more drafty.
    Mitch Newton likes this.
  10. BobUrban

    BobUrban Minister of Fire

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    Vs. the old school stove there is little comparison as far as ease of use, safety and clean hot burning. I get more and longer heat from the 30 for sure. I could get long burns with the old stove but had to go straight Smoke Dragon to get it. I love this stove.
  11. Snotrocket

    Snotrocket Burning Hunk

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    BrowningBar, are you running all 3 stoves at the same time?

    You must be heating 4k sq ft or more, or it's 100 degrees in there.
  12. BrowningBAR

    BrowningBAR Minister of Fire

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    The 272 year old "L" shaped stone wind tunnel comes in at 2,150 sq ft. The room with the 30 can hit 90 if I'm not careful... which it did 3 hours ago.

    Run two stoves during the day, three at night during colder temps. During shoulder season one or two stoves "only."
  13. BobUrban

    BobUrban Minister of Fire

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    do you have photos of the home - sounds great. Well, except for needing 3 stoves!!
  14. Mitch Newton

    Mitch Newton Member

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    BrowningBar how much wood are you going thru yearly? I am struggling with just one stove. LOL
  15. Wood Duck

    Wood Duck Minister of Fire

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    I have a lot of short firewood and load my stove the same way - part E/W with a row N/S. It works very well for me too.
  16. Hogwildz

    Hogwildz Minister of Fire

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    I wonder how it would burn if the splits were stood up on end and packed tightly?
    PapaDave likes this.
  17. Doing The Dixie Eyed Hustle

    Doing The Dixie Eyed Hustle Minister of Fire

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    Burns real sweet in the 13. Got 6 hours out of it, 8 before a reload.

    PRIMO wood.
    PapaDave and BrowningBAR like this.
  18. BrowningBAR

    BrowningBAR Minister of Fire

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    This year will be about 8 cord. Same as last year, but with more firepower this year (9 cu ft of fireboxes as opposed to 7.5-7.8 cu ft).

    I wasted a good amount of wood this shoulder season playing with the new stoves and trying to see what is the best system to use for certain temps. I could probably shave off a cord or so with less enthusiastic burning habits.

    Good fuel and long burn times make this easier. For the most part this winter I only need two stoves going. On milder temps I can get buy with one stove.
  19. bboulier

    bboulier Feeling the Heat

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    I do the same with my Jotul 550 insert and also get "better" and longer burn times. Can definitely cram in more wood this way.
  20. wkpoor

    wkpoor Minister of Fire

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    That house must be a whole lot easier to heat than mine. Best I have ever done, and that seemd downright unbareablely hot, was 79. That was on a sunny day in the 30s outside and no wind. Only place I've ever seen 90 is straight up above the stove measuring the ceiling with an IRgun and the stove top was 850. 20' from the stove it was low 70s.

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