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Should I Cover The Cube?

Post in 'The Wood Shed' started by velvetfoot, Jul 19, 2013.

  1. Defiant

    Defiant Vermont Castings Geek

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    Another volunteer :cool:

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  2. red oak

    red oak Minister of Fire

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    I've stacked pretty much like that - rows close together, 10 deep, right on the ground, uncovered. Never had any problem with rot at all. Wood that was in the middle burned pretty good but not as good as wood on the top and edges. I have only left it sit two years though.
    ScotO, Backwoods Savage and Defiant like this.
  3. Defiant

    Defiant Vermont Castings Geek

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    As you start picking wood, the middle starts to get smaller:cool:
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  4. Pallet Pete

    Pallet Pete Guest

    There is an older gentleman out here who stacks that way and uses PVC drilled full of holes in his pile. He puts in about 15 in a stack like that and claims it dries out really well like that. He's been at it for 62 years. The PVC used to be steel pipes a long time ago he says.

    Pete
    ScotO likes this.
  5. ScotO

    ScotO Guest

    I have given thought to stand up skids in the stacks.....every two rows, stand skids and make two more rows, stand skids and make two more rows.....
    That would also help in the air movement. But I honestly don't have a problem getting it seasoned.....I'd be willing to say most of the wood that I C/S/S'd last year (which is stacked 8 rows deep) would be ready to burn right now.....it's been top covered since last August. The air movement under the stack and the top covering aid greatly in seasoning, especially when you have a 'cube' of wood. Unfortunately, I HAVE to cube my stacks....I simply don't have the room to stack all my wood any other way, due to lack of space here. Not to mention, I kinda like the look of the locomotive-sized woodstack in my backyard! ;)
  6. velvetfoot

    velvetfoot Minister of Fire

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    Well, I covered it this afternoon. Man, it was hot today. I went down about 6" on the front and back and maybe a couple feet on the ends because of the slopes.
    Put a bunch of splits on top and tried stapling as well on the edges.
    (Note to self: be a little more careful with pointy pieces of wood.)

    When I started stacking, I had no idea how many rows it would take, which is which I initially started sloping the left end, vs. cross stacking. It just worked out that I didn't have to add any on the ends.
    I have other stacks, 3 and 4 deep, some not covered), that on days like today, look nice and gray and shrunken (Note to self: tune up the stacks with a tamper so they don't fall like one of their bretheren (the real tall one) did.)

    Next time, I might try splitting a bunch of skinny pieces and using them to lay down on the ground. I just can't take messing with all those pallets, and the local hardware store where I used to get them burns them in an OWB now.

    I trimmed off all the low overhanging branches today as well. It was kinda fun standing on the pile, sans cover of course. It should get more sun now.
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  7. Paulywalnut

    Paulywalnut Minister of Fire

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    Ha, maybe next time. I think velvetfoot can remove every fourth row no problem.;lol
  8. Paulywalnut

    Paulywalnut Minister of Fire

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    Ha Ha, Maybe next time.. I think velvetfoot should be able to take out every fourth row.. No problem;lol
  9. oldspark

    oldspark Guest

    There have been people who have had their wood rot, not sure how 10 rows of wood packed tight is not going to have moisture in the middle for quite some time wihich can lead to rot. People on here sing the praises of air flow and then promply block it.<>
  10. oldspark

    oldspark Guest

    Well I have that much wood and I still stack in single rows all this talk of top cover(single rows really dont need it),and taking 3 years to dry some woods is skewed due to the stacking procedures, its not the best advice for people who are new to woodburning or the ones who dont have the space for 3 years of wood.
  11. Mikel Ward

    Mikel Ward Member

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    Get some pallets
    carefully remove the 2 center stacks and place on pallets
    Be careful the remaining inside stacks might be unstable
    then top cover
  12. Mitch Newton

    Mitch Newton Member

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    With splits that small you should be ok in 2 yr.
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  13. red oak

    red oak Minister of Fire

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    Yes if you only have the space for one year's worth of wood single rows are the way to go. I'm sure it dries significantly faster that way, and getting it off the ground helps a lot too. If you stack like myself or the OP you just need to be prepared for the wood to take several years to dry.
  14. oldspark

    oldspark Guest

    My point was I DO have that much wood and still stack in single rows red oak, your post reads like I dont have the room, I have read numerous articles about drying wood for fire wood and and lumber and air flow is key.
  15. red oak

    red oak Minister of Fire

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    No argument here about the air flow. I wasn't trying to comment on the wood that you have. I was simply saying that if you have to season it quick single rows are the way to go. If you have time you can afford to put the rows closer together. It will season that way but slower of course.
  16. oldspark

    oldspark Guest

    Like I said in some cases I would be worried about rot, do not have the details on what they did but I know it happens, plus I have been told I was full of crap for saying I did not have bugs in my wood, well I dont, cant help but think part of it is due to the single rows and air flow.
  17. Backwoods Savage

    Backwoods Savage Minister of Fire

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    Strange that at times I've stacked over 20 rows together and have never experienced rot in the wood stacks.
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  18. ScotO

    ScotO Guest

    Top covering is relative to your climate....I can tell you if I hadn't top-covered my wood (single rows, double rows, or 10 rows deep) I'd have been screwed the past couple of seasons...

    Top covering it also keeps the constant dampness from the rain getting into the bark and that dampness in the bark is a hotbed for bugs......very few bugs in my stacks, because it stays dry.

    Ever look into how a lumber kiln works? They keep it very high humidity, but add lots of heat to the kiln, to help "dry" the wood. What they are essentially doing is only "cooking" the moisture out of the wood, but the outside of the wood stays moist (to keep it from splitting). The black rubber roofing covering on my stacks must help drive the temperature up in there, because I don't even have mice or chippies living in the woodstack.......So again, air movement is good, but so is heat and top covering......

    2012-09-02_12-48-41_629.jpg
  19. rdust

    rdust Minister of Fire

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    I agree, every time I see stacks like this I wonder how the center can be dry even after three years. I once stacked 5 rows deep and after 3 years the wood in the center rows was no drier than the day I stacked it. Most of my rows now are singles, I have some in doubles but I try to give them extra time.
  20. Ram 1500 with an axe...

    Ram 1500 with an axe... Minister of Fire

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    As a rookie, viewing this photo made me cringe, it is the complete opposite of what all you great guys are trying to teach me...I seem to be moving wood all the time, I would suggest moving some rows out, at least
  21. bogydave

    bogydave Minister of Fire

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    Not gonna dry real fast the way you have it stacked
    But it sure looks good! :)

    If you don't need it for a few years & can keep the rain off with a top cover you
    should be fine.
    Stuff on the bottom is gonna rot & have insects, but just the bottom layer or 2.

    Real nice uniform size splits on the ends. :)
  22. chvymn99

    chvymn99 Minister of Fire

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  23. splions

    splions Member

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    I stack all my wood on two pallets and leave plenty of room around it for air to ciculate
  24. ScotO

    ScotO Guest

    around 27 FULL cord.....give or take! I'm around 4 years ahead.
  25. oldspark

    oldspark Guest

    Very!

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