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should i insulate my cellar?

Post in 'The Pellet Mill - Pellet and Multifuel Stoves' started by deadeye316, Dec 14, 2007.

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  1. deadeye316

    deadeye316 New Member

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    I am doing whatever i can to improve my home heating situation. I am getting a pellet stove installed later this month on the first floor in 2 story house with laminate floors throughout the first floor. Will insulating my cellar help out at all?

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  2. Shane

    Shane Minister of Fire

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    I don't know about the cellar walls etc. but the ceiling of the cellar should probably be insulated.
  3. billb3

    billb3 Minister of Fire

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    Everything I've been reading lately says no (fuel savings) benifit.

    However, in the basement (full basement) the end joists over the foundation wall <<should>> be insulated and all leaks found and sealed. (some places require fire stop coverings) Windows, doors, sills, wire and pipe entrances etc. Aiming for mice entries at the same time. Often filling cracks with brass wool (steel wool rusts) so the mice don't just chew their way through the insulation.


    I've been tempted to insulate between the joists under the bathroom cold ceramic tiles to see if it helps (with cold toes) but haven't.
  4. Jabberwocky

    Jabberwocky New Member

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    Been wondering the same thing since this year the NG furnace is not running, the basement it is much colder. 1/2 the basement is below grade/ 1/2 above. It seems like my feet are colder now that the basement is so cool (mostly wood floors on 1st floor)
  5. deadeye316

    deadeye316 New Member

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    I was just thinking because i plan finishing the basement in the future it could be the first step. I guess it cant hurt.
  6. webbie

    webbie Seasoned Moderator Staff Member

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    I think codes in ma. (and elsewhere) dictate insulation in the cellar, since ours came that way. I would imagine it helps hold heat into the envelope - but if you are going to finish (and heat) the basement, it may do nothing - since you may want the basement heat to rise up and warm the floor.
  7. MainePellethead

    MainePellethead Minister of Fire

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    I havent put ina stove yet...but we are right after the holiday. In my basement I have a small size old cast iron radiator that when I had my furnace put in they installed the radiator that runs off my furnace with the loop. It heats my basement hotter than upstairs lol. So...when the pellet stove is in I expect my basement to cool down alittle ....but it has to come on for hot water so as it does the basement will stay pretty warm. I may in the future as we finish off the basement maybe put a gas heater downstairs for extra warmth.
  8. pete324rocket

    pete324rocket Feeling the Heat

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    insulating the basement wall with foam insulation will make all the difference in the world. Its all about " thermal bridges" which suck the heat out of the basement walls. Liken it to sitting on a tiolet seat made of foam vs one made of concrete.
  9. billb3

    billb3 Minister of Fire

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    Insulating the walls (inside) makes sense (if they haven't been outside).
    The ground is essentially 50 degrees.

    I've been reading up a bit on berm building and one thing that keeps popping up is strong evidence that dry earth is a much better insulator than wet earth. Which may explain why my current cellar is rather warm compared to many others (Ma.). I have quite a bit of slope away from my house, the water sheds right off, and in the Winter I put longer downspout drains on because they're not in the way of the lawnmower.
  10. eernest4

    eernest4 New Member

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    If there is no heat source in the basement, it will go down to 50 * like the outside soil.

    If you insulate the basement & there is still no heat source in the basement, it will still go down to 50 *, just like the outside soil, only it will take longer to do so.

    Insulation makes sense if there is some kind of heat source in the basement, even if it is only heat radiated from the first floor.

    I always thought that insulation was a barrier to heat transfer & without a heat source in the basement, what is the insulation doing, except maybe preventing cold outside drafts from entering.

    Most cement basements, 1/2 below grade, without insulation, stay between 55* & 60* ,
    without a heat source.

    I suspect, even with insulation & without a basement heat source all you will see down there is 60 *

    If anyone has different info from experience, I would very much like to hear it, as i might consider insulating my basement for summer of 09. A new epa wood stove & a new roof are for summer 08.
  11. Ahshucks

    Ahshucks New Member

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    If you have a poured basement, insulation is a wise low cost investment to save on a great amount of heat loss. Insulating duct work can be beneficial also. Block basements have the air space between the walls to help retain heat that poured basements don't have. Use regular 2x4 wall construction and not the firring strips with styro. Plastic sheeting should be against the wall to prevent moisture and air leak. If you are considering placing a stove in the basement, a dehumidifier is essential to keep your new appliance from rusting.
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