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Shoulder season,how to, not over heat the house ?

Post in 'Classic Wood Stove Forums (prior to approx. 1993)' started by HDRock, Nov 1, 2012.

  1. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    For shoulder seasons, just burn a much smaller, hot fire and let it go out.
    corey21 and tfdchief like this.

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  2. lopiliberty

    lopiliberty Minister of Fire

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    Since you already have an 8in flue way not look at a blaze king. Not the cheapest stove out there but at least you won't be cooked out of your house during shoulders seasons
  3. HDRock

    HDRock Minister of Fire

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    Thanks for ,suggestion, I looked at stoves a little bit, but I don't know what is good or bad, I don't know much about the new stoves at all, I have been searching around, and, reading on here, learning a little.
    It sounds like I may need to match a stove to the chimney I have,IDK, to avoid having to redo the chimney. Is that correct?
    Anyway, I will do some homework on the blaze King
  4. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    The big BK King uses 8" but that is not be your only option. There are other stoves and it could be that a 6" stove will work. It depends on the current flue setup. If the chimney draws well then a 6" flue outlet stove might work perfectly well with it. Based on the size of the house I suspect you will do fine with a much smaller stove like the 6" flue outlet BK Sirocco or Princess, Woodstock Fireview or Buck 20 (or Buck 80 for 8" flue), if looking at cat stoves. But there are good non-cat stoves that will do the job as well. If you have questions about new stoves, start a new thread in the main hearth forums and we'll help you out there.
  5. peakbagger

    peakbagger Minister of Fire

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    I have known a few folks who have a Jotul 602 (small stove) for shoulder season and then switch over to a larger stove once its gets real cold.
  6. BrowningBAR

    BrowningBAR Minister of Fire

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    You mean they have two stoves installed or they uninstall the Jotul and put in a larger stove?
  7. Boog

    Boog Minister of Fire

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    The shoulder season (thanks - I never heard that term before) was always a challenge for me with my early 80's Charmaster wood/oil combo forced air furnace. I was constantly baking myself out of there, walking around in my underware all the time. I ultimately worked out the best method for me which was to build small fires, but always put at least one bigger log in there to keep some coals going. After the smaller fire burned out, the coals under the bigger piece would easily start the next "small fire" by just throwing some small stuff on them. I always cut my wood all the way down to about 1.5" branch tips, very little gets wasted on my place. Obviously I have the oil backup, but over time I even disconnected some of the "auto" controls to manually run a better wood fire. I'm retired now, and home most of the time to feed it just right. The fire that I started in early October has never died out yet, even when I empty out ashes to the pan underneath, I always leave a good bunch of coals left and just feed it again. The only time it ever gets "totally burned out" is about twice during the winter when I disconnect the back pipes off it to clean between the furnace and the 12" clay lined chimney. I will build up in that section of pipe to the point of restricting flow if I don't clean it out about twice during the season.
  8. HDRock

    HDRock Minister of Fire

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    Yeah I have been known to stripe down to a pair of shorts

    I have been wondering what people, consider the size, in inches, of a small split, medium split and a large split ???
    Whats the biggest size piece you use, to burn ???
    I have been doing pretty good , not cookin by butt with small fires.
  9. HDRock

    HDRock Minister of Fire

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    My current stove is actually a 6" outlet with an adaptor,8'' single wall pipe, steel chimney, straight up ,and pulls a good draft

    IMG_20121109_051645.jpg
  10. Boog

    Boog Minister of Fire

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    Well HDRock, small would be down around the 1.5" branch tips I cut, large would be anything I can get in my 11x13" door up to 30" long :cool:. For the purposes of the shoulder season discussion, I'm burning 1.5 - 3" stuff topped off with maybe a 7 - 9" piece for a "coal log". I usually burn things in the 16-18" length range.... sometimes in deep winter approaching 24". I've never put a 30" in mine although I could!
  11. HDRock

    HDRock Minister of Fire

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    Thanks , Boog

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