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Single wall pipe clearance?

Post in 'The Hearth Room - Wood Stoves and Fireplaces' started by mudr, Oct 4, 2013.

  1. mudr

    mudr Member

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    Jan 7, 2013
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    Hi guys,
    I've got a company lined up to install my new Englander 30. They were supposed to do it today, but backed out due to a wet roof and the possibility of lightening. When the phone lady called to cancel, I asked her if they did have me down for single wall interior, as they wrote a quote for two scenarios, double or single. She said that she did indeed have me down for single wall but the cost was going to be the same as the double as he was bringing half round heat shields because of clearance issues with the single wall pipe.

    Now, I've 18 inches of clearance to work with (the double wall option would have allowed me to "center" the hole in the wall horizontally above my tile, it would have been aesthetics only), and told them I wanted to save the ~$250 by going single. The quote guy didn't have a problem with the single wall clearance, never mentioned heat shields, and said that this quote "would be the maximum price, it won't be higher". Now these shields increase the price.

    I will end by saying this: I have dealt with this woman on the phone a handful of times, and each time I've talked to her she has said something that was 100% incorrect. I don't trust her word that much. An example can be found here: http://www.hearth.com/talk/threads/englanders-in-new-york-allowed-ul.113244/

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  2. oldspark

    oldspark Guest

  3. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    If your installation can accommodate 18" clearances for single-wall pipe and the mfg. requirements for minimum clearances to combustibles, then there is no need for the pipe shields. One caveat, how long will the connector pipe run be and how tall is the total flues system going to end up being? If the run is long, or with a couple 90 deg turns, you may be better off getting the double-wall to keep the flue gases hotter.

    From the sounds of things your experience with this person has been consistently unhelpful and exasperating. I would go to the shop in person and speak the owner to get the record straight.
  4. mudr

    mudr Member

    Joined:
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    Connector pipe will be 2-3 ft horizontal, but then ~25ish feet up. I'm not overly concerned about draft. I had an almost identical system in my previous house, I felt the draft was too strong. It would take off on me quite a bit in cooler weather (all gaskets tight)
  5. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    With that amount of pipe it's not draft I would be concerned about, it's creosote. Stove mfg. recommend no more than 8ft of single-wall for this reason. It wouldn't surprise me if there was a 300+ degree drop in that long connector. When the flue gases drop below 250F there will be creosote condensation. If the wood is not very well seasoned this accumulation will be very high making it a fire trap.
    A1Stoves.com likes this.
  6. oldspark

    oldspark Guest

    I dont like 25 feet of connector pipe single or double wall.
  7. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    Some have no choice, but is certainly had better be well supported.
  8. oldspark

    oldspark Guest

    That I can understand but would not make me feel good about the install. or feel safe with it. Being aware of the pit falls and how to manage it will help for sure.
  9. mudr

    mudr Member

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    I may have misunderstood you. 25 ft was of class-a going up outside. Make more sense?
  10. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    Loc:
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    Yes, a whole lot more sense. Much better. Be sure that horizontal run has at least a 1/4" per foot uphill slope toward the chimney.

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