1. Welcome Hearth.com Guests and Visitors - Please enjoy our forums!
    Hearth.com GOLD Sponsors who help bring the site content to you:
    Hearthstone Soapstone and Cast-Iron stoves( Wood, Gas or Pellet Stoves and Inserts)
    Caluwe - Passion for Fire and Water ( Pellet and Wood Hydronic and Space Heating)

Single wall to double

Post in 'The Hearth Room - Wood Stoves and Fireplaces' started by Oakwilt, Aug 22, 2014.

  1. Oakwilt

    Oakwilt New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 22, 2014
    Messages:
    25
    Loc:
    Wi
    Hello, my question is in regards to pipe connection, I currently have a hearth stone stove with 6" double wall pipe from the stove straight up and out to top of chimney and works fine, however, we are looking at a used jotul f-400 for additional heat in another room, finally here's the question, would it be advisable to have a 3' run of single wall pipe to start with instead of going double wall all the way from start to finish? Reason I'm thinking this way is I believe you lose useable heat in the home with a complete double system and even 3' would recover a lot of that loss, I am aware of draft issues, this would also be a straight up and out system, thanks.

    Helpful Sponsor Ads!





  2. Jags

    Jags Moderate Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Aug 2, 2006
    Messages:
    15,080
    Loc:
    Northern IL
    New epa stoves are stingy with heat loss up the stack. Whatever they let go up the stack really needs to stay there. I guess what I am try to say is - go with the double wall.
  3. Oakwilt

    Oakwilt New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 22, 2014
    Messages:
    25
    Loc:
    Wi
    Thanks for the input, my wife thinks I'm crazy for wanting another stove anyway however after last winter it's justified, but I think the difference between adding an additional stove or not may be a single wall pipe on the hearth stone to the ceiling, it's my only complaint with that unit, guess it's just old school thought, " there's a lot of heat coming off that pipe"
  4. Jags

    Jags Moderate Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Aug 2, 2006
    Messages:
    15,080
    Loc:
    Northern IL
    And there can be truth to that, but you really don't want to rob that heat unless you have an unnatural attraction to your chimney brush.:p
  5. firefighterjake

    firefighterjake Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2008
    Messages:
    15,237
    Loc:
    Unity/Bangor, Maine
    Heat the home with the woodstove . . . not the chimney . . . at least that's my philosophy.
  6. BobUrban

    BobUrban Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2010
    Messages:
    1,591
    Loc:
    Central Michigan
    I agree with what has been posted but I also think there is potential for the right set up to limit the effect of lost heat as it pertains to internal chimney issues while providing more heat to the inside of the home. My thoughts(and this is just opinion with no science to back it up) is:

    A cathedral ceiling with complete straight shot chimney and pipe that has a long stretch of pipe before entering a short stretch of chimney with 90% of the system inside so always warm. This way you are getting some pipe heat to stick around but not loosing so much that your creo creator is working overtime. Just a thought coming from someone that goes with Dbl wall on his system.
  7. Highbeam

    Highbeam Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Dec 28, 2006
    Messages:
    9,122
    Loc:
    base of Mt. Rainier on the wet side, WA
    The room may be warm but not 250 degrees warm so it is stealing heat from the single wall.

    The stack doesn't need to stay hot, above 250 @ the cap is the minimum. Many designs, including hearthstones waste tons of heat up the flue in anticipation of people using single wall and/or poor design.

    With a noncat, single wall is fine. Refer to your manual and you will probably find the limit on length for single.

    I do agree with the above that the stove is the heater. Dont depend on the pipe for heat.
  8. Oakwilt

    Oakwilt New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 22, 2014
    Messages:
    25
    Loc:
    Wi
    When the wife and I decided on a new stove, our heart was set on an equinox, but the dealer talked me out of it saying it's too large for our heating needs so we went smaller and now I'm here posting about needing another stove and trying to squeeze out a bit of heat from the Mansfield by considering single wall pipe, let this be a lesson to anyone thinking of which stove to get "if you can afford the bigger one get it." I do agree with the idea of heating with the unit and not the pipe however in our situation a little more BTUs might be all we need for me to really love the stove vs adding an additional stove, thanks for the opinions!

Share This Page