1. Welcome Hearth.com Guests and Visitors - Please enjoy our forums!
    Hearth.com GOLD Sponsors who help bring the site content to you:
    Hearthstone Soapstone and Cast-Iron stoves( Wood, Gas or Pellet Stoves and Inserts)

Sizzlin' Sulfur Burgers Over Coal

Post in 'The Hearth Room - Wood Stoves and Fireplaces' started by Martin Strand III, Mar 6, 2006.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. Martin Strand III

    Martin Strand III New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2005
    Messages:
    763
    Loc:
    NW MI near nowhere
    Grillin' over hot apple or cherry wood coals can't be beat.

    That said, I've got this grill that fits into the Harman TLC 2000, which of course burns wood and coal.

    Anybody tried cooking over a direct anthracite coal fire (amped down considerably) for that new experience in culinary catastrophes?

    In know there's lots of bad stuff in wood smoke and coal exhausts crud also plus sulfur. I just haven't heard anything about grilling over a coal fire - have you?

    Aye,
    Marty

    Helpful Sponsor Ads!





  2. MountainStoveGuy

    MountainStoveGuy Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2006
    Messages:
    3,654
    Loc:
    Boulder County
    Back home, we had a big pit that would burn hickory and mesquite logs in, and cook over them when they were coals. Best way to cook in my opinion. I dont see why you cant do the same in your stove. I dont because i dont think pine will taste very good.
    Ryan
  3. wahoowad

    wahoowad Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Dec 19, 2005
    Messages:
    1,575
    Loc:
    Virginia
    30 years ago I roasted some hotdogs over fresh pine twigs. Still haven't forgotten that taste.
  4. berlin

    berlin New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 6, 2006
    Messages:
    299
    Loc:
    Western NY
    people cook over open coal fires all the time all over the world. The only place where this has gotten considerable attention is southern china because the coals there have undergone "mineralization" and are astoundingly high in arsenic, flouride, and other bad minerals of which a small percentage transfer to foods, and over many years lead to poisoning by these elements. In the US and most of the world this is not a concern. I've personally grilled over bituminous coal (letting the volitles burn off first) and had great success and no unwanted flavors. BTW, charcoal briquettes that are available in stores throughout the nation are mostly comprised of ground and compacted anthricite coal.
  5. Corey

    Corey Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Nov 19, 2005
    Messages:
    2,152
    Loc:
    Midwest
  6. berlin

    berlin New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 6, 2006
    Messages:
    299
    Loc:
    Western NY
    thats funny.
    Realize that just because the package says "mesquite" charcoal briquettes does not mean the briquettes are from 100% mequite wood. or hickory. or any wood.

    A Kingsford Company spokeswoman stated: "Briquettes are preferred by Americans for their uniform size and stable heat." She mentions their ingredients, which include: powdered charcoal, anthracite coal for long burning, limestone to create ash, starch as binders, and sawdust and sodium nitrate for quick lighting. "The starch is perfectly natural and the coal is high-quality."
  7. Metal

    Metal Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2005
    Messages:
    681
    As long as your stove pipe complies with NFPA 96 and is listed UL 1978 you shouldn't have any problems using your stove for cooking (lol, I am starting to sound like Elk).
  8. Martin Strand III

    Martin Strand III New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2005
    Messages:
    763
    Loc:
    NW MI near nowhere
    Not too interested in third world cooking methods where the life expectancy is somewhere between 35 - 45 years so it won't matter much what you eat off of, or inhale or cook with. And trying it once without problems doesn't cut it. Get my drift?

    I'm asking if many/any out there who peruse this Forum actually routinely cook over hard coal and what's the "Press" on it?

    As far as briquettes go - there's better than boiling your food but not much. To "do it right", you need an open fire with apple, cherry or hickory coals OR 100% Natural Hardwood Charcoal (not pressed pillow briquettes, no fillers, no addatives) for the higher heat seared texture and flavor.

    I know. Can't please everyone. Some my actually prefer boiled chicken...

    Aye,
    Marty
  9. berlin

    berlin New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 6, 2006
    Messages:
    299
    Loc:
    Western NY
    well, if your that worried about it why bother cooking over it at all?? use your electric stove if you're scared; I doubt a few people on this forum saying they routinely cook over anthricite would give any indication of whether or not it's healthy, what are they supposed to say; "well i'm still alive and kick'in so it must be ok"?

    Nonetheless, understand this that "wonderfull all-natural wood" your cooking over produces more of each of the carcinogenic Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons even while being burned properly than anthricite coal:

    Flourenthene
    Pyrene
    Benzoanthricine
    Chrysene
    Benzoflourenthene
    Indenopyrene
    Benzopyrene
    Dibenzoanthricene
    Benzoperylene

    The percentage of these and other chemicals increases as o2 to the wood fire decreases; so if you get visable smoke like you would when trying to flavor foods you could easily double the amount of these chemicals from that of anthricite.
  10. Martin Strand III

    Martin Strand III New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2005
    Messages:
    763
    Loc:
    NW MI near nowhere
    Berlin:

    Scientific study? Are you for real?

    I'm asking if people who cook over hard coal "like it" compared to other ways: wood fires, gas grills, yada. And, if there are any known health risks they know of by using coal vs wood, gas.

    I know you pointed some of this out. Thank you. Now I'd like to hear from others.

    Aye,
    Marty
  11. carpniels

    carpniels Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Dec 6, 2005
    Messages:
    536
    Loc:
    Rome, NY, USA
    Hi Marty,

    Yep, those things are formed during incomplete combustion. That is why your car has a catalytic converter. To burn these bad chemicals so we don't die to early.

    That is also why you should have as little smoke as possible when you use your gas BBQ. No smoke means better combustion so less PAHs.

    Good Luck

    CarpNiels
  12. Martin Strand III

    Martin Strand III New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2005
    Messages:
    763
    Loc:
    NW MI near nowhere
    Hi Carpniels:

    The gas flames I've seen from a BBQ don't smoke at all. The only smoke I've seen comes from the drippings igniting in the flames and burn off from a previously used grill which is probably the same thing (burning fat). Is that what you meant? It doesn't tote a heap with me much anyway since I don't use (nat or LPG) gas to BBQ. I'm into natural wood charcoal, not the briquettes, or my wood fired bake oven.

    Aye,
    Marty

    Grandma used to say, "Living well is the best revenge."
  13. mlouwho

    mlouwho New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 23, 2006
    Messages:
    56
    Hey Marty,

    If you are still wondering about this, I have often cooked on the TLC200 while burning coal, excellent flavor!!!!!!! Give it a try & let us know.
  14. Martin Strand III

    Martin Strand III New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2005
    Messages:
    763
    Loc:
    NW MI near nowhere
    OK.

    I've grilled several meats ('carpe carne') over sulfur flames from a coal burn: no big deal; i.e., tastes grilled, no extra heartburn/gas, no wierd lumps or bumps appearing anywhere on me yet albeit no scientific study. Can't do this year 'round as coal fires are NG except when it's cold out.

    I still prefer the taste of grilling anytime of year over natural wood charcoal in my "Big Green Egg" or the wood fired bake oven in the masonry heater. But that's just me.

    Aye,
    Marty
  15. Martin Strand III

    Martin Strand III New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2005
    Messages:
    763
    Loc:
    NW MI near nowhere
    Yup.

    The Big Green Egg is a modern version of the ancient kamado, troubled by cracking, breaking, yada. This thing I use year round in rain, snow, sleet, ice storms and even when it's nice out. Only the wood and metal parts have needed replacement in the 8 or so years I've been enjoying it. But I do now remember replacing the original steel grate holding the coals (it split in half) with a cast iron one. It grills, slow roasts, smokes, bakes, you name it. Tasty and juicy are its hallmarks, but a brat will always be a brat whereas a pork tenderloin or turkey is elevated to whole new level of culinary delight.

    Aye,
    Marty

    The Mrs used to say, "Dinner is done when the smoke alarm goes off."
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Share This Page