Slab as a heat storage

Beno Posted By Beno, Feb 10, 2008 at 4:01 AM

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  1. ISeeDeadBTUs

    ISeeDeadBTUs
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    If you post the pics of your maid doing the housework when it's too hot and sweaty in the house, do it while Eric's en-route to work so I have a chance to see her ;-)
     
  2. Eric Johnson

    Eric Johnson
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    Nov 18, 2005
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    Oh, thanks for the heads up Jimbo. Now I have to start varying my schedule and working odd hours, or rig up wi-fi for the truck so I can monitor your activities at stoplights.
     
  3. SE Iowa

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    Ok, so if you really want to see me (6' 200lbs, balding, hairy, goatie, etc) in nothing but a little french maids outfit, I suppose I could get pictures. I'd suggest a psychiatrist though, you might need it if that is your thing.
     
  4. Beno

    Beno
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    Feb 26, 2007
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    I believe the source of confusion was by the statement that the slab is used to storage heat. In conventional way, we store heat for later use, so the heat is not used now but later, when needed. The forum reaction was that this will make too hot in the house. Correct.
    In my setup though, when I heat the slab I store the heat needed for comfort zone, 70-75 F, not extra heat. When the slab cools down few degrees, I run full speed the EKO, to raise the temperature back.
    We saw already that 10 F needs hundreds of KBtus, so the EKO should be happy.
     
  5. ISeeDeadBTUs

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    The water going in to my basement slab is generally 80-90* depending on the outside control and Vitotronic. Coming back varies. At the start of pumping, it comes back at like 60*, due I presume from sitting there stagnant. But once it gets going, them coming back is usually within like 10* of going in. I don't know a damn thing about thermal dynamics, but can concrete that is heated to 80* release more than 80* into the air? If so, then I think you might have to be careful about over heating. If the answer to the aforesaid mentioned question is "no", then I think you are on the right track. Only I'd make the slab much thicker for more storage. As with all things wood related, heating concrete is a momentum thang. Once you got it down you could automate the heat on/off cycle so that the slab finished heating about the time the house needed the radiation.

    Trust me, if I didn't need phchiatric evaluation before, the split-second mental image of a bald, hairy guy with a goatee was enough to send me over the edge. Anyone have any spare meds they're not usin'? BTW . . . isn't BALD an oxymoron when used in cunjunction with a hairy goatee??
     
  6. Eric Johnson

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    So the French Maid uniform doesn't enter into it, Jimbo? Veeeeeerrrrrrryyyyy interestink!
     
  7. SciGuy

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    [quote author="ISeeDeadBTUs" date="1202784152"]The water going in to my basement slab is generally 80-90* depending on the outside control and Vitotronic. Coming back varies. At the start of pumping, it comes back at like 60*, due I presume from sitting there stagnant. But once it gets going, them coming back is usually within like 10* of going in. I don't know a damn thing about thermal dynamics, but can concrete that is heated to 80* release more than 80* into the air? quote]

    My old Wirsbo manual shows that a bare slab with 1/2" tubing on 12" centers will emit 15BTUs per square foot into a 65 degree room when using an 80 degree F water temperature. If you were to use 90 degree water instead the BTU emission jumps to ~ 25 per square foot. I would agree that counting on the slab as a means of heat storage will lead to a very uncomfortable house.

    Hugh
     
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