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So I Found This Old Moss Covered Log.....

Post in 'The Wood Shed' started by Ralphie Boy, Feb 6, 2013.

  1. Ralphie Boy

    Ralphie Boy Minister of Fire

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    So while cutting some ash my neighbor gave me (see "Ask and Ye Shall Receive") I found this old log covered in green moss. Just for giggles and grins I cut it. Look what I found!:eek: I can't tell what it is but it's quite dense and most of it seems to be usable. Even the discolored wedge I cut out of it is rock solid. As soon as I can get a piece split I'll post for and i.d. You just never know!

    DSC_0112 (1000x664).jpg DSC_0114 (1000x664).jpg DSC_0115 (1000x664).jpg DSC_0116 (1000x664).jpg

    Notice the left log; I've already marked it to cut.

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  2. TimJ

    TimJ Minister of Fire

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    Ralphie Boy, you have just discovered the secret gem of the woods. I, my little grasshopper, have embelished in its lovliness.
    You have red elm ..................
  3. Ralphie Boy

    Ralphie Boy Minister of Fire

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    Master, you are wise in the way of the woods! That dude will be in rounds and my pile tomorrow;)
  4. fishingpol

    fishingpol Minister of Fire

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    With that beautiful grain, it would be put up a year or so in my woodshop awaiting the band saw. I'd like to see that milled up into slabs. Where is the drooling smiley face?
    ScotO and Thistle like this.
  5. Thistle

    Thistle Minister of Fire

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    Looks like a bookcase or small toolchest to me there.....
    ScotO and fishingpol like this.
  6. fishingpol

    fishingpol Minister of Fire

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    When you split it, can you post a few pics of the grain. I just gotta see what it looks like.
    ScotO and Ralphie Boy like this.
  7. fishingpol

    fishingpol Minister of Fire

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    Agreed, some type of box with a running grain on all sides.
  8. Ralphie Boy

    Ralphie Boy Minister of Fire

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    Will Do!
  9. Thistle

    Thistle Minister of Fire

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    Cut away that spalting (would've been better color before it set in 3-4 yrs ago IMO) & you could still salvage 75% at least of that 1 chunk...
  10. Jon1270

    Jon1270 Minister of Fire

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    It's amazing the conditions some wood will survive. A few months ago I answered a CL ad from a contractor who wanted to give away firewood that had been sitting in the yard of a burnt-out abandoned house he was rehabbing. When I got there I found a haphazard pile of rotten silver maple rounds, mushrooms growing everywhere. *Under* the maple, sitting directly in the dirt, were several large rounds of mulberry, the ends weathered black and the bark richly decorated with some odd orange mold. I split a few of the mulberry rounds open and they were perfect - not a hint of punkiness after who knows how many years in the mud.
    ScotO, Thistle and TimJ like this.
  11. Thistle

    Thistle Minister of Fire

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    Oh yeah,Mulberry is quite resistant to decay.Not like its cousin Osage Orange/Hedge,but well above average.Old times in lots of areas of the midwest & south would use Mulberry for fence posts on their land.I've used smaller long splits for various outdoor/garden stakes,will last like White Oak if its all heartwood.
    ScotO likes this.
  12. ScotO

    ScotO Guest

    Here you go, Jon.....

    [​IMG]
  13. BobUrban

    BobUrban Minister of Fire

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    Just cut some red oak the other day that had been down for 5+yrs and although there was some outer punk the majority was/is great fire wood! Agreed - you never know until you dip the chain in there.

    Regarding osage - It lasts longer than iron(potentially) I have dug osage logs out of a ditch that had been laying there for who knows how many years with annual complete submersion and laying 1/2 or more in mud that dried to cement later in the summer. After removing the outside of the logs it was golden and solid inside and made great longbows!! Not sure if anything will last in adverse conditions like osage(or burn hotter!!)
    Backwoods Savage likes this.
  14. Jags

    Jags Moderate Moderator Staff Member

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    Yep, red elm, I believe. I swear some of that stuff will hit the forest floor and petrify. I have noticed this in smaller trees more so than the larger one. And that stuff won't split too bad either.
  15. Redlegs

    Redlegs Feeling the Heat

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    Hedge or Osage will last almost forever in the woods. I've cut some that looked like old black iron, but burned like coal. The good part about mullberry is that there are no hedge thorns.
    Ralphie Boy likes this.

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