So they say burn one hot fire per month? LOL with pic

CHeath Posted By CHeath, Mar 4, 2013 at 9:03 PM

  1. CHeath

    CHeath
    Member 2.
    NULL
    

    Feb 18, 2013
    210
    54
    Loc:
    Northwest NorthCarolina Mtns
    I DO NOT like high temps especially being a greenhorn but this was the last stage on my burn levels. Reached the big five 00 just now. The flue started popping around 475 but I held in reluctantly. All is well I think. I still wished I knew what a target temp as well as a max temp for a flue like mine would be. 6 inch 24 gauge pipe, clay lined chimney. House is 30 years old chimney is 3 weeks out of virgin status.
    image.jpg
     
  2. firefighterjake

    firefighterjake
    Minister of Fire 2.
    NULL
    

    Jul 22, 2008
    17,517
    3,798
    Loc:
    Unity/Bangor, Maine
    Not sure who "they" are . . . I always figure on burning not too hot and not too cold -- burning in the Goldilocks Zone seems to work for me . . . hot enough to minimize the production of creosote, but not so hot that it ignites any creosote in the chimney (that's why I sweep.)
     
    Lumber-Jack likes this.
  3. CHeath

    CHeath
    Member 2.
    NULL
    

    Feb 18, 2013
    210
    54
    Loc:
    Northwest NorthCarolina Mtns
    and that zone would be?
     
  4. Bocefus78

    Bocefus78
    Minister of Fire 2.
    NULL
    

    Jul 27, 2010
    538
    173
    Loc:
    Just Outside Indy
    I dont own an IR gun and I cant measure stack temps (insert owner) but I have to believe you have another 200-300 degrees before my butthole would be puckering. That is assuming your clay is SS lined. What are your Stove top temps when the stack is at 500?
     
  5. Jags

    Jags
    Moderate Moderator 2.
    NULL
    
    Staff Member

    Aug 2, 2006
    17,422
    6,039
    Loc:
    Northern IL
    When you say "clay" is there a liner, or are you dumping into clay?
     
  6. CHeath

    CHeath
    Member 2.
    NULL
    

    Feb 18, 2013
    210
    54
    Loc:
    Northwest NorthCarolina Mtns
    No SS liner. Chimney never used so it would be throwing away money. I could see if it had been used for 30 years but it has not.
     
  7. CHeath

    CHeath
    Member 2.
    NULL
    

    Feb 18, 2013
    210
    54
    Loc:
    Northwest NorthCarolina Mtns
    It's not a free standing stove so not sure what the temps are on the top. It's a furnace style stove.
     
  8. Jags

    Jags
    Moderate Moderator 2.
    NULL
    
    Staff Member

    Aug 2, 2006
    17,422
    6,039
    Loc:
    Northern IL
    This could be debated, but if it is working well for ya, burn on Brother.
     
    PapaDave and Ralphie Boy like this.
  9. WoodpileOCD

    WoodpileOCD
    Minister of Fire 2.
    NULL
    

    Jan 19, 2011
    722
    109
    Loc:
    Central NC
    U
    I don't see it as a new or old chimney thing but the fact you are dumping a 6"pipe into a 8x12 or 1316 chimney designed for an open fireplace. What you are describing is a slammer install. You'll find lots of information on the site regarding those types of installs. Had one myself. Once I put a liner in I saw a world of difference in the operation of my insert. Keep a close check on your creosote buildup
     
  10. oldspark

    oldspark
    Guest 2.
    NULL
    

    Well clay liners will take very high temps before damaged so you are fine with the 511, the safe range on most flue gauges is aroung 250 to 450 or so, but going above that for a short period of time is no problem.
     
  11. oldspark

    oldspark
    Guest 2.
    NULL
    

    I dont remember reading what size liner he had, I used to have a 7 1/4 inch round clay liner.
     
  12. oldspark

    oldspark
    Guest 2.
    NULL
    

    Dont let them tell you to change out your chimney, you are the one that knows how well it works.
     
    nate379 likes this.
  13. CHeath

    CHeath
    Member 2.
    NULL
    

    Feb 18, 2013
    210
    54
    Loc:
    Northwest NorthCarolina Mtns

    Not sure where you got my flue sizes, Im not using an open fireplace flue. I have 3 pipes, 2 for the open fireplace upstairs and one running into the basement for my wood stove. all three are lined with clay. Ive used the 2 fireplace flues but the stove has only been used for about 3 weeks.

    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]
     
  14. ArsenalDon

    ArsenalDon
    Minister of Fire 2.
    NULL
    

    Dec 16, 2012
    752
    192
    Loc:
    Meadow Valley, CA
    As far as the flue, as Jags said...if it works for you and you are comfortable with the safety level then burn on. As for temps, what is your stove top temp when flue temp was up there?
     
  15. CHeath

    CHeath
    Member 2.
    NULL
    

    Feb 18, 2013
    210
    54
    Loc:
    Northwest NorthCarolina Mtns
    well, the top rarely gets over 100-130 BUT its a furnace stove not free standing so it has the cover over the actual stove.I swear, my dad has a clay flue and a similiar type furnace ducted into his existing vents and he revs his to the moon! Id say 800 easy. I just cant do that.
     
  16. Bocefus78

    Bocefus78
    Minister of Fire 2.
    NULL
    

    Jul 27, 2010
    538
    173
    Loc:
    Just Outside Indy
    What they are saying is that without a 6" Stainless steel liner, your 6" pipe was "slammed" into a square opening....thus allowing air gaps and affecting draft negatively. It's not a waste of money. In fact, not using one is probably wasting wood. If I can guess from your picture, your stove is installed in the one (smallest one) on the left and is already showing signs of creosote buildup. Search the forums for "slammer" and read up. I'd also start looking for a chimney brush. Looks like you are gonna need it sooner rather than later.

    BTW, hotter is cleaner (within reason) and yours looks dirty. Go take a pic of dads and compare the 2. Just sayin'
     
  17. Waulie

    Waulie
    Minister of Fire 2.
    NULL
    

    Aug 31, 2011
    1,011
    272
    Loc:
    Nothern Lower Michigan
    You should be within range on that pipe. However, the "burn it hot once a month" thing can be dangerous. It can help keep your pipe clean by burning up whatever is in there. If you have enough build up in there, setting it ablaze is not a good idea. I recall you are burning wet wood so you should really be inspecting your pipe to see how much buildup you're getting rather than blindly torching whatever might be in there.

    If you have good draft and your clay is sound, I agree a liner is not a top priorty. Your flue is not that large (looks like 7X7). Keep working on getting ahead on that wood. ;)
     
  18. CHeath

    CHeath
    Member 2.
    NULL
    

    Feb 18, 2013
    210
    54
    Loc:
    Northwest NorthCarolina Mtns

    Seems like that's the hardest thing is getting ahead on that good wood! Thanks everyone.
     
  19. oldspark

    oldspark
    Guest 2.
    NULL
    

    Not sure where the once a month statement came from, I always heard once a day.
     
    PapaDave likes this.
  20. Backwoods Savage

    Backwoods Savage
    Minister of Fire 2.
    NULL
    

    Feb 14, 2007
    27,815
    7,368
    Loc:
    Michigan
    Sorry but I've always thought it to be pure baloney to burn hot to clean a chimney. We do not do that and never have nor will we. If you are burning in such a way that you need to burn a hot fire to "clean" things, you are not burning right and/or you have really poor fuel.
     
    pen likes this.
  21. CHeath

    CHeath
    Member 2.
    NULL
    

    Feb 18, 2013
    210
    54
    Loc:
    Northwest NorthCarolina Mtns
    Who said I was burning hot to clean my chimney?????????????? lol

    .
     
  22. save$

    save$
    Minister of Fire 2.
    NULL
    

    Sep 22, 2008
    1,904
    365
    Loc:
    Chelsea Maine
    When I had a wood stove, I had a tee clean out at ceiling level above the stove . I could take the cap off and run a clean out brush right to the top, never having to go up on the roof. The chimney is metalbestos. Never had a chimney fire with that setup. Cleaned it out about 3-4 times a year. Never had any runny stuff, just soot and flakes.
     
  23. red oak

    red oak
    Minister of Fire 2.
    NULL
    

    Sep 7, 2011
    1,253
    767
    Loc:
    northwest Virginia
    That is the truth! Are you in a position to cut your own or are you buying?
     
  24. CHeath

    CHeath
    Member 2.
    NULL
    

    Feb 18, 2013
    210
    54
    Loc:
    Northwest NorthCarolina Mtns
    I just can't imagine paying someone for something that's so plentiful. My dad has tons but its mostly all green or damp. I have enough to stack for next winter. It won't be a recommended 3 year seasoned dry time but it will be better than this year !!!
     
  25. red oak

    red oak
    Minister of Fire 2.
    NULL
    

    Sep 7, 2011
    1,253
    767
    Loc:
    northwest Virginia
    Yes - if you can get the wood split and stacked soon it will be much better for next winter. I started off cutting in the middle of winter and throwing it right in the fire. Each year I cut some extra until I got several years ahead. Once you're burning wood that's been split and stacked for a couple of years most of your problems will disappear. Lots of work but worth it!
     
    CHeath likes this.

Share This Page