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So, you don't think it can happen to you?

Post in 'The Wood Shed' started by LLigetfa, Jun 15, 2009.

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  1. Slow1

    Slow1 Minister of Fire

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    I wonder if that data is for injuries caused by chainsaws only (i.e. cuts/strikes of the saw) or all injuries reported while using a saw (i.e. limbs or whatever falling on the user while cutting). If the data includes things falling onto the users then I'm not overly surprised by the number of head injuries as I expect effective helmet use is probably less than it should be.

    Then again - I bet eye injuries are also considered head injuries and perhaps there are far more cases of things being thrown into eyes resulting in OSHA reports than we realize (not to mention bits of chips/dust falling from cutting above eye level and falling into eyes).

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  2. burntime

    burntime New Member

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    Well I got my arm and wrist. I statistically hit the high point. Thankfully it just needed a few stitches. Hopefully if anyone has the misfortune that it be slight and quick healing, and you don't lead with your face!
  3. DaveBP

    DaveBP Minister of Fire

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    At least some of those head injuries are from people bucking log length wood stacked up in piles. One kickback with the saw already up face high in arms tired from cutting all day and you'll wish you had a kevlar helmet on. One of the local choppers here gashed almost half his bar into his chest, cut a couple ribs and bled like the dickens but was back to work a few weeks later. Did it again a few years later. Friend of his said he didn't like chain brakes and just disabled them. Deathwish, I guess.
  4. smokinj

    smokinj Minister of Fire

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    I had one a inch from my chest falling over backwards and yes the brake kick in just like it should made a beleaver out of me!
  5. BrotherBart

    BrotherBart Hearth.com LLC Mid-Atlantic Division Staff Member

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    I don't need to watch the video. I still remember quite well what the bone in my left leg looked like out in the woods in 1988. As to helmets, I wear one now but don't think it is going to slow down a oak "widow maker" coming down from 70 feet. Or a saw chain for that matter.

    Reminds me of when they were building one of the missile silos outside of our little Texas town in the 1960s. Our neighbor was working on it and fell 130 feet to the ground and landed on his head. Seriously dead. When the inspector came to investigate he wrote up that the guy didn't have on a hardhat. Hell, his whole body would have been compressed into a hardhat. :roll:
  6. LLigetfa

    LLigetfa Minister of Fire

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    I had a saw kick back on me and the bar stopped about an inch shy of my nose. It was quicker than I had time to even think about was was happening. The chain brake didn't stop the chain as I lacked the instinct to bend my wrist toward the chain brake so it failed to trip.

    I suggest you test the hypothesis of how the brake will trip by swinging the saw with a guard over the bar through the motion that a kickback would cause. I did several times, and came to the realization that you have to hold your wrist in an unnatural position to trip the brake.
  7. BrotherBart

    BrotherBart Hearth.com LLC Mid-Atlantic Division Staff Member

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    Yeah I had that happen. A couple of times over the years. That is why my boots are now the Matterhorn Coal Miner's Boots because they have a steel metatarsal shield on top of the foot in addition to the steel toe cup.

    They cost a car payment but so what?

    I have heard loggers years ago say they wouldn't wear steel toe boots because when that sucker gets crushed into your toes you are done for.
  8. wldm09

    wldm09 New Member

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    I got a set of these for $40 - http://www.mcmaster.com/#metatarsal-guards/=2c2tye

    I believe you can work faster if you have the proper PPE.


  9. Brian VT

    Brian VT Minister of Fire

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  10. Tfin

    Tfin New Member

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    Ditto that!

    I'll be ordering a set of those toe/foot guards.
  11. wldm09

    wldm09 New Member

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    The rubber fasterner works pretty good. You run it up through the laces.
  12. stee6043

    stee6043 Minister of Fire

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    +10. I'm fully geared up now (helmet system, chaps, decent boots, etc and so on) but I sure wasn't when I started. My progression was this - buy the saw first. Go out and cut a few cord, learn a little, go slow. I did so using standard ear plugs, safety glasses and gloves. Jeans and a t-shirt all day long. Next step was to save up for a helmet system. Got it. Love it. Makes life so much easier and quieter! The last step for me was to buy chaps. Got them, they are hot, but I enjoy bouncing through the brush like nothing.

    For me I certainly cut much more cautiously and slowly when I was just starting out. In my humble opinion a lot of mistakes are made when you get more comfortable (read - faster) and more lax about what you're doing. So as I learned more and become more comfortable with the saw it seemed smart to start investing in all of the gear. I'm sure some folks won't agree with this. But honestly I didn't have another $200 to spend on gear when I bought my saw. I won't go into the woods without all my gear now but I also wouldn't tell someone who has never cut wood before to buy everything up front. I think it's rather a personal choice on how to ease into this hobby/lifestyle.
  13. CTZR1

    CTZR1 New Member

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    I agree. Better safe than sorry
    Wear the PPE
  14. Jamess67

    Jamess67 Feeling the Heat

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    Now that we have covered chainsaw accidents. Does anyone wear their chaps while splitting with an axe? I was splitting some small stuff for the firepit the other day and the axe fell wrong and grazed my shin. No damage done but I wonder if there are shin protectors out there much like the foot guards at McMaster Carr?
  15. LLigetfa

    LLigetfa Minister of Fire

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    Same link, same page, scroll down.
  16. Jamess67

    Jamess67 Feeling the Heat

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    Can you post pictures of how these attach to your boot. What keeps the toe area from flopping up and down or catching on logs and getting pulled up?
  17. Jamess67

    Jamess67 Feeling the Heat

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    I saw those, I was thinking something that was more impact than cut resistant. The ones on the page are Kevlar, I was thinking hard plastic or metal of some sort.
  18. Tfin

    Tfin New Member

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    My Grandfather used to wear a set of baseball catcher's shin guards. Worked slick.
  19. Flatbedford

    Flatbedford Minister of Fire

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    I was cutting some trees at my neighbor's house over the weekend. He laughed at me when I showed up with my chaps and helmet on. I told him that it would be tough for me to go to work on Monday with one less leg. I've owned my chaps for about 12 years now. I wear them and the helmet most of the time. I don't always put them on when I'm only making a couple cuts, but if I'm going to be working for more than a few minutes, I suit up. I also wear these boots. http://www.chippewaboots.com/boots/detail.asp?sDiv=04&sGender=4&sType=129&sSubType=196&id=25410
    The best thing about the helmet is the ear protection.
  20. runningmike

    runningmike New Member

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    Not too many loggers living in Westchester! They just won't get it. Up here in Warren county, everyone knows someone or is related to someone who has had a logging accident. Maybe not 'Safety First' (finding work is 'Job No. 1'), but everyone understands the danger.
  21. Justburnit

    Justburnit New Member

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    I am a bit late to this thread, it has turned into a good thread about protective wear.
    On the sad side, locally here in VT we lost a great man a few years back. A local farmer, a very able, intelligent and skilled man in his mid 60s. Suffered a chain injury. He had an infection set in and passed away shortly after being released from the Rutland Hospital.
    The protective gear and trying to not let overconfidence set in have a strong value that we all need to live by. I say this with not currently owning enough proper gear. That needs to be addressed.
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