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Splitter Recomendation - Huskee/Speeco

Post in 'The Gear' started by fabsroman, Dec 10, 2012.

  1. Gasifier

    Gasifier Minister of Fire

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    I hear you on that MM. But you have to admit it is fast. Very fast. With action both ways, and cutting the wood down to that nice size through those boxes, it leaves you with a pile of nice size wood fast. You could just throw the uglies off to the side. Would work nice for someone who splits a lot of wood and generally is splitting straight wood. And is still cheaper than a nice wood processor. Much too expensive for most wood burners though. You would have to be selling some serious wood each year to puchase something like that.

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  2. mywaynow

    mywaynow Minister of Fire

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    Just what we need, a finicky and expensive splitter. Warranty void if wood is put through it?? That's funny. 11500 would buy 75 cords of split wood, and no work involved.
  3. Jags

    Jags Moderate Moderator Staff Member

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    Box wedge design will also create more splitter trash. It is just the nature of the design. You don't get to adjust where it splits.
    TreePointer likes this.
  4. MasterMech

    MasterMech Guest

    They list it as being ideal for folks in the "bundlewood" business and we all know what the profit margin is there. Lowes is currently selling "bundlewood" for about $850 a cord _g. Wouldn't take too long to pay for a $12,000 splitter with that price plan.
  5. fabsroman

    fabsroman Minister of Fire

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    Yeah, but I doubt Lowes is paying $850 per cord for what they are selling. If I had a reliable source of wood, I would think about doing this as a side job if I could make $5,000 a year. Thing is, tough enough being an attorney/CPA right now with my own practice and three kids to find time for a second job. Then I think, I might as well just bill another hour instead of working an entire day splitting wood to make the same amount. Then I think, well there are months where I am not terribly busy with work. Hmmmmmm,

    And regarding the disclaimer on that splitter, I don't like it. So, I probably would not buy it. I was also watching the video and thinking about all the kindling that it was making and how some stuff I split would be a disaster going through that thing.
  6. fabsroman

    fabsroman Minister of Fire

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    Researching all these splitters, I am wondering why more companies do not offer a hydraulic log lift, or even manual log lift, option on their horizontal splitters. That is an option I would love to have. Tough for me to use a horizontal splitter with 100+ pound rounds and using a sledge and wedge defeats the purpose of having a splitter.

    I like the horizontal splitters because it means I do not have to be on my knees or sitting on a "milk crate". I prefer to work standing up. The only reason I would go with a vertical splitter is because lifting the big rounds onto the splitter would be extremely tough and I envision me doing this solo in the future. Want to buy a splitter that I can use for 30 years, meaning I will be in my 60's.
  7. Jags

    Jags Moderate Moderator Staff Member

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    Some of us just add our own log lift.;)
  8. TreePointer

    TreePointer Minister of Fire

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    I always thought that it was market driven. Most splitters I see at big box stores are under $2K. Adding another hydraulic loop for a lift moves it well above $2K. Those who would like a lift do have options (Timberwolf, I&O, American CLS, and a bunch of smaler fab shops), but they're priced above what the MTD and Huskee target customers are willing to pay.
  9. fabsroman

    fabsroman Minister of Fire

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    Yep, just watched a video on a 30 ton, green, home made splitter with log lift and hydraulic 4 way wedge. About to learn how to build a splitter. Took a year to figure out how to install the furnace myself so I could save several thousands of dollars on the install, so might as well learn all about hydraulics and welding now. Have always wanted to learn how to weld, so this is a really good excuse. Don't have an immediate need for a new splitter, so this might be a good project for after tax season now that the furnace and A/C have been installed. In the past year, I have learned more about car brake lines, car A/C, and residential HVAC than I ever thought I would. Might as well do the same for welding and hydraulics. That way, I can learn something and get the exact splitter that I want. It will be a fun project. Now I am excited.
  10. fabsroman

    fabsroman Minister of Fire

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    Yeah, my back and my brain are both voting for the log lift. Don't want to be crying about backaches when I am 70+. Have enough back issues just from shooting a lot.
  11. basod

    basod Minister of Fire

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    I had to go look
    $12,900:eek: Sweet machine though, needs longer/adjustable chutes and then you need two pickups, or I guess park the trailer under one side.
    http://www.tempestwoodsplitter.com/Wood_splitters.html
  12. basod

    basod Minister of Fire

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    You can always go log roller/ramp

    Attached Files:

  13. Sean McGillicuddy

    Sean McGillicuddy Burning Hunk

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    We have seen what can be done!!
    [​IMG][​IMG]

    [​IMG]


    Of course we would want pics!!
    Good luck!
    See this post for inspiration!

    http://www.hearth.com/talk/threads/...-dirty-work-horses-you-call-a-splitter.93206/

    Sean
  14. Jags

    Jags Moderate Moderator Staff Member

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    Non- hydro version:
    005sm.jpg
  15. amateur cutter

    amateur cutter Minister of Fire

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    I like the horizontal splitters because it means I do not have to be on my knees or sitting on a "milk crate". I prefer to work standing up.

    Not trying to be an a$$ here, but on the horizontal splitters I've used, I still had to work bent over to some degree. My back does not like a long day of that. I too prefer to work on my feet, but I like the vertical option much better when splitting. I can sit or kneel with my back fairly straight & it seems to work better for me. If you end up building a splitter, please make a thread here so we can watch. A C
  16. MasterMech

    MasterMech Guest

    Just take a look at the splitter threads on this site. We have an enthusiastic wood-burning population here of which the majority of are unwilling to spend more than $1000-$1400 on a splitter. If they even are in the market for a powered splitter.

    Well this thread has taken quite the swing. ;lol Pics or you know.... ;)
  17. fabsroman

    fabsroman Minister of Fire

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    Yep, that is what happens when I see something I like that is freaking ridiculously expensive, or when a repair is ridiculously expensive. Surely wasn't going to pay somebody $3,000 plus to install the furnace, so had to learn how to do that. They wanted $2,100 just to hook the thing up to the ductwork and another $800 for the chimney install, with me putting the furnace in place. Installing the AC was another complete disaster. They wanted $4,600 for it and I bought what they wanted to sell me for $1,900.

    Same goes for the AC clutch and brake lines on the car. If I wasn't able to make those repairs, it would have been time for a new car.

    Building a splitter is also a good excuse to get a welder, even though I already had an excuse in mind, building a trailer. I am going to be a welding fool.

    Mind you, this endeavour is not going to happen until after tax season. Do not have the time to get into this now and I need to learn how to weld and get an idea for what I am going to build. Strike that, I have an idea, but the devil is in the details. Always is. So, I need to read up on welding and welders, buy a welder, practice welding, while reading up on splitters, required parts, possible designs, etc. Ain't coming together tomorrow. However, it will come together.

    Going to have to post pics of the furnace one day.
  18. MasterMech

    MasterMech Guest

    Big MIG. Easy to learn, very productive and produces pretty welds once you get the hang of it. Set one up with fluxcore wire if you have to work outside in the wind. Equipment cost is the only disadvantage over stick. Lots of good used machines out there too. Stick is tougher to learn, and technique is everything when it comes to getting the strength and appearance you want. Plus you need a damned encyclopedia to keep track of what rod will perform best for the job you want to do. :rolleyes:

    The nice thing about building a splitter will be welding the heavy steel parts together. Welding thicker metal slows the process down so a beginner can more easily see whats happening IMO. I started welding mower decks and tubing, mosty short welds on 16 ga or thinner metals. It was over before I realized what I was looking at. ;lol
    Jags likes this.
  19. Jags

    Jags Moderate Moderator Staff Member

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    If you are going to use a mig to build a splitter, it will need to be a pretty big one. The smaller migs will NOT penetrate deep enough when you start to weld the thick stuff. Food for thought.

    You can find old Lincoln Tombstone stick welders all over the place for a hunert bucks. More food for thought. (but I really want a mig for my shop.;lol)
    basod likes this.
  20. basod

    basod Minister of Fire

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    I'd second Jags.
    Get an old tombstone stick welder, don't get overwhelmed by the stick numbers - 6011 root pass, 7018 filler, should satisfy anything you'd be doing for a splitter.

    Now you have a christmas list for the wife:
    Welding hood
    Slag hammer
    Angle grinder
    Disks
    Wire wheels
  21. fabsroman

    fabsroman Minister of Fire

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    My dad has an old stick welder and has welded plenty with it. We welded together the fish tank stand for my 75 gallon and 55 gallon combo with it 20 some years ago. So, I have access to a stick welder if I need it. Like the MTD splitter, it is a 30 minute drive away. As far as not worrying about what stick to use, I am pretty sure my dad never worried about that. He just isn't that particular about things. Me, I'll be worrying about it even after the weld comes out just fine.

    Will probably end up getting a MIG just to have the thing and am thinking about getting a plasma cutter too. What size Lincoln MIG do you guys think I will need? Granted, I will end up doing more research to confirm any recommendation, but recommendations are a great place to start. Had dreams last night about how to design this splitter. lol

    Wrote about this in another thread somewhere where a guy got a chainsaw for a Xmas present. Does not work like that in my household. I buy my tools, hunting, fishing, shooting, and cycling gear because I am very particular about them. My wife never questions the tool purchases. Now, hunting, fishing, shooting, and cycling stuff, that is a different story. Have to get the approval with the large ticket items in those categories but that usually is never an issue either.

    First thing I need to start with is a book on welding. Anybody have any recommendations for a good read about welding?
  22. Jags

    Jags Moderate Moderator Staff Member

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  23. TreePointer

    TreePointer Minister of Fire

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    I just picked up a secondhand Lincon 225 AC/DC stick welder with wheel kit and some other extras for $175. If you're not familiar with welders, it's a version of the "tombstone" mentioned above, but it has DC welding capability which makes for smoother welds.

    This welder will be for tractor implements and general farm welding. I have no plans to build a splitter, but a new welder may mean new projects...just because!

    As for which MIG to get, stay with Lincoln, Miller, or Hobart (a Miller company) and you should be fine. Factors such as input voltage (115V or 230V or both), duty cycle, shielding gas ready, output amp settings, and thickness of metal to be welded will factor into your decision.

    Welder's Handbook by Richard Finch is a nice introduction.
  24. Jags

    Jags Moderate Moderator Staff Member

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    There ain't a 115V mig that I am aware of that will have the proper penetration power for heavy steel. Remember that the push plate and wedge is gonna be thick stuff.
    TreePointer likes this.
  25. MasterMech

    MasterMech Guest

    I was thinking Miller 252 or similar. The 252 is on my short list (but I really like the 120V/240V capability of the 211 so .... I'm torn, ;lol). I like the 252 because it's reasonably affordable for it's capability (1/2" Mild Steel, single pass) at about $2200 or so and I have experience with the one at work. I'm sure Lincoln builds equivalent machines as well, I'm just not as familiar with them.

    Miller's website has a monster how-to section for MIG, TIG, and Stick welding. Very good info there.

    http://www.millerwelds.com

    Even if you have a stick welder, I'd still want a little MIG for doing light stuff. The 120V machines (like the Millermatic 140 or Hobart Handler 140) are very useful for automotive body-work and light fabrication.

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