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Splitter Safety Question

Post in 'The Gear' started by JV_Thimble, Oct 21, 2013.

  1. JV_Thimble

    JV_Thimble Feeling the Heat

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    Just got an Oregon 28 ton H/V splitter. In looking through the manual, many of the safety tips are quite obvious to even stupid. Keep your work area clear, close the gas cap, split logs in the direction intended, etc. But I don't follow one of them:

    Always disconnect the splitter from the towing vehicle.

    So, I ask, why? If there is a reason, perhaps I should consider changing what I'm doing.

    Thanks in advance,
    John

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  2. wolfonahill

    wolfonahill New Member

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    Sometimes I split with the splitter connected as well. It's probably cautioned against for the safety of the vehicle somehow but i too am curious...
  3. Gunny

    Gunny Member

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    2 reasons is my guess. (May be wrong) 1) For the smart guy who's splitter backs over him because he did not put the vehicle in park. LIABILITY OFF OREGON. 2) Stable ground to split on the way the manufacture intended it to be used. LIABILITY. I have split with friends many times with the splitter hooked-up. Got a lot done too! Short toss to the back of the truck bed!
    JV_Thimble likes this.
  4. JV_Thimble

    JV_Thimble Feeling the Heat

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    I'm thinking liability is the reason as well. I had one odd shaped piece that, in vertical mode, didn't stay seated on the base plate. Slipped off and splitter went up. Simple matter (if you're all properly hooked up), to back off, reposition, or realize maybe that odd piece isn't going to be split. But, if you're not hooked up right, on uneven ground, etc. there will be (stupid) problems.
  5. Gunny

    Gunny Member

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    Hey JV, how do you like that Oregon splitter. Just wondering, I debated on getting one of those when I ordered by I&O. Just limited info on them and I was not a member of this forum.
  6. JV_Thimble

    JV_Thimble Feeling the Heat

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    So far, so good. I have rented an I&O before, and, IIRC, when you're in vertical mode there is a pin to lock it in place. Not so with the Oregon. I got it in part for the faster cycle time (12 seconds) and the larger wheels (12"). I figured the larger wheels would give you more stability and allow you to safely drive over 45 MPH. Turns out they still recommend a max of 45 MPH.
  7. TreePointer

    TreePointer Minister of Fire

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    Lots of reasons, some already mentioned:

    Vehicle may not be parked properly.
    Splitter not properly secured to tow hitch.
    Splitter not properly supported on tow hitch (splitter's support leg is less mobile than vehicle suspension system).
    Wayward split may damage vehicle.
    Less room to maneuver around splitter when hooked to tow hitch.
    Fire from splitter operation or during refueling (more likely) may also damage vehicle.

    Potential fire is the main reason I don't like to operate my splitter while attached to towing vehicle.

    For the record, my Huskee manual also doesn't specify WHY it's important not to operate splitter while attached to towing vehicle.
  8. firefighterjake

    firefighterjake Minister of Fire

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    Don't forget the all important safety rule found on page 16, paragraph 6, sub-section 9: Do not at any time attempt to sit on the splitter beam and engage the ram. ;)
  9. bioman

    bioman Burning Hunk

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    Vertical log splitters are hazardous. Always be careful.
  10. Backwoods Savage

    Backwoods Savage Minister of Fire

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    Plain and simple for all those safety cautions. It is the sewers, whoops, suers that cause all companies to put stupid warnings on their equipment. Ours also says to place the log on the splitter then walk around behind the wheel before pushing the lever down. Of course they don't mention that you may have to do this several times because the log tips over....

    Simple plan: Do it how it works best and forget all the dumb warnings.
    Butcher, Joful and NW Walker like this.
  11. gzecc

    gzecc Minister of Fire

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    With the flimsy front legs I see on even quality built splitters I assumed a lot were used while connected to a vehicle of some sort, just for stability.
    JV_Thimble likes this.
  12. Beer Belly

    Beer Belly Minister of Fire

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    What would happen if you have an accident, or some sort of emergency and gotta go now.....do you want to be draggin' the splitter down the road
    Joful likes this.
  13. Joful

    Joful Minister of Fire

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    ;lol

    Sure would make esplainin' the situation a little easier, when you get to the ER. Just point toward the parking lot with your good arm/hand.
    NickDL, Fifelaker and Beer Belly like this.
  14. Backwoods Savage

    Backwoods Savage Minister of Fire

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    We have never left our splitter connected to a vehicle. No stability problem ever. It also can be moved easily by hand rather than using gas to make a move.

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