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stihl 025 chain stretched

Post in 'The Gear' started by Jaamz, Mar 8, 2007.

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  1. Jaamz

    Jaamz New Member

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    I have been using my 025 since about 6 years now. I mostly use it for cutting downed trees, limbs, and logs for my firewood. I've carefully maintained it to the best of my ability. It is in sound working order overall, but the chain adjuster is maxed now, so I cannot adjust the slop out any longer. Do I buy a new chain, or do I take a link out to shorten the chain? I tried to find a diy article on this and all I found was someone's diy press for removing links. I really don't want to invest in a press for maintaining one saw. Do I need a press, or can I take it out with a punch and a hammer?

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  2. Hogwildz

    Hogwildz Minister of Fire

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    Chains are cheap, buy a couple new ones. I think its safe to say you got your life out of that one.
  3. Roospike

    Roospike New Member

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    Yeppers , chains are cheap , buy a few new chains and make sure to check your bar and sprocket for damage and use. Cost me nothing to have a link taken out at a dealer when i bought a few new chains and had the bad rails smoothed and straightened.
  4. EatenByLimestone

    EatenByLimestone Minister of Fire

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    On this topic, when picking up some new chains, is it worthwhile to go for chains with a more agressive cut?

    Matt
  5. carpniels

    carpniels Minister of Fire

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    Hi Lime,

    NOrmally the chain for your saw is the chain for your saw. I don't know if you can choose a more agressive chain depending on your saw. Homeowner models are built and have bars for safety chains. Semi pro and pro saws have bars and drive sprockets for more agressive chain.

    But sure, if it turns out you have a choice and you are comfortable and experienced enough to use and control a saw with a more agressive chain, go for it. It does make a large difference.

    carpniels
  6. Corey

    Corey Minister of Fire

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    I have seen 'safety' chains or 'low kickback' varieties - aimed at the weekend handyman, or people that don't really know what they are doing and may only cut a few limbs a year. These chains have a higher raker and cut slower (got one by mistake). You can always file the rakers deeper, but you might as well start with a 'normal' chain.

    Corey
  7. babalu87

    babalu87 New Member

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    Yup, buy a new chain. Have that one bronzed and put it on the mantle
  8. DriftWood

    DriftWood Minister of Fire

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    Six years on one chain, you are doing good. The stretch is really wear in the link bearings. Look at them to see how much metal is left till they brake. Look at the cutters, how much is left to sharpen. When I can not sharpen a chain, that is the main reason, I get out a new chain and a new drive sprocket. I will take my chain to a local small engine shop if my bike chain tool wont push out a link pin to take out a link on a long chain. A punch, a hammer and a vice set a little open for the pin to slide down has worked for me also.
  9. Harley

    Harley Minister of Fire

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    Generally, my chains are done with their sharpening life before they get that far stretched. Just for safety's sake and the price of a new chain.... replace it. Even if there's enough meat left on the blade to sharpen.... I'd think there's been enough wear on the chain to let it retire.
  10. Eric Johnson

    Eric Johnson Mod Emeritus

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    A new chain should cost $10-$15. Not worth fooling with one that's worn out, which is what that one is.
  11. Jaamz

    Jaamz New Member

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    Thank you all for your responses. I think the chain has lived this long, because we moved in 2005 and getting the stoves up and running was secondary to rest my home's on going projects. It has hardly been used for the last two years. Really it has 4 years of medium duty. The stihl dealer recommended non-safety chain.
  12. Sandor

    Sandor Minister of Fire

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    I use a Stihl 025 and I have never maxed out the chain adjustment before the teeth were all gone.

    Is this the original Stihl chain? How often to you sharpen it? What is your adjustment method?

    A replacement Stihl chain is not 10 bucks!
  13. Eric Johnson

    Eric Johnson Mod Emeritus

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  14. Sandor

    Sandor Minister of Fire

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    Eric, what I was saying is that a Stihl brand chain is not ten bucks, like closer to 30.

    Certainly you can run an Oregon. I just ordered a couple of Woodsman Pro chains for my Stihl, along with an Oregon Bar and Oregon sprocket.

    I was going to do a comparison between the Stihl chain and Woodsman Pro chains once I get some more run time.

    Off the bat, I can say that the Woodsman Pro chain is WAY softer steel than the Stihl, and does not cut nearly as fast, and wears out much faster. The bright side is the Woodsman Pro chain is WAY easier to file.
  15. Eric Johnson

    Eric Johnson Mod Emeritus

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    Stihl makes good chain, no question about that.

    I usually stock up on chain at a local woodsmen's field days in August where most lengths of Oregon chain are $9.99 per chain, with no limit. It's good chain, but I'm not terribly picky at those prices. I get about ten cords per chain, so that's about $20 for a summer's cutting. Those shows are also great places to buy cases of bar & chain oil, files, safety gear--you name it. Carpniels goes to the same show. I have to get there before him or it's all gone.

    BTW, anybody in Maine or northern New England might want to consider going to the Bangor (Maine) Expo in May, which is put on by the trade association I work for. You can get similar deals there, too. Plus, admission is free if you register in advance.

    http://www.nefpexpo.net
  16. Jaamz

    Jaamz New Member

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    I took it apart and cleaned it. There's plenty of adjustment left--I'm such a newbie!
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