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Storing wood supply

Post in 'The Wood Shed' started by rgsccr, Sep 4, 2008.

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  1. rgsccr

    rgsccr New Member

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    Forgive this neophyte question but is it a problem storing seasoned (or partly seasoned) firewood out in the rain and snow? That is, does the moisture content go up when the wood gets wet? Should the wood pile be covered with a tarp? Thanks.

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  2. bluefrier

    bluefrier Feeling the Heat

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    You should be good as long as the top is covered, leave the sides uncovered so the pile could breathe and release moisture.
    Personally, to take full advantage of the summer sun I won't cover my piles until late fall.
  3. billb3

    billb3 Minister of Fire

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    You can make smoke in Seattle ?

    I like to keep a 'roof' of some sort to keep rainwater off the stacks. Or as much as possible with what I've got. (strips of plywood or whatever). I don't cover the sides, even in the Winter, unless we have one of those years with drifting slush that freezes averything together.
    Plus I use abit of eastern white pine, which can be a little bit like a sponge, and we get enough rain during the week sometimes to keep everything in a constant state of drying out.
    It's easiest for me to make a stack and throw some plywood strips on top.
    We also get enough wind that tarps have a tendency to shred , make a racket and fly away.
  4. smokinj

    smokinj Minister of Fire

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    I never cover my wood,but i can get a cord in the garage very quickly if big snow is coming.How many days supply can you rowtate in side the house?
  5. imacman

    imacman Guest

    I used to use pieces of tar paper just across the top of the piles.....plenty of airflow underneath if stacked correctly (criss-cross), and stays dryer.

    just my 2 cents.
  6. rgsccr

    rgsccr New Member

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    One more (probably silly) question. I can probably get a cord of wood in my garage if I put some of it on some loose hay I have in the back for archery targets. Any concerns - bugs, etc. - about doing this? Thanks for all the help. Rich
  7. smokinj

    smokinj Minister of Fire

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    if you can get a cord in there just wait til you know real bad weater on its way then bring it in!Then you can burn your way through the bad weather dry wood
  8. Backwoods Savage

    Backwoods Savage Minister of Fire

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    Normally, a wood pile is best left uncovered through the summer months. This is to help with evaporation. If it is covered, the moisture won't evaporate as well or as fast. Therefore, leave it uncovered usually until the fall rains or snow comes. Then cover the top only.

    Usually, wood is not like a sponge. Rain water will just roll off the wood and not soak in. After a heavy rain, our wood is dry again in less than 24 hours.

    However, in your area, it very well might pay to keep the top covered because of the constant wet conditions. Many do and get along fine. But then, others also leave theirs uncovered the year around.

    We keep our wood uncovered until late fall and then use either old steel roofing or a tarp to cover the top. Our wood also has plenty of time to season as we have about a 7 year supply all cut, split and stacked. Only last winter's cutting is still uncovered. All the rest has old steel roofing on the tops.

    Good luck.
  9. Rockey

    Rockey Minister of Fire

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    Wood will definitely reabsorb rain water. Most of which is wicked up through the ends of the firewood but some will be absorbed through the sides as well. Protect seasoned firewood from any precipitation.
  10. Backwoods Savage

    Backwoods Savage Minister of Fire

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    My wood doesn't know that, therefore, we leave it out in the rain and have no problems. It is wood, not a sponge.
  11. RedRanger

    RedRanger New Member

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    Out of the 14 cords I have accumulated-4 of those are mill-ends, or slabs. Flat wood like that is indeed a sponge. soaks up water like a sponge, and takes a long time to dry out again. So, always, always cover the slab wood, and the real wood should be stacked outside in rows with always, always the bark side up to shed water.

    If there is no bark on the wood, then cover at least the tops. Remember, that Dennis has a seven year supply, and I have a 2 and a half year supply, and most of you are going from year to year. So, for those of you going from year to year, be safe, be sensible and cover at least the tops.

    Sorry Dennis, but that is the reality for most of these folks. :)
  12. Elderthewelder

    Elderthewelder Minister of Fire

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    bring it up here to the Pacific Northwest where it rains 7 months of the year
    I keep mine in simple (crude) "bins" all year long, I have found when it rains hard and water blows in, the splits sometime get pretty wet on the ends and will sizzle in the stove, I keep about 2 day's worth in the garage but sometimes it will not be completly dry when I burn it

    I think you have to cover your wood if you live in this area, as the person started this thread does

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  13. rgsccr

    rgsccr New Member

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    Thanks for all the very useful replies. It looks like I can get a full cord or more into my garage so I'll probably do that with this first load of wood as it is all fully seasoned. Rich
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