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Stove pipe caulking?

Post in 'The Hearth Room - Wood Stoves and Fireplaces' started by RandyG, Oct 19, 2011.

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  1. RandyG

    RandyG Member

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    I installed my Fireview last spring and purchased the whole chimney package, pipe and all though woodstock and it really came together nice, but I didn't caulk every joint. Is this necessary? Everything fits together pretty tight. I did caulk the collar where the pipe come out of the stove only because there were visible gaps there. Just want to be safe, I might get to have my first fire this weekend, fingers crossed, thanks.

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  2. Todd

    Todd Minister of Fire

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    If you have a good tight fit I wouldn't worry about calking or furnace cementing the seams. I did the same as you around the stove collar because I saw gaps and I also placed cement between the seams of my adjustible stove pipe.

    I'll try and send some of this cold weather down your way if you send some of that warm air up here.
  3. Mr. Kelly

    Mr. Kelly Member

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    I mentioned in my earlier post that my interior is not caulked at all, even at the base of the pipe where it meets the stove. Not at all sure about the exterior. My guess is that it's not.

    I've never experienced any leakage. Not sure what others do....???
  4. Seasoned Oak

    Seasoned Oak Minister of Fire

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    Caulking would make it harder to take the pipes apart for cleaning and inspection. If you get smoke coming from those joints during normal operation with a warm chimney you have a draft problem or a blocked flue.
  5. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    If you want to run a bead of Rutland furnace cement around the flue collar, that would be fine. I have never caulked pipe sections.
  6. RandyG

    RandyG Member

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    I managed to get in a few small breakin fires last spring before it got too warm and never seen any smoke at all. I didn't think I had to seal every seam but just wanted to be sure.

    Oh, and Todd, its a deal on the cold air, I would gladly send you all the warm air we have, I'm over it!!! Thanks everyone.....
  7. Mr. Kelly

    Mr. Kelly Member

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    Too much of a good thing, have you?
  8. SteveKG

    SteveKG Minister of Fire

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    I have friends who've caulked their pipe connections and etc.

    In 45 years, I never have. I've had maybe a half dozen stoves and none have needed it.

    On the other hand, it won't hurt anything except being a bit of a chore when and if you need to remove or replace some of the pipe. But even then, not that much of a chore, probably.

    I just don't do it. Even at the stovetop adaptors. I don't recall ever having any leakage, even during cold start-up.
  9. Backwoods Savage

    Backwoods Savage Minister of Fire

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    I have always used furnace cement in the joints of the pipe but not on the chimney itself. That stuff is cheap and easy to put on so I see no reason to not do it. Has it kept me from any problems in the past? Don't really know but I haven't had problems so I'll no doubt continue the practice the next time any changes are made.
  10. tsc003

    tsc003 New Member

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    I've never heard of "stove pipe caulking", I think that's your answer.
  11. yooperdave

    yooperdave Minister of Fire

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    on the advice of a manufacturer's stove consumer hotline, i caulked my single wall joints. (actually, furnace cement)
    i wish i hadn't. i didn't really need it to improve the draft as this is what i was trying to achieve. over the summer months, a lot of the cement has cracked and fallen off. the bits of it remaining on the joints, are discolored.
    on the other hand, i was warned by members of this forum that i shouldn't use it and that these things would happen it time. was also told that it would definitely make it harder to remove the single wall pipe for cleaning.

    if you have tight joints to begin with, my vote is to screw the connections (3 per joint) and let it go at that. the only place to use the cement would be at the stove collar...and if you have a masonry chimney, at that joint.

    for what it's worth, i saw a guy hook up a wood burning stove to masonry chimney this past summer. the pipe was single wall. he showed me how tight the joints were. "so tight, i didn't even use screws!" he had 6 joints total and only used one screw and decided he didn't like the galvanized color of the screw contrasting against the black pipe. i told him about the extreme temp changes the pipe would be going through upon use, but was told not to worry about it. wow!
  12. fossil

    fossil Accidental Moderator Staff Member

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    If the system is properly configured and operated, then all that will happen at places in piping joints that aren't perfectly sealed is air will be drawn into the flue. The potential problem with this is that it will tend to cool the flue gases on their way to daylight, but there would have to be major leaks, I think, to make that a big problem. If you find that you have smoke or flue odors coming out of the flue piping, than you've got a draft problem. The pressure inside that flue pipe & chimney should be below atmospheric from the stove collar all the way up to the chimney cap. It's the atmospheric pressure of the intake combustion air at the stove and the heat of the flue gases that make the flue/chimney system work. Rick
  13. RandyG

    RandyG Member

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    Yes, Mr. Kelley, way too much.Been a long hot summer down here. Thanks everyone for your input, this seems to be a mixed bag topic, I think I'm going to keep as is for now and see how the stove performs this season. Like I mentioned earlier, the few break in fires I've had there's been no smoke or smell at all. Also I seem to have a very good draft. Will update to let you know, thanks again guys. Best wishes to all this burning season!!
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