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  1. sgt panties

    sgt panties New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2014
    Messages:
    10
    Loc:
    NC
    Hi, I need more advice please about my top-venting Grandpa Bear.

    There is a 1/8 gap at the back of the 8" single-wall stovepipe where it enters the stove. The end of the stove pipe is out-of-round right around the vertical seam. I think it's a design flaw of the pipe. The seam acts as
    a kind of "hinge" so I don't think pounding the pipe out from the inside would help. I tried adding tin foil or that black Rutland stove cement into the gap but it is not a lasting solution and seems that it just encourages the gap to grow wider.

    BUT, I have always have a very good draft. I never see smoke coming out, but I can smell it.

    How does the gap effect the efficiency of the stove? Should I just let it be?

    How about using a few nicely placed 1/8 steel pop-rivets to close the gap? Or is there some no-no associated with that?
    Last edited: Feb 26, 2014

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  2. CamFan

    CamFan Member

    Joined:
    Aug 21, 2011
    Messages:
    219
    Loc:
    North East Georgia
    To start off with Welcome to the forum,

    The next thing is unless it was a special order, Grandpas had 8" flues
    Are you using snap together pipe? If you are try a good brand not snap together. Metal Fab or Dura Vent brands, a stove shop in your area should carry it and it cost more but it will last 10 plus years. use a Dura vent double skirted adapter on top of the stove put the male end of the pipe in the adapter. They will sell a slip connector that you will not have to cut the pipe. This should cure your dimple at the seam.
  3. sgt panties

    sgt panties New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2014
    Messages:
    10
    Loc:
    NC
    Oops, you are right the pipe is 8". The pipe is just a simple slide fit. Can I use my old pipe with the double-skirt adapter?
  4. CamFan

    CamFan Member

    Joined:
    Aug 21, 2011
    Messages:
    219
    Loc:
    North East Georgia
    What do you mean slide fit? Yes you can use the double skirted adapter with your pipe but it may not change much if your chimney pipe is dimpled. Are you pointing the male end down? This is the correct way and it will for sure fit the adapter. part #1872.

    I hope I can suggest a product with out being in violation of the forum rules. I am not trying to sell it, I just know about it.
  5. sgt panties

    sgt panties New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2014
    Messages:
    10
    Loc:
    NC
    Crimped male end down, yes. OK I see the part at at Sears. Thanks.
    BTW, what would be wrong with using rivets? I could put my hat stretcher inside the pipe temporarily to provide a backing to drill the holes.

    You, know, I have an idea. Maybe the hat stretcher will completely solve the problem by itself. Will post later.
    Last edited: Feb 26, 2014
  6. CamFan

    CamFan Member

    Joined:
    Aug 21, 2011
    Messages:
    219
    Loc:
    North East Georgia
    most of the time people use screws. rivets have a core that can come out making another hole. I use self threading screws to attach pipe. Sears sells stove pipe? I never knew.
  7. sgt panties

    sgt panties New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2014
    Messages:
    10
    Loc:
    NC
  8. coaly

    coaly Fisher Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Dec 22, 2007
    Messages:
    1,460
    Loc:
    NE PA
    I use screws too. Just drill the collar large enough for the screw to spin, and a self tapper will pull the pipe tight to the collar eliminating the gap.
    It's not much leakage to affect efficiency as in cool air leaking in to fill the void created by rising gasses, but it does cool the flue somewhat. Not enough to notice a difference. Under normal operation, barometric air pressure is higher outside the pipe and leaks in, not out. Closing damper too much or flue restriction is when you notice the smell.
    The reason you don't want a leak there;
    I had a large leak on my Kitchen Queen that allowed so much air in, the oxygen mixed with smoke right there and ignited in the pipe. I noticed a glowing spot on the pipe just above where the joint was leaking about the size of a quarter, or I never would have noticed it.

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