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Stovepipe Fire

Post in 'The Hearth Room - Wood Stoves and Fireplaces' started by kwheat, Dec 9, 2005.

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  1. kwheat

    kwheat New Member

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    Nov 25, 2005
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    I guess I got overly enthused about stuffing my Napoleon 1100C after reading the previous thread about,
    "load'n 'em up! My stove got close to 700 degrees and was really cookin, I shut the air down and kept my fingers on 911 until it finally came down.

    Has anyone experienced a chimney fire? Any suggestions on what to do if it happens? I felt really helpless
    watching that thermo go up.

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  2. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    Good question. I have a CO2 fire extinguisher next to the stove that I hope is large enough to snuff the fire and more particularly fill the stack with CO2, but perhaps that is naive.
  3. Eric Johnson

    Eric Johnson Mod Emeritus

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    It doesn't sound to me like you had a chimney fire. When you get one of those, it usually sounds kind of like a jet plane. I've had a few over the years, and always find myself wishing I'd cleaned the chimney, like earlier. "Helpless" is a good way to put it.

    If you have a good, insulated stainless steel chimney that's installed properly, you shouldn't fear chimney fires. While you should do all you can to prevent them, Class A chimneys are designed to contain the fire and keep it from spreading, so it should ease your mind somewhat if you happen to light one off. You will want to have the chimney inspected following a fire, however, to make sure that everything is still kosher.

    If you have a tile-lined masonry chimney or plain stove pipe or are trying to use something other than a Class A chimney in good condition, then you should be sweating during a chimney fire. The next call you make after 911 should be a chimney liner guy.
  4. Corey

    Corey Minister of Fire

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    I bought a big "chimney fire extinguisher" many years ago when I first started burning. It is basically a big "road flare" looking thing with instructions to snap the end off, strike the flare and throw it into the firebox. Then you shut down all air inlets and pray. So far I haven't had to use it.

    The CO2 fire extinguisher seems like a good idea...especially no mess clean-up like a dry chemical type. Just be careful and not get it too close to the fire...last thing you want to do is blast bruning embers from the fire back into the room.

    Corey
  5. rudysmallfry

    rudysmallfry Feeling the Heat

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    Corey, where did you get that road flare style extinguisher? Can you get those at HD or Lowes? That sounds like it provides extra piece of mind.
  6. whitelight

    whitelight New Member

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    I think it was a product called "ChimFex".
    Last i heard, in a sick twist of fate, the factory that made them burnt down.
  7. BrotherBart

    BrotherBart Hearth.com LLC Mid-Atlantic Division Staff Member

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    Yep. The factory burned down and they aren't going to make the things anymore. Bummer.
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