1. Welcome Hearth.com Guests and Visitors - Please enjoy our forums!
    Hearth.com GOLD Sponsors who help bring the site content to you:
    Hearthstone Soapstone and Cast-Iron stoves( Wood, Gas or Pellet Stoves and Inserts)

Suggestions for Improvement of Existing Wood Shed

Post in 'The Wood Shed' started by runningduck, Sep 29, 2011.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. runningduck

    runningduck New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 29, 2011
    Messages:
    2
    Loc:
    Southern Maine
    I have this woodshed that was built about 7 years ago. After spending some time on this forum I realize that this shed is less then ideal. We used to put green wood in it, expecting it to dry. I know that many of you move your seasoned wood into the shed, but in this case I'd like to make this shed as conductive to drying as possible. The only opening is on the front. As you can see I put a hole in the back and was planning on adding more (with screens). Before I do more I'd like some opinions as to where to cut holes... add vents etc?

    Some thoughts I had:
    1). Add a couple of "skylights" (I have some glass and I can be pretty crafty) on the roof in order to let the sun warm the inside- helping to dry the wood.
    2. I have a few solar panels that I was going to rig to some fan(s)... where would be the optimal placement? (roof vent) (underneath) (sides) etc.
    3. I suspect the easiest and best might be to remove the rear siding and simply leave the studs- leaving it open on both sides... I am hesitant to do that as the powers that be may not find that aesthetically pleasing...

    Any thoughts or other suggestions?


    On another note- ever since I replaced an old VC Vigilant with a PE Fusion- I have a new found interest in wood burning. As a kid growing up I remember throwing whatever wood we had laying around in it. I believe my father still does that (no matter what I say, I guess people get stuck in their ways). Never did I realize how much there is to it but also how much I enjoy it. This forum has helped tremendously. And I can say I truly love my new stove and I never would have thought I would take so much pleasure in using it. :)

    Attached Files:

    Helpful Sponsor Ads!





  2. lukem

    lukem Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jan 12, 2010
    Messages:
    3,687
    Loc:
    Indiana
    That's a good looking shed, but as you said...doesn't look ideal for drying.

    Couple thoughts come to mind:

    1. Put in a ridge vent to let some air escape. That should allow cooler (dryer) air to be drawn in from the door...heat up and soak up some moisture, then exit the roof. I'm guessing the inside rafter area gets pretty hot in the summer.

    2. I agree adding a vent opposite the door would help circulation, but I wouldn't strip the siding. Maybe add a couple louvered gable type vents on that wall?

    EDIT: I doubt skylights would do much good because it looks pretty shady, but that might just be the pictures.

    EDIT AGAIN: Can you use the existing siding on the back and louver it? Best of both worlds!
  3. daveswoodhauler

    daveswoodhauler Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    May 20, 2008
    Messages:
    1,847
    Loc:
    Massachusetts
    I think you have a few options:

    1.) You can keep the shed as is, and find a place to season your wood outside and let the sun and wind do its work.
    2.) You could open up the sides and rear of the shed, and make it more like a carport structure.

    On another note, it looks like a lot of the wood in the shed is small/unsplit rounds, so I think those would take even longer to season. If it were me, I would keep the shed as is and find a place in the sun/wind to season....then you can move that wood to the shed before the snow starts comin down.
  4. firefighterjake

    firefighterjake Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2008
    Messages:
    15,665
    Loc:
    Unity/Bangor, Maine
    You could always do what I did on my shed that I built . . . I went with a conventional 2 x 4 wall due to the fact I had a lot of free lumber . . . but to make it look more appealing and still retain the usefulness as a woodshed I went with a vertical-running (I would have made Backwoods Savage proud) rustic board and batting minus the batting . . . it looks pretty good and allows air to circulate pretty well.
  5. firefighterjake

    firefighterjake Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2008
    Messages:
    15,665
    Loc:
    Unity/Bangor, Maine
    On the flip side . . . that's a really nice shed . . . maybe do as Daveswoodhauler suggested . . . season it outside and then move it under cover after a year or so.
  6. bogydave

    bogydave Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Dec 4, 2009
    Messages:
    8,426
    Loc:
    So Cent ALASKA
    You have a real nice well built wood shed.
    Why not just season the wood outside & use the shed to put the seasoned wood in for the coming burn season?
    Venting will help, but even outside wood stacked tight takes longer to season in the center of the stack.
    Some vents will help but using it for storing already dry wood might be more efficient.
    Also Some holes in the floor may help create an updraft that moves air up thru the center of the stacks.
  7. Backwoods Savage

    Backwoods Savage Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Feb 14, 2007
    Messages:
    27,815
    Loc:
    Michigan
    One of the ideal wood sheds you would want if putting green wood into it would look a bit like the old style corn cribs. That is, slats on the sides with about 3" gaps between the boards on all 3 sides that are not now open. It's all about air circulation.

    We too dry our wood outside and then move it into the shed.
  8. Sisu

    Sisu Feeling the Heat

    Joined:
    Sep 28, 2009
    Messages:
    466
    Loc:
    Ontario
    Speed holes.
  9. Joe in MI

    Joe in MI Member

    Joined:
    Apr 24, 2010
    Messages:
    60
    Loc:
    NW Michigan
    My first choice would be to season outside and then move it inside, like the others said. If that's not an option, though, what if you replaced one or more of the walls with heavy-duty lattice panels? I stained some and put it around the bottom of my deck to keep the dog out from under it - looks really nice, I think. You could stain or paint it to match the shed. I went with the heavy-duty because it looks a lot better than the cheap stuff - and it's actually pretty strong.

    That's my 2 cents.
  10. PapaDave

    PapaDave Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Feb 23, 2008
    Messages:
    5,740
    Loc:
    Northern MI - in the mitten
    runningduck, that's a very nice shed, but not practical for storing wood that isn't dry.
    I'm one of those (as of last year) who puts the wood in the shed AFTER it's had a chance to dry in the sun and wind. It's a yearly rotation thing, now that I'm more than a couple years ahead.
    Like Jake, my shed siding is vertical with about 1/4" to 1/2" spacing between the boards.
    I put my fingers up next to those openings and felt air flowing through, front to back and side to side.....it's 16'x10'.
    As to your shed, if not too much trouble, take off the corner trim and siding, then reinstall with gaps. It helps. Oh, and split some of that stuff. It'll dry quicker.
    If only I knew then what I know now........... :coolsmile:
  11. bpm44

    bpm44 Member

    Joined:
    Jul 16, 2009
    Messages:
    180
    Loc:
    WNY
    That is a great looking shed. Would it be possible to remove every other board from the backside? Would the powers frown on that? If so them I think a second shed is in order. One for drying, one for seasoned stuff ready to burn.
  12. gzecc

    gzecc Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Sep 24, 2008
    Messages:
    4,033
    Loc:
    NNJ
    I would probably get some free windows on CL and install on each side.
    I would probably also use my circular saw and cut out every third clapboard on the back.
    I would probably also install a ridge vent.
  13. tickbitty

    tickbitty Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Feb 21, 2008
    Messages:
    1,539
    Loc:
    VA
    That's what I would say, it's a shame to cut up that nice shed!
  14. Stegman

    Stegman Feeling the Heat

    Joined:
    Jan 4, 2011
    Messages:
    317
    Loc:
    Sterling, MA
    Agree. That shed is tasty. I wish I had something that looked like that. I'd get some pallets and season outside before I'd modify that shed too much.
  15. cptoneleg

    cptoneleg Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jul 17, 2010
    Messages:
    1,466
    Loc:
    Virginia
    Even in this shed with all the circulation it can get, wood takes about twice as long to season as it does outside single rows, sun and wind, so as others have advised don't ruin a good shed.
    I have filled this shed with all the dry wood I need for this season, to keep it out of the snow and rain :zip:

    Attached Files:

  16. tfdchief

    tfdchief Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Nov 24, 2009
    Messages:
    3,332
    Loc:
    Tuscola, IL
    Yep, to nice a shed to chop holes in.
  17. runningduck

    runningduck New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 29, 2011
    Messages:
    2
    Loc:
    Southern Maine
    Thanks for the comments on the shed! I never realized it's "that nice", looking at it now though... yes it is! I guess it would be a shame to cut it up to much. But with lattice it might be able to be done tastefully. I have a number of spare windows from a remodel. My first idea was to turn it into something of a 'hotbox' if you will. Circulation would be from fan's (in the eves) and perhaps elsewhere.

    Perhaps I am getting carried away with this. I know; move it outside and replace it with seasoned wood. I just really hate handling wood more then twice (cut spit stack- then burn in a year) but maybe I am just lazy.

    Since I already purchased some solar panels and a DC greenhouse fan... where would you out it? Thought the roof... underneath... ? I'll try not to muck with it too much... but since I already purchased it... where would you put ONE (reasonably sized fan) in your shed?

    Thanks for all your input guys! This is quite the site...totally enjoying the "cooler" weather... =)
  18. gzecc

    gzecc Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Sep 24, 2008
    Messages:
    4,033
    Loc:
    NNJ
    I would install it in the upper gable eve on the north or east side. Install a couple of windows at the other end.
  19. snowleopard

    snowleopard Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Dec 9, 2009
    Messages:
    1,495
    To me, your post is like saying, I wanna take a shower in this nice raincoat. Any ideas about how to modify it so that I can do that efficiently? Some things are just best done without impediments, and I think seasoning is one of them.

    We all understand that urge to minimize wood handling, but one nice thing about this kind of labor is that you can pick your weather and day and make it exercise instead of labor--put on some good music and roll with it. I also think there's merit in the turning over of the piles that happens in the move--stuff on the bottom is on top, wood from the middle gets shuffled--a little more drying can take place.

    Like just about everyone who's posted a reply, I look at that shed and imagine the pleasure of walking in there in the winter to gather nice dry wood out of there to go burn.

    Perhaps "the powers that be" would be happier if assured that a beautifully stacked woodpile can be a thing of beauty. You've been around the forum enough to have seen examples of woodpiles that aren't eyesores. Maybe holz hausen, or something like this?

    http://www.niagarablog.com/wood-pile-tree-art/
  20. wood-fan-atic

    wood-fan-atic New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 4, 2010
    Messages:
    870
    Loc:
    Long Island, NY
    As others have already said - dont ruin that shed. Stack in nice, straight, single rows out in the sun and wind. It does not take alot of room to store 4+ cords.... and it can be neat and tidy. This pic is from a few weeks ago... there are now 8 stacks of 1/2 cord each. The area is about 30 x 10. This time next year- it will go in the 5 cord woodshed.

    Attached Files:

    • za2.jpg
      za2.jpg
      File size:
      274.7 KB
      Views:
      98
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Share This Page