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Summer stove prep

Post in 'The Hearth Room - Wood Stoves and Fireplaces' started by wg_bent, Mar 18, 2006.

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  1. wg_bent

    wg_bent Minister of Fire

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    Over on the NEPA forum someone mentioned preparing the stove for the off season. I figured it might be a good topic here.

    My plan was:
    1. Get a poly brush to clean the liner (and use it)
    2. Remove all the burn tubes and upper firebrick to clean the stove and vacuum out all the crap that comes down the chimney when I clean the chimney.
    3. Spray wd-40 into the burn tubes and replace them with new cotter pins.
    4. Spray WD-40 on all interior surfaces
    5. Replace firebrick on bottom of stove where Elm took it's toll
    6. Re-set chimney cap. (I never liked the way I installed it...so it will get fixed)
    7. Put little anti-moisture pack that came with the stove into it.

    So did I miss anything?

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  2. MountainStoveGuy

    MountainStoveGuy Minister of Fire

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    Man, im lazy. I just sweep the ash out.
  3. got wood?

    got wood? New Member

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    :) hahahaaha, me too MSG! Sweep out and maybe clean the glass...
  4. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    LOL - that's been my procedure for the wood stove as well. We'll, that and clean the chimney. I'm interested to see how the new stove did this year.

    The pellet stove gets a thorough cleaning by the book. That means removing the baffles, brushing off and and vacuuming out around the heat tubes. Next vacuum ash out of all cavities, check and clean the flue. Then clean the glass and vacuum out the hopper and auger. I like to wax the hopper too. It helps the pellets flow into the auger better.
  5. MountainStoveGuy

    MountainStoveGuy Minister of Fire

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    Insted of wax, try 000 Steel Wool and follow up with spray silicon, a very light coat.
  6. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    Good tip MSG. I have used spray silicone mid-season, though I haven't done the steel wool first. That makes sense. The silicone does work well, but only for a few weeks. The wax seems to stand up a bit better to the long term, abrasive sliding of multiple loads of pellets.
  7. MountainStoveGuy

    MountainStoveGuy Minister of Fire

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    What type of wax are you using? i would think the warm temps would make it soft. But maybe not. I wonder if spray graphite would work?
  8. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    Car wax, I think it's carnuba?? The hopper stays pretty cool. It's only warm to the touch when the stove is running, maybe 105-110 degrees? Much cooler than the surface of a dark car in Arizona sun.
  9. paulgp602

    paulgp602 Member

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    I don't do anything besides sweep the liner and clean the glass. Wood stoves have got to be the lowest maintenance item around the house, compared to everything else that nickel and dimes you to death when you own a home!
  10. MountainStoveGuy

    MountainStoveGuy Minister of Fire

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    The end of season is a good time to check your gaskets, that is door, top load, side load, and ash pan. If you need to replace it, dont forget to take a sample to your dealer and dont forget the cement.
    Ryan
  11. warren88

    warren88 New Member

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    Why is everybody talking about the end of the season?
    In Central Ontario there are many days - and nights - during May, June , August and September when a fire is just the right thing for the evening.
    And sometimes right through the night.
  12. MountainStoveGuy

    MountainStoveGuy Minister of Fire

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    Well, in the latitude that makes up the US, there is a season. I live in a place that its in the 40's at night all summer long, and i burn occasionaly at night. But i stop burning full time in may, and start in september, so thats a season. How else do you define the time that you burn full time to part time? People typically sweep there chimney in the "off season", along with other maintenance duties. There stoves are going full time in the "on season". I suppose if you lived at one of the poles that would be different.
  13. fbelec

    fbelec Minister of Fire

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    yep
    after all is said and done................sit down........... and have a cold one:)
  14. Grumpy

    Grumpy Member

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    BeGreen,
    how do you clean the flue on your 1200i. Do you remove the insert? The video and manual do not seem to cover the flue cleaning. Do you clean from the top down? Can you just open the hinged cleanout door on the exhaust adapter, push a brush down the flue, and vacuum out any resulting ash? Any pointers would be appreciated. BTW, I finally got a brand new stove from the local dealer after my previously posted problems.
  15. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    I'm so glad that they replaced that first lemon and got you a new stove. I was wondering how you were doing. No more grumpy? Have you been a happy camper since then?

    Yes, I pull out the stove enough so that I can inspect and vacuum. First year my stove flue looked so clean you would have thought I wasn't using the stove. Each year, the pipe is pretty clean checked from the top and bottom. So each year, all I've done is pull out the insert and vacuumed out the minor amount of ash in the cleanout door. I also vacuum out the blowers while it's out.

    Last summer, I felt it must be time to clean the flue top to bottom by now. I went with a high powered light and inspected it closely top to bottom, but it was still very clean. This year I've switched from Lignetics to Oregon Wood Products, Blazers. I am seeing some regular "bearding" on the thermocouple that hasn't been there before, so I will inspect carefully this summer. It may mean that this is the year for the complete brush out. If so, I will do it as you described. Top to bottom, vacuuming out via the inspection door.

    Note: if you need to unclamp the flue pipe (above the inspection door) it's best to have a new gasket on hand. They break down after a couple of disconnects of the flue. I've only replaced mine once, but keep a spare on hand so that I don't have to leave the stove hanging out while waiting to get a new gasket. ( Our cats get very curious about any new opening they can explore.)
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