Taiwan stoves

jb in ny Posted By jb in ny, Oct 3, 2006 at 3:45 PM

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  1. jb in ny

    jb in ny
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    Sep 12, 2006
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    A Taiwan stove that looks like an antique but is clearly marked "Taiwan" on the back. Who made those stoves? Any information on them would also be appreciated. It looks solid with no cracks but it doesn't go back together with the ease of the 1897 stove we have. Thanks again, Diane
     
  2. Shane

    Shane
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    Can you post a picture of it? Could be a Dutchwest or a Franklin. There were several cast in Taiwan.
     
  3. jb in ny

    jb in ny
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    In order to post a picture, what would I do - it's a digital camera.
     
  4. Shane

    Shane
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    Size the picture so that it's not larger than 250kb. Then come to teh forum and go to post reply. At teh bottom you can add attachments. Add your picture file there and post the reply. We'll be able to see the picture then.
     
  5. jb in ny

    jb in ny
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    Here they are - took a little time to get them down to size. Hope this works. Diane
     

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  6. jb in ny

    jb in ny
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    Here's the front view.
     

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  7. elkimmeg

    elkimmeg
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    Are you up to total rebuilding that stove? That stove has been exposed to the elements and every cast iron joint is probably gone. To get all that surface rust off it would be best to have it sand blasted. wWth all the work you still have a poorly made Scandia knock off. Probably a poluting beast from the late 70's Yeah its a knock off looking like the 1930 wood/coal stoves like one of the Chubby's

    Tell us if the are levers to shake the bottom grates it could be a coal stove
     
  8. jb in ny

    jb in ny
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    No, no grates - it's not a coal stove. Thanks for your input.
     
  9. Willhound

    Willhound
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    Have one. Don't use it anymore because it burned wood faster than I could haul it indoors. Had absolutely no ability to control draft as there were three different ways to load it (front, side and top) and none of them sealed very well. We used it to heat an old cottage property we had, but finally removed it because we were afraid that we would burn the camp down. In order to get decent heat from it we had to burn full blast most of the time. Pics of mine in this thread from last winter.

    http://www.hearth.com/econtent/index.php/forums/viewthread/979/

    Sorry, don't mean to sound negative on your find, just trying to give you a heads up to be realistic about the heating capability. I remember it being a very cute looking stove though.
    Absolutely not an antique. Ours came from a local hardware store circa 1978, brand new. He had about 12 of them. Not sure who the distributor was, I think they showed up in an unmarked truck for cash.

    Willhound
     
  10. berlin

    berlin
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    those stoves are designed to have much of the combustion controlled via stack damper unlike most. controll the fire that way and it will be a decent little heater with decent wood consumption and heat output, albeit not anwhere as good as many other pre-epa heaters
     
  11. Shane

    Shane
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    I have one of those stoves. I pulled it out of a customers house. I kept it to make a sign out of. For burning I wouldn't bother the casting is thin and the thing is not well built.
     
  12. jb in ny

    jb in ny
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    I appreciate the two different views. I realize there is some rebuilding of the Taiwan stove. We are deciding between the Upland 207 and one other non airtight we have. Personal preference and more experience with using non airtight are driving our decision. Diane
     
  13. Shane

    Shane
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    So I suppose you've stuck with the good old AppleII as well. I mean if you want ot burn a non-epa polluting beast that's your business.
     
  14. Corie

    Corie
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    Nov 18, 2005
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    jb,

    No disrespect meant, but the Taiwan made stove is junk. I'm not going to sugar coat it for you like some of the other members are doing and I'm certainly not going to recommend using a stove like that. I know certain forum members are seeing me write this and thinking "That stove is perfectly safe to install, as long as your careful and run the unit right, it will probably heat your house safely."

    MY problem with the situation is that you and so many other people are so willing to completely forego or at least partically ignore what would be safest situation when it comes to wood heating. People are so precautious about so many things in life, from the type of car they drive, the food they eat, the town they live, etc. Yet people, like yourself, are willing to insert an appliance into their house which is going to burn solid fuel and is certainly made of questionable quality. Sure, you can sand away some of the rust and make the stove look somewhat presentable.

    But what about the cast iron panels? Probably poorly cast with the potential to crack during a fire. Maybe not. But that possiblity is there. Certainly the possibility of catastrohpic failure is there with any situation where a solid fuel appliance is installed. But I think the possiblitity of it increases exponentially when one decides to install a stove with an unknown manufacturer, an unknown history (of overfiring?), and a lack of reasonable air controls.

    If it were me, I wouldn't consider using that stove for anything other than a garden planter.

    Personally, it isn't worth the risk.
     
  15. jb in ny

    jb in ny
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    Sep 12, 2006
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    We had never intended to use the Taiwan stove but do have two others to choose from. We realized from looking at the quality of the materials used in the Taiwan stove compared to the 1897 (The Gold Coin Stove Co., Troy, NY) it was junk.

    I had read a few articles about the raw nerves that exist between the airtight crowds and non-airtight crowds. Just asking for information and opinions - and completely respecting yours. I am sorry if I made Shane's blood pressure go up. That was not my intention - only information. Please sleep more soundly knowing the Taiwan goes back to the shed. Diane
     
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