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TEXTURED PAINT?

Post in 'DIY and General non-hearth advice' started by ROYJ24, Sep 19, 2008.

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  1. ROYJ24

    ROYJ24 Member

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    Is this applied on walls & ceiling like regular paint, with roller and brush?

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  2. GVA

    GVA Minister of Fire

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    textured paint? or paint texture?

    If it's the paint texture it's almost as thick as joint compound, and from I remember it gets added to a paint of your choice.
    I used it years ago at my parents house to blend the old 1904 textured plaster walls where it needed to be patched it kinda resembled the popcorn ceiling look though not as pronounced..this probably didn't help did it..... :roll:
  3. Hogwildz

    Hogwildz Minister of Fire

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    I think he's thinking of the texture paint comes in 5gallon buckets premixed.
    I used it back in the 90's on my ceilings. Let me see if I can't jog my brain back that far...... hmmmmm.......
    I think we rolled it on, and I used a brush to make 1/2 swirl designs overlapping each other. Its messy, that I do remember.
    Keep in mind, after time when the paint ages, it looks dingy and is a lil harder & messier to repaint than a smooth surface. And if you decide you don't want textured ceilings/walls anymore, its a biach to make smooth again.
    Same lines as when popcorn ceilings were the thing. Make sure thats what you want, & for a long, long time.
  4. ROYJ24

    ROYJ24 Member

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    The problem is I'm trying 2 cover drywalls with bad spackling thru out, new drywalls is not an option.
    So I saw this as a solition.
  5. Hogwildz

    Hogwildz Minister of Fire

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    It is a fairly quick & easy solution. Just wanted to point out, if you plan on being there a while, make sure you feel you can live with the look. Cause once its on, its harder to get rid of then fixing the spackle there now.
    If you want a smooth surface, you can lay 1/4 over top of whats there, or just do a few layers of skimcoat spackling and repaint when done. It can be alot of work and needs patience. I had taken wall paper down that was not properly prepped, and had to skim coat the wall & ceilings in my bathrooms with 3 layers of drywall compound. turned out really nice. Was alot of work though.
  6. savageactor7

    savageactor7 Minister of Fire

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    Roy for covering less than perfect drywall ceiling you want sand paint and that's put on with a thick brush using haphazard crisscrossed strokes. Textured will work too but most people use that for a sunburst, wave type and stucco like design/finishes.
  7. Cluttermagnet

    Cluttermagnet Minister of Fire

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    I think sanded paint is a pretty good idea, if it covers your bad drywall repairs 'good enough'. Think long and hard before applying any of the stucco or texture types. BTW they are traditionally reserved for ceiling use. You rarely see any on walls. If you get a plumbing leak, it is tricky to do repairs and then apply a matching texture in the repair area. If you're not real good with this sort of thing, including drywall repair, you'd best think twice. And if you are good at drywall repair, your tape joints look good anyway. I've done various textures successfully. I think most home owners would not have the skill to pull off these sorts of repairs and make it look any good. Some folks have 'got the touch', probably a lot of folks don't.

    There is one type of texture paint, premixed, which gets applied with a very coarse, wiry looking roller specially designed for the job. They do 'OK'. This may be your best bet with texture. Many stucco ceilings are applied with special tools and techniques, pulling down and away from the wet material, and it takes experience and a good touch to make it look OK.
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