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The Cape Cod is here

Post in 'The Hearth Room - Wood Stoves and Fireplaces' started by charger4406, Dec 4, 2012.

  1. raybonz

    raybonz Minister of Fire

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    Congrats good looking stove! Is the entire stove cast iron of does it have a steel firebox?

    Ray

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  2. thewoodlands

    thewoodlands Minister of Fire

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    I don't think it has a steel firebox.
  3. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    I haven't seen one in person yet, but it sure looks like a steel box interior.

    cape cod1.PNG cape cod2.PNG cape-cod-cutaway.jpg
  4. thewoodlands

    thewoodlands Minister of Fire

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    When I talked with the rep at our local dealer on Monday he said it was, so when I saw Rays post I emailed Travis Industries (P.Ranes) this is what they sent back.
    From Travis; To answer your question the Cape Cod does not have a steel firebox .

    So I'll stop tonight at our local dealer to ask him.
  5. raybonz

    raybonz Minister of Fire

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    I would consider a welded steel firebox a plus as this eliminates any leaks due to bad gaskets or crumbling stove cement.. Jotul has done this too with the F50 and F55.. And steel makes Bart happy too ;)

    Ray
  6. ClanCameron

    ClanCameron New Member

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    Fan noise comment: I saw this one burning at a Minn, MN dealer who also did a lot of tulikivi soapstones. He had all top notch NICE stoves.... however, I remember him commenting that he didn't like running the fans on them because of the noise. I didn't think to ask more and just let the comment go, since I was busy watching the dancing flames. I don't know if he didn't like fans on any stove, or particularly this one. I think most of the comment was related to ambiance though.
  7. Joful

    Joful Minister of Fire

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    I have wondered about this, as well, Ray. We know the primary advantage of a steel firebox: durability. Hang some cast iron panels on the outside, and from a distance, it looks like a real cast iron woodstove. I suspect most cast iron stoves are like mine, with box-in-a-box construction, to temper the heat transferred to the outside. In my stoves, this is achieved by making the primary structure of the outer cast iron shell, and then adding large cast panels that sit in channels inside the stove, about 1" in from the outer skin. Those inner panels take all the abuse, and can be replaced in 30 seconds, as they can be simply lifted out and replaced, if one ever somehow breaks. The 1" airgap between the inner panels and the outer body make it similar to a steel firebox with cast iron skins, but assumed to be less durable, as the base construction relies on cement or gaskets between the cast iron panels instead of a continous welded seam.

    What are the advantages of all-cast iron construction? Simply cosmetics? Keeping an old-world art alive? Is there any performance advantage at all? Clearly Lopi sees some advantage to it, making it the basis of their latest and greatest model, but I'm not sure what that advantage is.
  8. thewoodlands

    thewoodlands Minister of Fire

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    After Begreen posted the pic I sent off a new email to Travis, this is what came back.

    Zap I’m sorry for not getting deeper into your question . We used to make a cast outer shell and a steel interior firebox . What D is a Stainless Steel bracket for our combustor , C is stainless steel 2nd burn tubes for EPA and A in the corners is for outside air for our 2nd dairy burn tubes.

    Attached Files:

  9. raybonz

    raybonz Minister of Fire

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    Not sure of any advantage but I do know the seams will eventually need to be resealed, at least this was the case on my CDW.. I like the steel firebox with cast iron sides as this eliminates the seam issue yet provides the beauty of cast iron...

    Ray
  10. BrowningBAR

    BrowningBAR Minister of Fire

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  11. raybonz

    raybonz Minister of Fire

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    Yes it is definitely an EW loading stove hence the andirons.. I really don't like this feature.. The T6 and NC 30 have a nice square firebox so you can either way.. The T5 is 15-1/2" wide so works pretty good for this too..

    Ray
  12. BrowningBAR

    BrowningBAR Minister of Fire

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    I'm okay with east/west loading. A square firebox is great and is really flexible, but since five of the six stoves I've owned have been e/w loaders, it is what I am used to.

    But, when it comes to a shallow firebox, I am referring to the depth of the firebox. Or, lack of, in this case. Not a lot of room for a good bed of ash and coals for this stove.
    raybonz likes this.
  13. raybonz

    raybonz Minister of Fire

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    Oh OK I see what you're saying this is very true.. MY CDW was EW and shallow.. I prefer a squarish firebox now that I have one..

    Ray
  14. Joful

    Joful Minister of Fire

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    Ray, I think BAR is referring to the height measured from firebox floor to the bottom of the door opening. It looks like it's barely more than 1", not good for holding a bed of ash and coals.

    The actual depth (front to rear) of that firebox does not look any worse than many other E/W stoves.
  15. raybonz

    raybonz Minister of Fire

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    LOL I forgot to take my mental pills before posting.. Thanx! ;)

    Ray
  16. Debbie

    Debbie New Member

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    Hi all,
    The Lopi site says that all their stoves have a cooktop surface, and they show a picture of an open grill. Does anyone have any experience with this with the Cape Cod? I cook on the top of my (soon-to-be-retired) VC Vigilant all the time--I just wait for surface temperatures about 500, and put a cast iron pan on it. Is this what I can do with a Lopi, or are they more specifically designed for cooking?
    thanks!
    raybonz likes this.
  17. webby3650

    webby3650 Master of Fire

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    My cod doesn't seem to get more than 500 on the top. It has the convection area below the top. In the middle, right in front of the flue collar is the hottest place. I guess it would be ok for cooking, more like simmering I guess.
  18. Debbie

    Debbie New Member

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    Tragic! I think that rules out the Cape Cod for us. Thanks for your help...
  19. thewoodlands

    thewoodlands Minister of Fire

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    What type of chimney are you hooked into and how high is it? Another question would be what moisture content is your wood?
  20. jeff_t

    jeff_t Minister of Fire

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    Zap, the top of the stove isn't really the stove top :oops: . It's a convection top, with the top of the firebox beneath and an air space between. If it gets to 500, it's really rockin'.
    raybonz and zap like this.
  21. thewoodlands

    thewoodlands Minister of Fire

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    I just read parts of the owner manual, seven hundred is a high burn, thanks for keeping me straight.
  22. jeff_t

    jeff_t Minister of Fire

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    Wow. Seven hundred on the convection top?
  23. thewoodlands

    thewoodlands Minister of Fire

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  24. webby3650

    webby3650 Master of Fire

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    I can make it go to 700. I've been holding it back a little until I know the stove better. I had it to 650 last night. It's a monster heater, there is no ignoring it's presence in the room. The stove also has a very even heat all over, except the glass of course. I'm loving it!
    charly likes this.
  25. webby3650

    webby3650 Master of Fire

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    I have put in a new 6" class A flue for the Leyden. It's 21' from the floor to the cap. I might take 4' off of it though, I ran the flue way higher than normal to try and get the Leyden to perform better. That's what the rep said to do. It didn't help

    My firewood is a mix of everything and it all tests under 20%, averaging 17% MC.
    The Cod also comes with a moisture meter, I gave it away because I already had one.
    zap likes this.

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