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The New To Me Lopi Republic 1750, Is Home

Post in 'The Hearth Room - Wood Stoves and Fireplaces' started by HDRock, Aug 18, 2013.

  1. HDRock

    HDRock Minister of Fire

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    ;lol Thanks, I wish I was a young man ;lol

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  2. 1750

    1750 Feeling the Heat

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    Most of age is a state of mind -- except for my bad knees, of course. Those are just old knees.
  3. HDRock

    HDRock Minister of Fire

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    This is something I am not sure about , once U get a fire going how to load it up and not have it all going off at once.
    This little 2.2 cu ft fire box is vary different than my old 8cu ft box
    Most of this stuff isn't really specific to this stove
    How long are the secondary's active with a full load?
    I had it fired up last night ,then with a couple of 4" splits secondary's ran about 1 1/2 hours. Edit may have only been 1 hour

    Man !! the secondary's going is really cool :cool::)

    Could U define cigar burns ? are the secondary's working during this ?
    How
  4. BuckthornBonnie

    BuckthornBonnie New Member

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    Good questions... For longer burns you'll want to rake the hot coals forward so the majority of your split's surface area isn't in direct contact with the hot stuff. This delays the burn slightly and burns from front to back. For over-night/long burns, keep the wood tight together. For shorter/day time burns, you can have more space and/or throw in a few logs rather than pack it full (short, hotter fires are best). Your stove may have a spot that burns better than others. You'll also want to learn how your stove reacts to start-ups and re-loads (ie, how long does it take to cool vs. how long does it take to heat up to proper burning temps). I learned quickly that you never put a full load directly onto a hot coal bed, it'll off-gas and get your stove pretty darn hot haha. If you do this have a box fan pointed directly at the stove, shut down the air, and ride it out. There are a bunch of threads on here about stoves going nuclear and other ways to bring 'em down to temp.
    Depending on moisture content and possibly the type of wood, I'd say the secondaries keep firing until the fuel is close to losing its shape and becoming a pile of coals. On a good load last year we had 'em firing for several hours with only a minor air tweak or poke.
  5. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    A cigar burn is N/S loading. Wood burning from the front to the back. In stoves that have a boost manifold front and center (PE, Englander 30NC) some have found this to burn more quickly and hotter. Now I do N/S for startup fires and quick heat and load E/W for longer burns.
  6. HDRock

    HDRock Minister of Fire

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    Oh that makes sense, I have been wondering about the N/S loading deal, it didn't really apply with my old stove.
    So does N/S loading generally give you longer burn times ?
  7. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    Maybe it does for others, but not in our stove.
  8. HDRock

    HDRock Minister of Fire

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    what's the advantage or disadvantage of loading N/S ?
  9. HDRock

    HDRock Minister of Fire

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    Thanks for the reply.
    I did not realize before there was another search function at the top of the page (Search ttl. site ) it works really well, did some searching last night and found answers to most all my questions about running a EPA stove.
  10. Augie

    Augie Feeling the Heat

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    If your stove goes off and it is way to hot, open the door all of the way, the large amount of cool air cools everything down, you can toss a few scoopfuls of ash on the fire while the door is open, and when the temps come back to normal close the door, keep an eye on it for a while but everything should be back to SOP.
  11. HDRock

    HDRock Minister of Fire

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    Really !! open the door ? When you have the air control shut down ?
  12. Augie

    Augie Feeling the Heat

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    Yup, if your air is shut down all the way and temps are still climbing to a point you are uncomfortable, both stove top, and/or flue(this is the going nuclear people talk about) opening the door all the way will add more O2 to the fire but it also allows the fire/flue to suck as much cooler air as it wants through the fireplace, and stops the secondary combustion. This combination of halting secondary combustion and introduction of cool air going up the flue will get everything back under control very quickly.

    the first time it takes BIG BAWLS to pull the door wide open, not just open 6-8 inches, you need to swing the door all the way open , initially you will feel a furnace blast of heat, but it will calm down immediately.
  13. HDRock

    HDRock Minister of Fire

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    What mods did you do?
    I know you put some insulating brick in ,exactly where did you buy it, and what improvements did it make ?
  14. Augie

    Augie Feeling the Heat

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    Insulating Fire Brick on the top and sides, it keeps more heat in the firebox promoting faster secondary combustion and allows me to cut back on the air faster,further than normal for a given load of wood. You can get insulating firebricks at your local fireplace shop.

    This is all I did and the improvement is noticeable. There are other things you can do but then you are wringing the last bit of performance out. Know the IFB wears out quicker and you will have to replace it every other year rather than every 5-8 years for standard.
  15. HDRock

    HDRock Minister of Fire

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    How often do you need to clean out ashes ?
  16. Augie

    Augie Feeling the Heat

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    Depends on the outside temp, the wood type your burning, how long your willing to let coaling stage go. Shoulder seasons I was getting away with once every 2-3 weeks, heart of winter maybe once a week, those really cold weeks, maybe 2x a week.

    The stove runs better with a .5-1 inch layer of ashes on the bottom to provide some added insulation. after that is is a combination of how much you are willing to let get built up before it starts reducing the size of your firebox/ spills out the front.
  17. HDRock

    HDRock Minister of Fire

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    Thanks Augie
    That sounds not to bad, I know It's good to have a couple inches of ash in there.
    Cleaning ashes out of this stove will be a piece of cake.
    My big old stove I could go a month or more depending, and was much harder to reach in the end, and the reach all the way to the end of the 3 foot stove

    Do you take the stove pipe apart when you clean the chimney ?
  18. Augie

    Augie Feeling the Heat

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    Yea, once you have done it a couple of times it is pretty easy. We don't have the ability to open up the flue so in our stoves ash/creosote will fall from the flue and pile on the Steel Plate in the back, pulling the fire bricks and plate can be done without removing the Secondary Burn Tubes. I would say pulling the stove apart and reassembly should take you an additional 10-20min after you have done it a few times.

    When I emptied the stove I usually did it after an overnight burn, didst even wait for all the coals to be gone, moved as many as I could to one side then got a bunch of ashes out, then did the same thing for the other half of the stove, you dont get everything out and you end up putting some hot coals in your ash bucket, but we all leave the ash bucket outside on concrete to cool for 24hrs before emptying it. Well at least I do. I usually didnt empty the ash can until i was ready to fill it up again, in a pinch during an over fire situation tossing a few scoopfuls of ashes on the fire really helps calm things down.

    I need to do My preseason cleaning if you want to stop by for a beer and to see how I do it.
  19. HDRock

    HDRock Minister of Fire

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    Yea ,I took out the baffle bricks, the supports and the rear baffle plate to reduce weight before moving the stove in the house
  20. Augie

    Augie Feeling the Heat

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    you have the Idea then.....
  21. 1750

    1750 Feeling the Heat

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    I finally remembered to grab my manual and look at where they have the thermostat located. It's like I remembered, vertical in the back convection chamber, not in that horizontal chamber where your manual (and the Travis online manual) places it. I'll call the dealer tomorrow and see if we can get a snap disk extender ordered up. Here's the page from my manual:

    Attached Files:

  22. HDRock

    HDRock Minister of Fire

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    Did U install it in that position and try it?
    It's kind of unclear , your instructions say to be sure the snap disk is touching the fire box but, it doesn't say if it should touch the back or bottom of the fire box, looks like they mean the back of the fire box though.
    Do U need the snap disk extender to install it in that way ??
    Does it say any thing about the using the snap disk extender on another page, or at all ?
  23. 1750

    1750 Feeling the Heat

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    It friction fits into the vertical space without the extender, but kept sliding back down when the stove would heat up (and I'm assuming the space would expand).

    I've contacted the sales guy and asked him to provide the extender (it's not included or mentioned in the rest of the manual).

    I also figure I could stack it on some tile, or just fold a support out of a piece of duct metal to get it into contact with the bottom in that left convection chamber.
  24. HDRock

    HDRock Minister of Fire

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    If U want to install it in the channel with the snap disk extender, this is what U need , Snapdisc Braket (1750) part# 250-01370 ,
  25. 1750

    1750 Feeling the Heat

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    Thanks. I haven't heard back from the dealer yet. Do you think just bending some light weight metal (like duct work) to create a table to wedge that thing on would also do the trick? Or does there seem to be something special abot the snap disk bracket?

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