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Thermostat Placement

Post in 'The Pellet Mill - Pellet and Multifuel Stoves' started by dhungy, Nov 1, 2010.

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  1. dhungy

    dhungy Feeling the Heat

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    I am replacing my stock thermostat with a programmable thermostat. Where should relocate it? the isntalelr put in on the right hand outside wall between two windows about 4 feet from the stove. I purchased more wire and the thermostat. I basically want to make sure my stove is not turning on and off to much. I will try to make up a diagram of my setup.

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  2. tsmith

    tsmith Minister of Fire

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    I have my stove downstairs and installed my thermostat upstairs in hallway. I ran 75 feet of wire. Mine cycled a lot too with it near the stove.
  3. imacman

    imacman Guest

    Unless there was NO other place to put it, the installer had no idea what he was doing. Thermostats are NEVER supposed to be placed on exterior walls....only interior ones.

    Relocate the stat to an interior wall that is at least 15' from the stove, but NOT directly inline with the hot air coming out from it.
  4. dhungy

    dhungy Feeling the Heat

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    Hopefully I can post a diagram to show you guys what I am dealing with.
  5. captkirk5858

    captkirk5858 New Member

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    Made this mistake..not quite in-line, but it's in an area that the warm/hot air gets trapped from the stove.... now i have to move it....(wasnt thinking)


    (the sign of a good carpenter is how well he can hide his mistakes)
  6. imacman

    imacman Guest

    Ideally, you want the stat on an interior wall, between 15-20 ft away from the stove, and in an area that needs to be warm....that way the stove will continue heating until that area is warm.
  7. dhungy

    dhungy Feeling the Heat

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    here is the best diagram I could put together you can see I indicated the current placement of the t-stat. The furnace t-stat is on the small wall that is next to the kitchen doorway.

    I thought about putting it in the kitchen.

    Thanks!

    Attached Files:

  8. Shortstuff

    Shortstuff Feeling the Heat

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    As imacman stated, a thermostat should never be placed on any exterior wall. In reference to your diagram, I would put it on the bottom interior wall about 2-3' from the left corner away from the exterior wall. There it is a good distance away from the stove and not in direct line with the convection fan of the stove.

    My thermostat actually sits approximately 4' to the left of my free-standing stove (on the same wall) and works perfectly. The air from my stove has to circulate completely around the room to get to the thermostat.
  9. imacman

    imacman Guest

    That would an good spot.

    My choice would be on the opposite side of that short wall that holds the furnace t-stat so it's actually in the kitchen, although just barely. That's basically what I did, and that wall will "shield" the stove stat from getting hit by the warm air blown across from the stove.

    It also has the added benefit of already having the holes in the sub-floor that the other stat wires ran through.....easy to find from the basement(?)
  10. dhungy

    dhungy Feeling the Heat

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    Its to bad both of the walls on either side of my stove are exterior walls or I would consider putting it to similar to yours.
  11. teetah222

    teetah222 Feeling the Heat

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    My therm is similarly located. Works just fine.
  12. dhungy

    dhungy Feeling the Heat

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    I am as confused about this as I am about who to vote for governor.
  13. richkorn

    richkorn Minister of Fire

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    That's where i'd put it also. Mine is around corner from living room in hallway on wall opposite living room right next to the boiler tstat. Here's a quick sketch:

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  14. dhungy

    dhungy Feeling the Heat

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    Still not sure where to put it..
  15. richkorn

    richkorn Minister of Fire

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    Get a wireless one then you can move it around until you find a place that works for you.
  16. jtakeman

    jtakeman Minister of Fire

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    I must be fruggle, When I see the price of the wireless stats I just see pellets I could buy. Granted they have come down some since I was in the market. But WOW- $110 plus clams is still much!

    dhungy,

    Before I located my programmable wired stat permanently. I picked up a cheapy digital thermometer and tried it in different spots until I fould the right one. One good thing about my stove being in the basement was very easy stat wire routing. I don't think it took ten minutes to do it.
  17. SmokeyTheBear

    SmokeyTheBear Minister of Fire

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    Gee that's a simple one.

    Donald Duck
  18. slls

    slls Minister of Fire

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    I would put it on the interior wall shown at the bottom of your diagram.
  19. teetah222

    teetah222 Feeling the Heat

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    OK, I'm retracting my previous post... Therm worked, but a few days ago my igniter died because the thermostat was turning the stove off and on too frequently. I just put a new igniter in and moved my remote therm unit down the hallway toward the bedrooms... living room will stay a little warmer, bedrooms and bath should not get as cold, and hopefully my new igniter will last longer than 5 months now. Live and learn.
  20. Shortstuff

    Shortstuff Feeling the Heat

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    I'm not sure what the setting is called, but all programmable thermostats that I've owned all had an adjustment in the settings for temperature sensitivity. What this adjustment is for is if your thermostat is calling for heat too often, another words it is sensing minor temperature differential, then you can change the setting for it. For example, instead of calling for heat with less than 1° temperature change, you can set it to call for heat only when it senses 2° temperature change.

    Again, I don't remember what it's called (the setting) but check the thermostat manual and it should be in there to allow you to make the thermostat less sensitive.
  21. jtakeman

    jtakeman Minister of Fire

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    Most call it "swing" but Honeywell also has cycles per hour. I think Honeywells lowest setting is 2 cycles per hour. The stats with swing are more desired as the cycle could be extended to several hours.

    Haubera, Does your englander have the hi/lo thermostat setting? It should help extend the the life of igniter. That and what shortstuff was saying can limit the load you put on the igniter. I try to limit the cycles of 2 to 4 per day. Any more and I go to the hi/lo stat setting. Then the igniter is only used once to start the stove and idles along on the lowest heat setting the stove has until its called to duty again. Stove will go to the setting you have on the control panel. Both these can really save the wear and tear on the igniter!
  22. teetah222

    teetah222 Feeling the Heat

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    Yep, it's already set to 2 degrees, but I was trying also to run at a mid-range heat setting as that's what the manual suggested. Turned it down after I was having to hand light it while the igniter was out, and probably won't go back as the higher setting also caused harder carbon in the burn pot. Much easier to clean the pot when the carbon deposits are softer on the lower heat setting. As I said, live and learn. ( Last year was my first with the stove, so I was trying to run it strictly by the directions. Branching out this year and trying different things.)
  23. teetah222

    teetah222 Feeling the Heat

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    I went to the o/o setting when I first put in the thermostat last February because the stove was running me out of the house too hot without it, and no one really explained the difference in the 2 set-ups, so I thought the stove should be shutting off and on every time the room got too warm (really didn't understand about the high/low and that I needed to push the on button on that setting to get the stove to light). Anyway, after learning what I have lately, I'll probably check on changing it to high/low once it gets later in the year. Will have to see how it goes. Thanks for the input. :)
  24. hossthehermit

    hossthehermit Minister of Fire

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    WTF, PEOPLE??????????? My God, I realaze that 90% of the people on here are totally anal, but for cryin' out loud, think before you" ENLIGHTEN " for once.
    Q. What does a thermostat do?
    A. It controls the temperature at the point where it's located.
    Q. Where should I place the thermostat?
    A. Where I want to control the temperature.

    Put it right beside your recliner.
  25. Snowy Rivers

    Snowy Rivers Minister of Fire

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    This is not an easy question to answer without seeing the layout of the room/house.

    Basically, IMHO, get the stat as far away from the stove as you can and still keep it within the same room or if not close enough that you can heat the largest effective area without Frying the room that the stove is in.


    Hallways are a real issue. If you have a hallway close by that will isolate the flow of heat then install the stat close to the exit from the room at its junction with the hallway.

    Too close and the stat is going to run the stove ragged trying to keep up.

    If you get the stat too far away, the room will literally fry before the stat is happy and shuts the stove off.

    Now, many times a stove that off in a small living room that is connected to a long hallway can heat an entire house, by simply allowing the normal Thermal circulation to direct the heat down the ceiling and the cooler air will flow along the floor and back to the stove.


    Here is how to tell whats happening.

    With the stove running, go along the floor in any hallway leading to the area that has the stove and use a light piece of yarn thread attached to a short stick, watch to see the air movement along the floor once the stove heats the room it is in.

    Many times leaving bedroom doors open is needed for this to work well.

    Even a very torturous path can flow air in a thermal ciculation quite well.

    The secret is not the use of fans, but instead just allowing cold and warm air to do what it does naturally. Cold always sinks and hot always rises.

    As the warm air rises, the colder air somewhere in the pathway must fall, this creates a natural flow of cool air across the floor and back to the stove where it is heated and then the cycle
    replicates itself.

    I have heated a small home of 1300 feet this way. The house had 3 bedrooms at one end and a dining room off to the side. The Living room had the stove and was at one end of the house.

    The heat cycle would start as long as the rooms were all open and the stove was running for a bit.

    Here is a sketch of the floor plan on that house. The red and blue shows the flow. Believe me, we checked the airflow really well and it was for sure pretty much as its shown.

    The warm air would race down the ceiling of the hallway and the cold air would race across the floor and back to the stove.

    Local HVAC tech told me repeatedly, that this would not work, HAAAAAAAAA it worked great

    Now if at least the master bedroom door was not open the cycle was seriously curtailed.

    We heated that entire house with an Earthstove traditions for about $75 for an entire year using the nut shells.

    Planning is everything, and a little luck helps too.


    Snowy

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