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timberland wood stove baffle

Post in 'The Hearth Room - Wood Stoves and Fireplaces' started by SouthAl, Jan 24, 2006.

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  1. SouthAl

    SouthAl New Member

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    I know that this maker has long gone out of business but we really like the stove and don't want to replace it.

    However, after many years of good service the baffle plate has finally given up.

    Since I have removed it before and rebent it to be flat, I know it is just a piece of sheet metal of some type. Since it is rebendable, I would imagine it is some type of steel.

    However, my question is what kind of steel would be appropriate to use?

    Thanks for any answer.

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  2. BrotherBart

    BrotherBart Hearth.com LLC Mid-Atlantic Division Staff Member

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    Can't tell ya what kind of steel. I just replaced the baffle in my Sierra after twenty years of being rode hard. I just took it down to the local iron works and handed it to the plate steel guy there. Told him a little bit thicker wouldn't hurt my feelings. Twenty minutes and $49 later I had a new baffle that is doing a great job.

    Perfect flanges matching the old one and fits beautifully.
  3. SouthAl

    SouthAl New Member

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    thanks for the suggestion. Never even thought of just bringing it to the iron works without telling them exactly what I wanted.
  4. Corie

    Corie Minister of Fire

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    the website http://www.emachineshop.com/


    will cut any size piece of steel in a large variety or thicknesses and alloys. They'll also ship the steel directly to your house. Just another possible solution :)
  5. johnnytugs1

    johnnytugs1 New Member

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    hi , i have a timberline stove from the 80's (see a pic in the picture section) and i believe my baffle is 3/16 to 1/4 " steel. it's heavy as a @%&* and it doesn't bend at all. what type of timberline do u have? any pic's . i just set mine up and i love it.
    john........jackson, n.j.
  6. SouthAl

    SouthAl New Member

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    Just checked your picture and I have the same stove. But on mine I have a rear warming ledge that slides on from the back plus two ( one on each side ) warming circles.
  7. Corey

    Corey Minister of Fire

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    SouthAl

    Within reason, the type of steel doesn't matter much, but thickness does matter. Like JohnnyTugs says, 3/16" - 1/4" would make you a good baffle plate that shouldn't warp unless you do some pretty wicked overfiring. If they press you, "mild steel", "plain carbon steel" or "A36 structural steel" would all be perfectly acceptable and on the lower end of the price spectrum. If they start throwing out words like "high carbon steel", "chrome-moly", "high alloy steel" they are trying to sell you something you don't really need.

    Corey
  8. SouthAl

    SouthAl New Member

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    Thanks. That was the piece of the information of the type of steel that I was missing, not being a machinist. I do have the measurements from when I had it out last year and the 1/4" matches to what I measured. The size is 28" x 12" by 1/4" so I don't expect a huge bill. And yes, as JohnnyTugs said, it is heavy but it does bend. I don't know how much it would when it was new, but after warping from years of heat and use, it definitely does bend. In fact, it was a local stove dealer/chimney sweep that told me what to do. His suggestions was to either jump on it, or drive a car over it. And having to do it twice in 20+ years of use isn't bad.

    Now I have to wait until I get home because the office firewall doesn't let me access Emachineshop.com to do it during lunch.
  9. BrotherBart

    BrotherBart Hearth.com LLC Mid-Atlantic Division Staff Member

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    Yep, that is what I did to my old baffle a couple of times. I used my specialized machinist tool, a three quarter ton four wheel drive Suburban to flatten it back out.
  10. Corey

    Corey Minister of Fire

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    Good luck with your endeavor. If emachineshop gets too crazy, post back here...I may have something that size laying in the scrap bin. Also if the baffle is just a straight piece of metal with no bends or other features that keep it from being reversible, you may consider flipping it over every season or so to help equalize the heat stresses that do build up in the metal. That would further minimize the warping potential.

    Corey
  11. SouthAl

    SouthAl New Member

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    I found a local ironworks shop for the baffle. And not only is the price reasonable, they are delivering it free. Have to wait a few days until they are in the neighborhood, but beats taking off time from work to have to go get it.

    That is a good suggestion that I hadn't thought of. Too late for this one.

    Allan
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