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TIRES FOR MY WOOD HAULING TRUCK

Post in 'The Gear' started by STICK, Mar 21, 2014.

  1. STICK

    STICK Member

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    I use the old wood hauling P-U for everything. So, recently when shopping for replacement tires I found the local tire suppliers had only "P" series tires available. I do know that Firestone makes a commercial grade tire "TRANSFORCE" but the local Firestone store tells me it is unavailable.

    I did find this tire at "tirebuyer.com" at a quite favorable price. Good reviews.

    Has anyone else looked at the tires when you fully load your truck with wood?

    I put extra pressure in them with such a load. But, "P" series tires are not made for the potentially heavy load of logs.

    I also get better service life from the more beefy tire.

    I am interested in your experience.
    Last edited: Mar 21, 2014

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  2. Beer Belly

    Beer Belly Minister of Fire

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    "E" Rated is the way to go
  3. BrotherBart

    BrotherBart Hearth.com LLC Mid-Atlantic Division Staff Member

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    On my Suburban that tips the scales at 7,100 pounds with just me and the cat in it I run BFG Commercial T/A Traction E rated tires. Love'em. Especially when I have a ton of pellets in the truck and a ton on the trailer behind it.
    Beer Belly likes this.
  4. ironpony

    ironpony Minister of Fire

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    tires are critical and easily overloaded, I would say LT at a minimum load range D preferably E as BB suggested. Then the tire will hold more than the PU can.
    P is passenger car, I would not even consider them.
  5. D8Chumley

    D8Chumley Minister of Fire

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  6. blades

    blades Minister of Fire

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    I use the treadwrights- they have been working just fine, particularly when you consider that the cost is 50% or more less than conventional purchase. I have no complaints been using their products for close to 10 years now.
  7. mustash29

    mustash29 Feeling the Heat

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    I am an avid fan of the BFG All Terrain. For a smaller truck, the load range C's last forever.
    --- Had 31 x 10.50 on my 91 Sonoma.
    --- Had 31 x 10.50 on my 01 S-10 ZR2 stock, now have 32 x 11.50's.
    --- Had 31 x 10.50 Long Trails (5 rib highway tread) on my 03 Blazer ZR2 stock. Those wore VERY well but were not the best for mud or snow. I now run 31 x 10.50 AT's on it.

    My 06 Duramax has Firestone Transforce on the rear, Hankook Dynapro on the front. It was like this when I got it. These tires are ok for dry pavement but NOTHING else IMO. I would not want to push my luck in the rain. They suck in the snow. I'm afraid to think what they would do in mud because they can't get traction on wet grass.

    I have heard some say that the BFG AT is not all that suitable for a 3/4 ton truck as they tend to wear fast due to the softer tread compound.

    A co-worker had BFG Traction TA's on his F-150 and loved them, untill his teenager learned how to race, do burnouts, clutch drops, shattered a rear end, then shattered the tranny / T-case. Yep, dumb kid who is going to school for auto mechanics. :rolleyes:
  8. blades

    blades Minister of Fire

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    Any of the semi off road open tread design tires are going to be shorter on wear life. Hey , but the look cool. But they also are noisy some more so than others. If it has a high rating for snow it is going to be of a softer compound. Off Road and Mudding tires seldom make good everyday travel tires, I am running Sentinels from tread wright they whine a bit but not that bad, not that open a tread currently have about 15K on them and they look very good yet,LT265r17 E, they were $110ea. + shipping. These are on a 9100 lbs F250 which regularly sees a 1 ton + load in the back. My 350 needs tires at this point. Likely get the same ones if available for it as well. They have one that looks like a very similar pattern to the BFG AT that seems to be popular. I have no experience with either.
  9. nwmo_aggie

    nwmo_aggie New Member

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    For mileage and weight carrying, the Firestone Treansforce and the BFG Commercial Traction TA are some of the best I've ever seen. I had right at 95k on My last set of transforce tires.

    But they're spendy, and not that great in mud. I liked them both really well in snow, especially the commercial traction TA.

    Dads been running those treadwright tires for probably 15 years now. Really likes them. They are maybe not the best if it takes you 10 years to wear out a set of tires, but no issues carrying the load. It seems like what happens is the sidewalls eventually crack if they set outside...but you have to consider by that point the tire carcass is 15 years old. For what you're doing, I'd feel a lot better ruining one of those vs a $250+ Transforce... I actually might order a set of 6, and toss the extras in the corner of the garage so I had it when I did snag one on a stump.
  10. nwmo_aggie

    nwmo_aggie New Member

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    That's the one that dad got this last time for his 3500 Chevy single wheel. Holds really good in snow. Whines a little, but not bad. Looks good
  11. KD0AXS

    KD0AXS Member

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    What year/make/model truck are we talking about here? What size tires do you need? That's going to make a huge difference in what tires you want to look at, and the price.

    I have 295/70/R18 Nitto Terra Grapplers on my 2005 F-350. I have about 18,000 miles on them and so far they seem to be wearing well. They're great in the snow, and they have a load rating of over 4,000 lbs each. Unfortunately, tires for a truck aren't exactly cheap when you have 18" wheels, regardless of what brand you go with. If you have an older truck with 15" or 16" wheels, the tires will be much cheaper.
    Last edited: Mar 22, 2014
  12. STICK

    STICK Member

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    I am replacing tires on a 1983 Toyota P-U long bed 4WD SR5. with 15 inch rims. Tire size 235/75/15. The best load range I have found so far in this size has been in a "commercial" type tire like the transforce or BFG commercial T/A traction these tires have a 6 ply rating for load range "C". Larger tire sizes get into 8 then 10 ply rating offering greater load rating.
    This long and narrow truck has pulled an amazing load of logs out of the forest for its size. I can get just shy of half a cord in it. A load of green logs is quite a stretch for the little fella.
  13. Halligan

    Halligan Feeling the Heat

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    Toyo AT/II is what I'm presently running in load range E. Another good tire is the Goodyear Silent Armor Pro Grade which are great in snow. Neither of these tires are cheap though.

    Like others said, definitely stay away from P-metric sizes when hauling wood. Load range D should be minimum.
  14. smokedragon

    smokedragon Minister of Fire

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    That's all that will go on my truck. Buy a brand and tread pattern you like that is E rated.

    I purchased 130 solid blocks (4x8 cinder blocks) for a project I was helping someone with. A pallet has 120 in it, so we got a pallet with 10 more.

    At 30 lbs each, that is 4200 lbs. Because the project site was only 3 miles from the store, I had them put the pallet on the bed of the F250 (nearly picked the front wheels off the ground).

    The tires held, and I can say without a doubt that E rated tires will handle all the firewood you can slam onto a pickup bed.
  15. KD0AXS

    KD0AXS Member

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    Problem is that they don't make 235/75/15 in load range E. Highest load range in that size is C. I think what you need to be looking for is a P235/75/R15 XL. (XL= Extra Load) They will be rated for more weight than a LT235/75/R15 Load Range C.

    Tire Rack has the Transforce. They're rated for 1985 lbs.

    http://www.tirerack.com/tires/tires...375R5TAT&vehicleSearch=false&fromCompare1=yes

    Then you have something like this in a 235/75/R15 XL. They're rated for 2271 lbs.

    http://www.tirerack.com/tires/tires...8OWLXLV2&vehicleSearch=false&fromCompare1=yes
    Last edited: Mar 23, 2014
  16. nwmo_aggie

    nwmo_aggie New Member

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    Yep, C is about as good as it gets for this one. And probably advice here based on perceptions the OP was looking for tires for an S10 all the up to a 3500 super dually.

    Has anyone ever dealt with TireRack? I look there occasionally to see a large range of tire choices, but have never bought.
  17. prezes13

    prezes13 Feeling the Heat

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    I used to buy from tire rack all the time however last tire purchase was from town fair tire. I was buying tires for my wife's car tire was listed $195 on tire rack I got them for $165 from town fair tire it included alignment install TPM the whole mine yards.
  18. Robert V

    Robert V New Member

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    I sell a lot of different tires of all different brands at work. My choice for an affordable on/off road tire in that size would be the Mastercraft courser C/T. They have a heavy sidewall, open lug pattern, made in the USA, and come standard in load range C.
  19. bushmaster

    bushmaster New Member

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    cooper at3
    bfg a/t
    toyo open country
    all good aggresive tire load . load range e is very stiff tire unless you have a heavy truck and drive loaded alot, and pull a loaded trailer

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